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31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags

By johnboy - 28 October 2010 105

[First filed: Oct 27, 2010 @ 10:31]

plastic bags

Simon Corbell has announced the end of light plastic shopping bags with the final ban to be in place from 1 November next year.

Before panicking bear in mind there will be many exemptions:

The Plastic Shopping Bags Ban Bill 2010 will ban the supply of plastic shopping bags of 35 microns or less, generally the type distributed through supermarkets, grocery stores and takeaway food outlets.

A range of bags will be unaffected by the ban, including barrier bags of the type dispensed from a roll to hold items such as fruit or meat and heavier retail bags used in department, footwear and clothing stores.

The Government expects that retailers will provide a range of bags to consumers to replace light weight plastic bags including reuseable ‘green’ bags, paper bags and biodegradable bags which meet Australian Standard AS 4736-2006. The sale of plastic bin liners for waste containers in the home is unaffected by the ban.

I’m still not sure how we’re getting greasy take-away home without making a mess in the car, but we’re going to find out.

UPDATE: The Greens’ Caroline Le Couteur has expressed her pleasure at this piece of Green policy being adopted.

What’s Your opinion?


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105 Responses to
31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags
16
AngryHenry 11:36 am
27 Oct 10
#

random said :

Otherwise it’s rather hard to throw a handful of green beans, snow peas, chilli peppers etc. into your trolley. Obviously you don’t need to stretch a plastic bag around a watermelon.

Which is why I said ‘most’ fruit and veg.

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17
Jim Jones 11:46 am
27 Oct 10
#

John Moulis said :

We’re being sent to the poorhouse just to give a powerful, upper middle class minority a warm fuzzy feeling.

Getting rid of some plastic bags is going to send everyone to the poorhouse?

I had no idea that plastic bags were such an intrinsic part of the capitalist system.

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18
Me no fry 11:48 am
27 Oct 10
#

Is there any evidence that such measures actually work to reduce usage of plastic bags overall, or is this just something that will make us all feel better about driving to the shops for food that has been flown in from China/Israel/Indonesia/wherever?

Not that I’m against reducing waste. I reuse all my plastic shopping bags, and when I’m finished with them I tie knots in them so they are less likely to become wind-borne (this makes me feel slightly better about driving to the shops for food that has been flown in from China/Israel/Indonesia/wherever).

I’d like to go back to shopping as I remember it in the 60’s and 70’s – groceries were packed in brown bags, and when you shopped for veges you took them home all mixed together in one bag – the bag you took to the shops with you.

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19
Joker 11:51 am
27 Oct 10
#

Originally, wasn’t the banning of plastic bags to stop sea turtles mistaking plastic bags for jelly fish?
Is it about land fill? Seriously, how much volume does a plastic bag take up? Surely most are used as bin liners anyway. Let’s ban Nappies and pre-packaged ‘fresh food’ that takes huge amounts of landfill.

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20
TVStar 11:55 am
27 Oct 10
#

KB1971 said :

What does a first class ticket have to do with the environment?

I can’t argue with stupidity. Sorry.

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21
3Jane 11:57 am
27 Oct 10
#

Love it! In Adelaide it cost me 10c for a plastic bag recently, or 15c for a nice big sturdy one from the supermarket. At other places, shops would supply a paper bag instead.

I find cotton or calico bags really convenient, as you can just throw them in the wash when they get greasy or dirty. My local Salvo’s is currently selling them for 20c each. True, you can’t use them for bin liners, but between recycling and composting, my family only needs a couple of bin liners a week.

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22
rosscoact 12:00 pm
27 Oct 10
#

the sky is falling the sky is falling!

19 posts and no conspiracy theories yet, what’s wrong with you people?

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23
schmeah 12:03 pm
27 Oct 10
#

Cue the pensioner onslaught! I do believe I have heard it all – plastic bags are an assault against the aged pensioner! Plastic bags are not going to send you to the poor house, a lot of bad habits or unnecessary wastage might however, send everyone to the poor house.

A lot of people use plastic bags for bins, so everyone, not just pensioners, are going to have to find an alternative! And how much will these bags cost? 10 cents, 50 cents? Why don’t you buy some green bags and then occasionally resort to buying the odd plastic bag for your bin liners?

