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ACT Virtual Community Cabinet: How to do it better

By 29 July 2011 2

While I applaud the idea of using technology to make community cabinet meetings more accessible and representative of the community, we used the wrong technology.  Twitter is great for discussion, but it is terrible for ensuring that the time is spent answering the best questions.  It also won’t scale if any decent number of people get involved.

I have created a google moderator discussion for next time and seeded it with a few questions I would like answered: http://www.google.com/moderator/#15/e=a1450&t=a1450.40

Rioters please submit your own questions and vote the best ones up!  I’d love to see the top questions answered in a live video stream on youtube, with twitter used for real-time commentary from the masses.  As we found out, meaningful answers can’t be delivered in 140 characters.

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2 Responses to ACT Virtual Community Cabinet: How to do it better
#1
vanaalst9:48 am, 29 Jul 11

Like you riotous, I like Google Moderate, but is has it’s limitations — and there would not be a large enough proportion of Canberran’s with Google accounts (even some strongly opposed to using anything google).

The idea of asking questions in that format though is excellent, and getting punters to rank them gives a better sense of what the broader community wants answered.

The ACTVCC exercise of this week was a good, and brave, start by the ACT Government, but it will be unworkable if 2,3 or 10 times the number of people tune in to the discussion and add questions.
I think the ACT Govt needs to look at a number of different platforms and options, and perhaps trial a range of them (innovation = trial things quickly, fail quickly, learn from mistakes and move on.)

#2
johnboy10:25 am, 29 Jul 11

I’m not sure this is soluble as the more credible a platform is the more the parties will try to dominate it.

At the end of the day the Legislative Assembly is paid at great expense to be the chamber these arguments are supposed to be heard in, even that appears to have been co-opted.

Which is not to say that technology shouldn’t be enhancing democracy (although any such enhancement is unlikely as it would be at the expense of the entrenched players), just that it’s a bigger question than the IT department is supposed to be wrestling with.

Having said that it could well be that the RiotACT email interviews time has come again.

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