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20,500 energy efficient lightbulbs installed in Canberra

By 27 March 2013 13

ActewAGL have been a busy little company making energy-saving house calls to over 2,700 Canberra homes since the program started in Feb, installing over 20,500 energy saving lightbulbs since the program started in Feb.

ActewAGL General Manager Retail Ayesha Razzaq said, “The program has received a very positive response from the community with over 2,700 Canberra homes receiving a free energy-saving house call. So far, the light bulbs we’ve already replaced will save participating households an average of $100 on their annual electricity bill.*

“With over 20,500 replaced in just two months it’s clear that this is a necessary and important initiative. I was amazed when the Energy Efficiency team did a house-call at my home and found 11 old light bulbs that needed replacing. That was much more that I had expected.

“All of the old light bulbs are being collected by ActewAGL’s Energy Efficiency team and disposed of in a safe and environmentally friendly way.”

Along with the 20,500 energy-efficient light globes installed, 5,100 standby power controllers and 1,900 draught stoppers have also been installed. ACT residents may participate in the program by calling ActewAGL’s Energy Efficiency team on 1300 789 002 to book a free energy-saving house call.

That’s a pretty good effort. Our own Girt_Hindrance was visited by Actew and wrote us this piece for us last month.

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13 Responses to
20,500 energy efficient lightbulbs installed in Canberra
tim_c 8:55 am
28 Mar 13
#1

So, with that many light bulbs changed, surely by now Actew must have noticed a reduction in the overall demand for electricity in the ACT…. or have they just found out what the rest of us (excluding Earth Hour observers) already knew: that lighting accounts for only a very minor proportion of total energy used?

I was amazed when the Energy Efficiency team did a house-call at my home and found 11 old light bulbs that needed replacing.

Really, a whole team?! So just how many Energy Efficiency ‘experts’ does it take to change 11 old light bulbs?! And how efficient are they really if a whole team is required?!

davo101 9:17 am
28 Mar 13
#2

tim_c said :

So, with that many light bulbs changed, surely by now Actew must have noticed a reduction in the overall demand for electricity in the ACT….

Also given that incandescent bulbs have not been available since 2009 I would have thought that the only ones still left and working would be in places where they are rarely used. Changing a bulb that is never on to a more efficient one is not going to safe much electricity.

chewy14 9:44 am
28 Mar 13
#3

tim_c said :

So, with that many light bulbs changed, surely by now Actew must have noticed a reduction in the overall demand for electricity in the ACT…. or have they just found out what the rest of us (excluding Earth Hour observers) already knew: that lighting accounts for only a very minor proportion of total energy used?

I was amazed when the Energy Efficiency team did a house-call at my home and found 11 old light bulbs that needed replacing.

Really, a whole team?! So just how many Energy Efficiency ‘experts’ does it take to change 11 old light bulbs?! And how efficient are they really if a whole team is required?!

There was only one guy when they came to my house, but I’m sure they can organise for a number of these people in a team to attend different houses at the same time. Amazing, I know.

pajs 10:02 am
28 Mar 13
#4

tim_c said :

So, with that many light bulbs changed, surely by now Actew must have noticed a reduction in the overall demand for electricity in the ACT…. or have they just found out what the rest of us (excluding Earth Hour observers) already knew: that lighting accounts for only a very minor proportion of total energy used?

I was amazed when the Energy Efficiency team did a house-call at my home and found 11 old light bulbs that needed replacing.

Really, a whole team?! So just how many Energy Efficiency ‘experts’ does it take to change 11 old light bulbs?! And how efficient are they really if a whole team is required?!

Household energy consumption data for Australia suggests lighting is about 14% of household use (BREE, 2009-10 data). Lighting makes up the biggest share of ‘appliance’ energy consumption in households, and lighting is the biggest component of that overall ‘appliances’ category. Appliances, then space heating, then water heating are the three biggest household energy end uses.

‘Residential’ end use is about 11% of all final energy demand for Australia (3rd or 4th largest energy using sector).

