Advertisement

31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags

By 28 October 2010 105

[First filed: Oct 27, 2010 @ 10:31]

plastic bags

Simon Corbell has announced the end of light plastic shopping bags with the final ban to be in place from 1 November next year.

Before panicking bear in mind there will be many exemptions:

The Plastic Shopping Bags Ban Bill 2010 will ban the supply of plastic shopping bags of 35 microns or less, generally the type distributed through supermarkets, grocery stores and takeaway food outlets.

A range of bags will be unaffected by the ban, including barrier bags of the type dispensed from a roll to hold items such as fruit or meat and heavier retail bags used in department, footwear and clothing stores.

The Government expects that retailers will provide a range of bags to consumers to replace light weight plastic bags including reuseable ‘green’ bags, paper bags and biodegradable bags which meet Australian Standard AS 4736-2006. The sale of plastic bin liners for waste containers in the home is unaffected by the ban.

I’m still not sure how we’re getting greasy take-away home without making a mess in the car, but we’re going to find out.

UPDATE: The Greens’ Caroline Le Couteur has expressed her pleasure at this piece of Green policy being adopted.

Please login to post your comments
105 Responses to
31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags
avengerness 8:10 pm
27 Oct 10
#61

PantsMan said :

Jethro said :


Now the other 99.999% of crap we do to the earth can be forgotten.

+1

Proudof Canberra said :

This is becomming a totalitarian fascist state.

Stupid.Stupid.Stupid

+1

+2+2

georgesgenitals 8:12 pm
27 Oct 10
#62

That’s a top idea – I’ll buy one next month.

Deref 8:26 pm
27 Oct 10
#63

Could someone more knowledgeable please explain how the plastic bags that I buy to line my bins are not nearly as bad as the ones I’m given to line my bins?

Thanks.

I-filed 8:55 pm
27 Oct 10
#64

Amanda Hugankis said :

The only other ‘environmental’ solution I can see is just wrap these up in newspaper, and place on the countertop till we go out to our wheelie bins/hoppers.

Sigh – and when there are no longer newspapers, what then?

chrisi 9:10 pm
27 Oct 10
#65

what a waste of time and money. oh well, at least people will feel happy thinking they are making a difference. i’m all for making changes that actually improve the environment, but can someone please explain to me how this move will REDUCE plastic bags in landfill? People need to put rubbish into something, and if not for shopping bags it will be actual rubbish bags purchased (making companies like Glad very happy).

all this does is help the bottom line for companies…. woolies gets to sell cotton bags, and rubbish bag makers get to sell more units.

here’s a bright idea…. how about bringing in legislation that reduces wasteful and non biodegradible packaging? less plastics used = less plastics to throw away.

but no no no… dont actually make legislation that makes a difference, lets just all feel happy in the false knowledge that we are making a difference. this costs the government nothing, but earns it ‘green votes’ from people who really have no idea how ineffective this measure really is.

Thumper 9:15 pm
27 Oct 10
#66

This is the end of the world as we know it.

georgesgenitals 9:16 pm
27 Oct 10
#67

I-filed said :

Amanda Hugankis said :

The only other ‘environmental’ solution I can see is just wrap these up in newspaper, and place on the countertop till we go out to our wheelie bins/hoppers.

Sigh – and when there are no longer newspapers, what then?

What is this heresy?

el 9:27 pm
27 Oct 10
#68

Amanda Hugankis said :

The only other ‘environmental’ solution I can see is just wrap these up in newspaper, and place on the countertop till we go out to our wheelie bins/hoppers.

I-filed said :

Sigh – and when there are no longer newspapers, what then?

Well, I would’ve thought that was obvious – counter-tops and benches worldwide will become overrun with used tampons, society will decay even further, and the reptoids will finally enact their evil plan for world domination.

On the flipside, I believe the reptoids have different ideas about publicly funded artwork and cycle lanes.

Thumper 9:29 pm
27 Oct 10
#69

“Sigh – and when there are no longer newspapers, what then?”

What is this ‘newspaper’ that you speak of?

sepi 9:39 pm
27 Oct 10
#70

noone i know is saying that becuase we are banning plastic bags we can do whatever else we like guilt free.

This is a step in the right direction – about time too.

No single action is going to be dramatic, but lots of things like this will add up to a result.

