Advertisement

A starter guide to You Are Here

By 5 March 2012 2

With a daunting program for You Are Here in 2012 the organisers have sent thought a starter pack of events to get you into the groove:


i don't really read

I Don’t Really Read

“I don’t really read books, takes too long when you can just watch the movie.”

Come and join some of Canberra’s best writers and performers for a delightful afternoon snuggled around an imaginary fire. We ask Scissors, Paper, Pen, new journal Burley, new mag Us Folk and lip magazine to pick their favourite local writers to come and read you a story.

Thursday March 8, 5pm – 7.30pm, Smith’s Alternative Bookstore

Here’s a quote from Zoya Patel, who is reading for the event:
“I love the Canberra literary scene – I think there’s a strong (albeit small) community of writers, and some interesting publications doing the rounds. I feel like there’s a bit of a lull at the moment, so I’m hoping there are some new Canberran journals/mags/zines/blogs that are going to crop up soon. I can’t really say much for the future, as my time here is limited now, but I look forward to seeing it grow.”

The idea for the event came from a post that popped up in my facebook feed — I figured I would talk to local publications and events and get them to send me some of their favourite writers. LIP Magazine is sending along their editor Zoya Patel, new journal Burley has selected Anita Patel, and Scissors / Paper / Pen has got Ashley Orr, Zoe Konovalov and Irma Gold — all great local writers.


resonance

Ressonance 1.1

resonance 1.1 is a real-time performance installation of movement and sound manifesting the textures of materials not normally associated with performance. The interaction between the mediums and audiences in this responsive framework creates an unusual performative space. For You Are Here, choreographer Adelina Larsson presents two works from this series.

resonance 1.1 places the performer upon a bed of pebbles, creating sound to be processed and manipulated live by composer Rueben Ingall. This new soundscape stimulates improvised movement from the performer, in turn affecting the sound with continual, dramatic tension.

Friday March 9 6:30pm, Gallery 4 Canberra Museum and Gallery


Bubble Wrap

Bubble Wrap finds the performer in high heels on a surface of bubble wrap, interacting precariously with the highly responsive material.
Choreographer – Adelina Larsson
Performers – Rueben Ingall and Alison Plevey

Saturday March 10, 2pm, Gallery 4 Canberra Museum and Gallery


lunchbox listening

Lunchbox Listening

Lunchtimes during You Are here, students and alumni from the ANU School of Music present their brand of young, contemporary chamber music.

All too often ‘classical’ music is immediately lumped with ‘high’ culture. The formal procedure of attending a recital at a concert hall, with allocated seating, and designated times for applause, can be alienating and downright painful. During You Are Here, local percussionist Yvonne Lam and her contemporaries are helping modern chamber music to be more accessible by removing this associated formality.

Percussion as an instrument is not only appreciated for its sonic possibilities, but also its aesthetic and theatrical elements, which makes for a truly captivating performance. Imagine a marimba hooked up to a digital delay system, creating a multi-marimba sonic illusion. Or six players scattered around a room, each with their own percussion set-up of large concert bass-drums, metal pipes, and ‘found’ percussion objects, as part of a large-scale percussion ensemble piece.

Feel free to bring your lunch and expand your musical horizons, all in the course of your average weekday lunch hour!

The Newsroom, Friday March 9 12.30 – 2 (with Impro Theatre ACT); Wednesday March 14 12.30 – 1.30; Thursday March 15 12.30 – 1.30; Friday March 16 (with The Landlords)

Please login to post your comments
2 Responses to A starter guide to You Are Here
#1
Holden Caulfield4:57 pm, 05 Mar 12

Now the world don’t move to the beat of just one drum…

#2
dpm6:38 pm, 05 Mar 12

“All too often ‘classical’ music is immediately lumped with ‘high’ culture….”

If I may make a segue (no, not the kind Simon wants to ride around the lake, as mentioned in another post today) from your above comment, I think a terrible example of this is the toddler program ‘Little Einstein’.
Apparently to ensure you raise your own little Einstein, they’ll need to know all about classical music (composer of the day) and high art (artist of the day). What a cliche! So lame…

Follow
Follow The RiotACT
Get Premium Membership
Advertisement
The-RiotACT.com Newsletter Sign Up

Images of Canberra

Advertisement
Sponsors
RiotACT Proudly Supports
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.