So addressing the energy efficiency of household lighting is a pretty sensible thing to do, given it can be done for a fairly low cost and little or no impact on amenity.

gooterz 10:09 am
28 Mar 13
#5

Incandescents are 100% efficient in Canberra winters.

Energy savers don’t last as long and need more energy to produce, and contain harmful amounts of mercury.
The mercury is fine till you break a bulb while the lights on.

Still its all free and billed to all the other rate payers.

http://www.designrecycleinc.com/led%20comp%20chart.html

LED lights last for 50000 hours, use half the power emit 1/10 th the heat, turn on instantly, don’t buzz and don’t contain toxic mercury.

Watson 10:18 am
28 Mar 13
#6

I cannot believe no one has yet asked this. How many ActewAGL guys does it take to change 20,500 lighbulbs?

Dad joke…

pajs 10:36 am
28 Mar 13
#7

gooterz said :

Incandescents are 100% efficient in Canberra winters.

Energy savers don’t last as long and need more energy to produce, and contain harmful amounts of mercury.
The mercury is fine till you break a bulb while the lights on.

Still its all free and billed to all the other rate payers.

http://www.designrecycleinc.com/led%20comp%20chart.html

LED lights last for 50000 hours, use half the power emit 1/10 th the heat, turn on instantly, don’t buzz and don’t contain toxic mercury.

I think you might find that “100% efficient” for lighting might mean all energy consumed produces light, without wastage, including through heat. Given you live closer to the floor than the ceiling, extra heat emitted from lighting up high (not to mention leaking into the roofspace) is not that helpful, even in winter.

I’m not sure where you get your other claims from. LED’s are good and getting better, but that doesn’t mean incandescents are a better choice than compact fluorescents.

Yes, there is mercury in a compact fluoro, but the bulk of it is bound in powder and not going to be released by breaking a bulb. The quantities are tiny as well. There is also recycling available for mercury containing lamps, such as through the Fluorocycle scheme run by the Lighting Council.

I’d be more concerned about mercury exposure from the food chain and from stack emissions at coal-fired power plants and crematoria, myself.

miz 10:42 am
28 Mar 13
#8

I also got a device to switch off standby devices, but I have unplugged it as it keeps switching off my telly after one hour – usually right at the end of the show. Very annoying.
Happy with the new light bulbs – I had not changed some because I was under the impression you had to have open light fittings. They reckon not. Though I am not sure how $7 per light bulb can be justified when incandescent bulbs are only about 20c each, and my leccy bills are not high.

tim_c 11:03 am
28 Mar 13
#9

chewy14 said :

There was only one guy when they came to my house, but I’m sure they can organise for a number of these people in a team to attend different houses at the same time. Amazing, I know.

That is pretty amazing, but in that case I’d expect the original post to read something like “…I was amazed when [a member of] the Energy Efficiency team did a house-call at my home…

bikhet 11:18 am
28 Mar 13
#10

miz said :

Though I am not sure how $7 per light bulb can be justified when incandescent bulbs are only about 20c each, and my leccy bills are not high.

Any cost can be justified when you’re using someone else’s money.

Aeek 1:02 pm
28 Mar 13
#11

I’ve given up on the compact fluros, not bright enough for work areas and they burn out way too often in my heritage flat dish light fittings.
Halogen bulbs give me a true 100w equivalent and actually last.
Wish I’d been aware of them earlier.

miz 1:11 pm
28 Mar 13
#12

Exactly, bikhet. The dude said it was about enabling ACTEW to make some kind of carbon reduction claim. In other words, any benefit to the consumer from this program is secondary.

chewy14 1:27 pm
28 Mar 13
#13

miz said :

Exactly, bikhet. The dude said it was about enabling ACTEW to make some kind of carbon reduction claim. In other words, any benefit to the consumer from this program is secondary.

It’s allowing them to meet their requirements under the government’s new energy efficiency law.
http://www.environment.act.gov.au/energy/energy_efficiency_improvement_scheme_eeis

I don’t think they could give a flying f**k if it does anything for the consumer (although it should).

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