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31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags

By 28 October 2010 105

[First filed: Oct 27, 2010 @ 10:31]

plastic bags

Simon Corbell has announced the end of light plastic shopping bags with the final ban to be in place from 1 November next year.

Before panicking bear in mind there will be many exemptions:

The Plastic Shopping Bags Ban Bill 2010 will ban the supply of plastic shopping bags of 35 microns or less, generally the type distributed through supermarkets, grocery stores and takeaway food outlets.

A range of bags will be unaffected by the ban, including barrier bags of the type dispensed from a roll to hold items such as fruit or meat and heavier retail bags used in department, footwear and clothing stores.

The Government expects that retailers will provide a range of bags to consumers to replace light weight plastic bags including reuseable ‘green’ bags, paper bags and biodegradable bags which meet Australian Standard AS 4736-2006. The sale of plastic bin liners for waste containers in the home is unaffected by the ban.

I’m still not sure how we’re getting greasy take-away home without making a mess in the car, but we’re going to find out.

UPDATE: The Greens’ Caroline Le Couteur has expressed her pleasure at this piece of Green policy being adopted.

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105 Responses to 31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags
#91
sepi1:13 pm, 28 Oct 10

Frano – do you think All plastic shopping bags are used as bin liners? Every single one?

Where is all that rubbish coming from. Surely after you consume all the food you’ve carried home, there should be a bit less to go back out to the bin in the empty bag?

And to those commenting about supermarkets overpackaging food (eg – 8 cheery tomatoes in a plastic tray inside a plastic sleeve etc), I agree. We can go after them next.

#92
Thoroughly Smashed1:50 pm, 28 Oct 10

Proudof Canberra said :

This is becomming a totalitarian fascist state.

Hahahahahahahaha.

#93
chewy142:22 pm, 28 Oct 10

sepi said :

Frano – do you think All plastic shopping bags are used as bin liners? Every single one?

Where is all that rubbish coming from. Surely after you consume all the food you’ve carried home, there should be a bit less to go back out to the bin in the empty bag?

And to those commenting about supermarkets overpackaging food (eg – 8 cheery tomatoes in a plastic tray inside a plastic sleeve etc), I agree. We can go after them next.

I think the last statistic I read was that 80% of households re-used their plastic bags for other purposes (don’t have a source). Obviously that doesn’t account for all plastic bags.

What I really don’t like about this policy is the banning aspect.
I would have no problem if the government was able to put a levy on plastic bags so that those who were using plastic bags had to pay for them.
Unfortunately they don’t have the power to do it.

#94
el2:31 pm, 28 Oct 10

Thumper said :

I tend to use plastic bags as bait when fishing for endangered sea turtles.

Not sure what i’ll use now.

Tampons, naturally.

#95
3Jane5:01 pm, 28 Oct 10

chewy14 said :

I think the point is, that this small step isn’t actually going to achieve anything.

Some initiates are just to remind you of a larger problem. (Nudging?) I’m not saying this is one of them, but if people are reminded to ‘save the planet’ every time they buy something, I have no problem with it.

#96
Grrrr5:12 pm, 28 Oct 10

Frano said :

However, what about situations where you make an impromptu run into the shop. Such as:
1. You get off the bus after work. You have a 5/10 minute walk home. You then decide to duck into the supermarket to get milk, bread, eggs, vegemite. Not a major shop, but you can’t really carry these items by yourself..

Yes, you can. You just need to plan ahead. I planned ahead years ago by buying and always travelling with a bag that when empty is light and not too large – but can fit a slab of beer.

This issue is all about forcing change on people. Unfortunately there are plenty of people not keen to otherwise tolerate losing some degree of convenience, or lacking enough foresight to prevent being inconvenienced, and without the imagination to see how easily alternatives can be arranged.

#97
sepi5:51 pm, 28 Oct 10

Or you can use one of the cardboard boxes the supermarket has heaps of.

#98
Jethro7:05 pm, 28 Oct 10

Jim Jones said :

Let me get this straight, because you won’t get some plastic bags free at the supermarkets anymore:

- the elderly will be driven to the poor house
- we’ve become a totalitarian state
- and, finally, we should never bother taking small steps to address environmental problems

Is that right?

Not exactly. Small steps such as these are taken in place of much larger and more difficult steps. They replace them. Where is the conversation about limiting economic growth and consumption in general?
It will never occur as long as we think our plastic bag-less, Prius driving, garden composting ‘little steps’ are making a difference.

#99
Pork Hunt7:36 pm, 28 Oct 10

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

What is this ‘newspaper’ that you speak of?

It’s wonderful stuff. I print all my Google News articles on A3 so I can wrap up more tampons.

I hope I never meet a woman who uses A3 tampons.
I might only have a wee organ but it was not meant to played in a cathedral…

#100
Jivrashia12:27 pm, 02 Nov 10

Like this guy says, take your canvas bags to the supermarket.

#101
bethybobs10:50 pm, 03 Nov 10

CraigT said :

Real change will have occurred when people are eating seasonal local produce instead of produce that’s been trucked back and forth across the country for weeks.

The government will need to do this by:
- increasing taxes on freight so the rest of us stop subsidising road maintenance for the benefit of trucks
- increasing the availability of land for growing food on – release land for market-gardens and put an end to postage-stamp-sized blocks with over-sized houses on them
- increased funding for education to teach children and adults the basics of horticulture and agriculture

I was surprised by how many people posting say they buy their veges and fruit from the supermarket. I am not even sure its real food sometimes.

#102
dvaey11:10 am, 11 Nov 10

Seems Im a bit late to the party, but how will this work for the disabled? Sure, an able-bodied person might be able to easily carry a box or paper bag of their goodies, but what happens for the little old lady on a walking-frame, who needs to buy a couple of items? Does she have to use a box? Does she have to pay 10c, because she is physically unable to carry the items without the assistance of a bag? Is she required to carry her own bags with her, just in-case she decides to make a purchase?

What about people on bicycles? Are you likely to be able to carry a cardboard box on your handlebars? What about parents with prams? Its much easier to hang a plastic bag off the pram handle than balance a box above your baby’s head.

#103
Jim Jones11:37 am, 11 Nov 10

Disabled people can use cloth bags or whatever else type of bag they might own: they’re disabled, not stupid.

It’s easier to carry things with prams (most have ample cargo space).

The elderly are usually much better at planning ahead for shopping trips than their younger cohorts.

Honestly, it’s just getting rid of plastic bags, it’s not some sort of human rights abuse. The sky isn’t going to fall and Nazis won’t be riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood.

#104
colourful sydney rac11:59 am, 11 Nov 10

Jim Jones said :

Disabled people can use cloth bags or whatever else type of bag they might own: they’re disabled, not stupid.

It’s easier to carry things with prams (most have ample cargo space).

The elderly are usually much better at planning ahead for shopping trips than their younger cohorts.

Honestly, it’s just getting rid of plastic bags, it’s not some sort of human rights abuse. The sky isn’t going to fall and Nazis won’t be riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood.

+1

#105
Holditz12:13 pm, 11 Nov 10

Jim Jones said :

Honestly, it’s just getting rid of plastic bags, it’s not some sort of human rights abuse. The sky isn’t going to fall and Nazis won’t be riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood.

How is Nazis riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood a human right abuse? Personally I reckon that would be worth a looksee.

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