Bags you have had to pay for will be more likely to be used and reused, rather than easily disposed of as there are always more turning up. You might even find you are starting to use other bags, such as bread bags, for a second purpose.

CraigT 10:17 pm
27 Oct 10
#71

I recently bought takeaway from a great Indian place in Melbourne and waqs impressed that it was packed up in a custom-made thick cardboard box for carrying home. Very handy.

That aside, I am thrilled about this news – all the dolphins in Lake Burley Griffin are now safe from death by plastic bag.

Thank god our leaders are addressing the things that really matter: perverted marriages and bans on plastic bags. This society of ours is clearly built to last.

cleo 10:35 pm
27 Oct 10
#72

Why should one have to pick up dog poo, it’s environment friendly, isn’t it, honestly it’s becoming a communist country

bd84 11:21 pm
27 Oct 10
#73

Oh all thses poor souls getting their knickers in a twist about losing their precious bin liners and actually having to purchase some. Boo fricken hoo. All you need is one bin inside the house, the type of bin liners for that bin are already sold in the supermarket. You will actually spend money to buy them and just have to get off your lazy asses and walk to it to dispose of your waste.

People have thought getting a free plastic bag with their shopping is their god given right for too long. A plastic bag for their chocolate bar, loaf of bread, bottle of milk complete with handle, a packet of chips, a packet of cigarettes. Heard every excuse in the book, no plastic bags do not keep your cold foods cold, yes you do not need to triple bag your 1.25L bottle of coke. It really is rediculous, to a point where I even think its a good idea to ban them when I’m not even normally that environmentally minded.

Build an environmentally friendly bridge and get over it. You can cry a river to go under it for the next 12 months anyway, just do it quietly.

kakosi 11:28 pm
27 Oct 10
#74

Window dressing – completely meaningless given the amount of packaging of thousands of products in supermarkets. At least shopping bags served a purpose as opposed to most of the packaging of items everyone buys. This is a smokescreen to hide the real problems of plastic packaging and make people think change is occurring. They’ll never go after manufacturers who will keep wrapping products in several layers of plastic and paper just to make them look pretty.

3Jane 5:11 am
28 Oct 10
#75

bd84, some people don’t have lazy asses, some have sick asses or they are old, but I think technology will help us all.

One day, all packaging will be made of cornstarch. I’ve bought greeting cards in cornstarch bags.

3Jane 7:37 am
28 Oct 10
#76

Amanda Hugankis said :

That’s good – cos I sure as hell dont want to start trying to compost tampons/pads and what-have-you. The only other ‘environmental’ solution I can see is just wrap these up in newspaper, and place on the countertop till we go out to our wheelie bins/hoppers.

Amanda, me neither! I never thought of newspaper; good idea.

I save the small plastic bags which I would be throwing out anyway, eg bread bags and carefully-opened toilet paper/biscuit packaging etc. With the transparent plastic bags, I put the item in, give the bag a twist, and put the item in again, then tie it. This ‘double bags’ it to guard against holes in the bag and identification of the item.

I also carefully open envelopes so I have a stock of them to use for this sort of thing.

CraigT 7:42 am
28 Oct 10
#77

Real change will have occurred when people are eating seasonal local produce instead of produce that’s been trucked back and forth across the country for weeks.

The government will need to do this by:
– increasing taxes on freight so the rest of us stop subsidising road maintenance for the benefit of trucks
– increasing the availability of land for growing food on – release land for market-gardens and put an end to postage-stamp-sized blocks with over-sized houses on them
– increased funding for education to teach children and adults the basics of horticulture and agriculture

Indi 9:00 am
28 Oct 10
#78

I’m so ‘Glad’ I haven’t bought into this issue – until I saw a dead possum down by the lakeside, wrapped in a plastic bag

Jim Jones 9:11 am
28 Oct 10
#79

Let me get this straight, because you won’t get some plastic bags free at the supermarkets anymore:

- the elderly will be driven to the poor house
- we’ve become a totalitarian state
- and, finally, we should never bother taking small steps to address environmental problems

Is that right?

3Jane 9:25 am
28 Oct 10
#80

Jim Jones said :

Let me get this straight, because you won’t get some plastic bags free at the supermarkets anymore:

- the elderly will be driven to the poor house
- we’ve become a totalitarian state
- and, finally, we should never bother taking small steps to address environmental problems

Is that right?