Or, just go to the supermarket and buy bin liners like everyone else!!!

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24
cmdwedge 12:23 pm
27 Oct 10
#

KB1971 said :

TVStar said :

Does Lin Hatfield Dodds still have here 4wd?

All cars are environmentally unfriendly, not just 4WD’s.

I would wager that my little Honda Jazz is more environmentally friendly than LH-D’s V8 4WD. It’s just amazing to see the Greens defend the indefensible. Yes, all cars are environmentally unfriendly. Are they EQUALLY environmentally unfriendly? Or are you just butthurt that the Greens spent $500K on a campaign which netted exactly 0 seats?

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25
p1 12:24 pm
27 Oct 10
#

Why do people need those placky bags in the veggie section? I put snow peas, beans, etc in the paper bags they provide for mushrooms, and just toss the rest of the veggies in together.

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26
Holditz 12:26 pm
27 Oct 10
#

You know, despite a year’s warning and ample time to adapt, people are still going to roll up at the cash register on 1 November 2011 and ask “where’s the plastic bags?” And when they are told, they will say, “I wasn’t told this! When did this happen?”

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27
frontrow 12:30 pm
27 Oct 10
#

Is this going to get rid of plastic bags or are the supermarkets going to start using 36 micron bags?

Will there be inspectors?

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28
KB1971 12:34 pm
27 Oct 10
#

TVStar said :

KB1971 said :

What does a first class ticket have to do with the environment?

I can’t argue with stupidity. Sorry.

What yours?

So, instead of actually backing up your points when challenged you just resort to a personal attack?

Stupid is as stupid does………

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29
Thumper 12:36 pm
27 Oct 10
#

Or are you just butthurt that the Greens spent $500K on a campaign which netted exactly 0 seats?

That’s one of the funnier things I’ve read this month.

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30
KB1971 12:57 pm
27 Oct 10
#

cmdwedge said :

KB1971 said :

TVStar said :

Does Lin Hatfield Dodds still have here 4wd?

All cars are environmentally unfriendly, not just 4WD’s.

I would wager that my little Honda Jazz is more environmentally friendly than LH-D’s V8 4WD. It’s just amazing to see the Greens defend the indefensible. Yes, all cars are environmentally unfriendly. Are they EQUALLY environmentally unfriendly? Or are you just butthurt that the Greens spent $500K on a campaign which netted exactly 0 seats?

Agreed. Some more than others but people tend to think that drving a small car is a magic bullet.

Some examples of the lack of equality when people look at 4WD’s (given it is only in the last 5 years that 4 cylinder vehicles have become uber fuel efficient, anyone remember the 2.6 Magna?)

Fuel cost: Yes there is a fair difference in fuel cost with some 4wd’s such as the V8 Landcruiser using near 20lt/100km. That is an extreme, most COMMON 4wd’s now have common rail direct injection diesel engines with a prticulate filter. The Nissan Pathfinder comes to mind, used 11l/100 around town, not much more than say a Mazda 6 with its 4 cylinder engine. Smaller front wheel drive cars use a lot less but I might also add the fuel consumption is a variable thing.

Tyre cost: most cars that are not 4wd’s will get about 30-40,000km from a set of tyres. 4wd’s can get consistently 80-100,000km from a set of tyres (depending on tyre choice some get more).

Brake pad life: Small cars can get exceptional brake pad wear, I have seen a Nissan Pulsar get 120,000km out of a set of pads. 4WD’s also get similar brake pad wear, I have a mate with a 1993 Toyota Hulux, 290,000km on its original brake pads. Brake pad wear is also variable due to driving styles. Falcons & Commodores, I replaced a set of pads at 9,000km in a Falcon once.

Overall vehicle quality: many 4wd’s are built stronger & last longer that your average 2wd car reducing the amount of natural resources required to build another one (I am not taking the original drain on resources in this statement, just the follow on.)

Battries: the batteries in a hybrid car are more environmentally unfriendly that the car itself.

I could go on.

I was not really having a go at the Green thing as I am not actually a supporter of the Greens, I was having a poke at an unsubstantiated comment made by a goose who does not appear to know what they are talking about.

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