I think you got the first one wrong. My reference to the sick and elderly was to say that some people *do* need a bin in every room, because they can’t walk to the other end of the house every time they got rubbish or recycling. That is not to say that each bin has to be lined with a supermarket bag or a bought bin liner.

As for becoming a totalitarian state, some posters remind me of Americans, who, when introduced to the concept of water restrictions, say, “We would never stand for that!”.

Woody Mann-Caruso 9:36 am
28 Oct 10
#81

You say we have to start somewhere. Well, I say you’re starting us down a dark road…TO COMMUNISM. If it doesn’t fix everything at once with no inconvenience to me, I’m against it!

JoBo 9:44 am
28 Oct 10
#82

Target introduced this a while ago and I think its fantastic

The reason why you’ll be charged for shopping bags instead of getting them free is because they won’t be the usual plastic bags you’re used to, they will be biodegradable bags

I’m quite happy for the government to regulate this, unfortunately there are too many people in this world that only care for themselves & what’s easy for them rather than putting a bit of thought about the enviroment

Woody Mann-Caruso 10:20 am
28 Oct 10
#83

What is this ‘newspaper’ that you speak of?

It’s wonderful stuff. I print all my Google News articles on A3 so I can wrap up more tampons.

What’s black and white and read all over! Ha!

James-T-Kirk 10:30 am
28 Oct 10
#84

avengerness said :

Personally, I can’t use normal dog poo bags to pick up after my dog (they are too small) so I use shopping bags

Nooooo – The dog is doing a poo – RUN FOR IT!!!

That must be a *lot* of poo!

Thumper 10:37 am
28 Oct 10
#85

I tend to use plastic bags as bait when fishing for endangered sea turtles.

Not sure what i’ll use now.

Frano 11:07 am
28 Oct 10
#86

bd84 said :

Oh all thses poor souls getting their knickers in a twist about losing their precious bin liners and actually having to purchase some. Boo fricken hoo. All you need is one bin inside the house, the type of bin liners for that bin are already sold in the supermarket. You will actually spend money to buy them and just have to get off your lazy asses and walk to it to dispose of your waste.

bd84, you like many others on here just don’t get it. The purchase of bin liners is NOT the issue. I couldn’t care less if there were only 1cent for 1000 bags. I will buy them in future and then use them as bin liners (I will not walk out to my green bin every time, especially at night in mid winter as some on here have suggested)….these bags will then end up as land fill just like the shopping bags do currently. How banning of some bags but allowing the purchase of others will save the planet is beyond me?!!?

Jim Jones 11:21 am
28 Oct 10
#87

So, Frano, because one act won’t ‘save the planet’ in and of itself, we should completely give up on making small steps towards better environmental policy?

chewy14 12:12 pm
28 Oct 10
#88

Jim Jones said :

So, Frano, because one act won’t ‘save the planet’ in and of itself, we should completely give up on making small steps towards better environmental policy?

I think the point is, that this small step isn’t actually going to achieve anything.

It’s not better environmental policy if it doesn’t work.

Jim Jones 12:26 pm
28 Oct 10
#89

chewy14 said :

Jim Jones said :

So, Frano, because one act won’t ‘save the planet’ in and of itself, we should completely give up on making small steps towards better environmental policy?

I think the point is, that this small step isn’t actually going to achieve anything.

It’s not better environmental policy if it doesn’t work.

It will reduce the amount of plastic bags being used – that’s something.

As others have pointed out, it’s already been successfully implemented in other Australian states, and in other countries (strangely, none of these countries have burst into fire yet).

Amanda Hugankis 1:12 pm
28 Oct 10
#90

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

What is this ‘newspaper’ that you speak of?

It’s wonderful stuff. I print all my Google News articles on A3 so I can wrap up more tampons.

What’s black and white and read all over! Ha!

Bahahahahahahhahaha. Boom tish!

I’m investigating above suggestions to save the enviornment and my counter-top. Now we need suggestions on disposing of cat litter – Yowler Hugankis will only use crystals, and while biodegradeable, have no garden to dump them in. Outside groceries, we don’t shop a lot to be able to get other bags, so how to dispose environmentally? What do others do?

Follow
Follow The RiotACT
Get Premium Membership
Advertisement
The-RiotACT.com Newsletter Sign Up

Images of Canberra

Advertisement
Sponsors
RiotACT Proudly Supports
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.