ACTION network changes for 2012

By 22 March, 2012 43

bus interchange

Our bus network has announced their tweaks to the system for this year.

The new bus network is expected to commence on Monday 28 May 2012. All timetables will change as a result of the new network. Timetables are currently being updated and will be available two weeks prior to the commencement of the new network from the ACTION website, MyWay Centres, Woden and Tuggeranong Bus Stations and Canberra Connect Shopfronts.

The new network, Network 12, is the first step along the way to delivering the improvements outlined in the Transport for Canberra Strategy. This round of changes will improve the current network and further planning is underway for a more extensive review.

The Greens have expressed some pleasure with the direction this is going.

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43 Responses to ACTION network changes for 2012
#31
damien haas12:29 pm, 23 Mar 12

YOU MAY EXIT VIA THE REAR DOOR OF AN ACTION BUS

I just thought i’d capitalise that, as it has been permitted for passengers to exit via the rear door of an ACTION bus ‘at the drivers discretion’ since late last year. I have sighted the drivers circular which announced this world first public transport breakthrough. i asked a driver recently if passengers were exercising their right to exit via this novel method and he said ‘No, we have trained them too well…’.

So passengers – this afternoon as you travel home, exercise your new freedom (at the drivers discretion…).

#32
damien haas12:32 pm, 23 Mar 12

jase! said :

while i agree that something needs to be done to prioritise public transport down northbourne as a proponent of light rail I’d love to see how the cost of it would justify it over installing a T-Way type lane (and hopefully bike lane) down the middle of the traffic islands. A single T-way lane that is tidal flow based seems to be a much more flexible option and wouldn’t cost a mint. However if you can provide solid reasoning for how light rail would stack up both on a functional level and cost level I’d love to hear it

The ACT Government completed the study you requested, i suggest you read the submission to Infrastructure Australia in support of Light Rail for the ACT.

Oh, they want someone else to pay for it. They need all the cash for roads – especially that big ring road plan.

#33
Gungahlin Al11:07 pm, 23 Mar 12

damien haas said :

YOU MAY EXIT VIA THE REAR DOOR OF AN ACTION BUS

I just thought i’d capitalise that, as it has been permitted for passengers to exit via the rear door of an ACTION bus ‘at the drivers discretion’ since late last year. I have sighted the drivers circular which announced this world first public transport breakthrough. i asked a driver recently if passengers were exercising their right to exit via this novel method and he said ‘No, we have trained them too well…’.

So passengers – this afternoon as you travel home, exercise your new freedom (at the drivers discretion…).

Thanks Damien. I’m thinking leaflet drop on crowded buses for election campaign… :)

Jasel: this is the report to which Damien refers:
http://www.tams.act.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/145751/ACT_Light_Rail.pdf

And here is the analysis of the report I wrote at the time. Little has changed except the government is now sounding more open to the idea whereas before under other transport ministers it was obviously just mouthing the words until you went away.
http://www.gcc.asn.au/News/Planning-development/act-misses-light-rail-opportunity.html

#34
jase!11:57 pm, 23 Mar 12

neither of you really answered my question Al and the report linked doesn’t either, on page 43 it even suggests that dedicated T-way’s might be a good idea but it hasn’t really been looked at and the acquisition cost would be much lower (exactly what I was asking).

to me it seems the light rail collective want the rolled gold option or nothing whereas the northbourne issue could at least be partially solved quickly and without massive expense with a T-way but that is poo pooed because it isn’t the light rail solution

#35
Bramina10:14 am, 24 Mar 12

jase! said :

while i agree that something needs to be done to prioritise public transport down northbourne as a proponent of light rail I’d love to see how the cost of it would justify it over installing a T-Way type lane (and hopefully bike lane) down the middle of the traffic islands. A single T-way lane that is tidal flow based seems to be a much more flexible option and wouldn’t cost a mint. However if you can provide solid reasoning for how light rail would stack up both on a functional level and cost level I’d love to hear it

There are several differences between busses and trams. On the con side, trams lines are relatively expensive (the GDE wasn’t cheap either) and they are limited in where they can drive.

But where trams really beat busses is in their capacity. A 50 passenger seat bus can load about a passenger every five or six seconds – about one 50 passenger load every five minutes.

A tram can load 300 people in just five minutes.

So the capacity of a bus network is constrained at around a sixth of the capacity of a tram network.

If we want large numbers of people travelling on public transport, simply we have to move away from busses on the main routes. They can never have the capacity.

#36
Bussie12:14 pm, 24 Mar 12

Bramina said :

jase! said :

while i agree that something needs to be done to prioritise public transport down northbourne as a proponent of light rail I’d love to see how the cost of it would justify it over installing a T-Way type lane (and hopefully bike lane) down the middle of the traffic islands. A single T-way lane that is tidal flow based seems to be a much more flexible option and wouldn’t cost a mint. However if you can provide solid reasoning for how light rail would stack up both on a functional level and cost level I’d love to hear it

There are several differences between busses and trams. On the con side, trams lines are relatively expensive (the GDE wasn’t cheap either) and they are limited in where they can drive.

But where trams really beat busses is in their capacity. A 50 passenger seat bus can load about a passenger every five or six seconds – about one 50 passenger load every five minutes.

A tram can load 300 people in just five minutes.

So the capacity of a bus network is constrained at around a sixth of the capacity of a tram network.

If we want large numbers of people travelling on public transport, simply we have to move away from busses on the main routes. They can never have the capacity.

A bus that seats 50 can stand around 20. An articulated bus can take 110. Less than trams sure but not as much less as you claim.

#37
HenryBG12:54 pm, 24 Mar 12

Bussie said :

Bramina said :

A 50 passenger seat bus can load about a passenger every five or six seconds – about one 50 passenger load every five minutes.

A tram can load 300 people in just five minutes.

So the capacity of a bus network is constrained at around a sixth of the capacity of a tram network.

A bus that seats 50 can stand around 20. An articulated bus can take 110. Less than trams sure but not as much less as you claim.

Good grief.

The point is: the extra 20 bus passengers will take an additional 2 minutes to load. (Even longer if some passengers get on and hang around the entrance, thus constricting the ingress of further passengers. Fnidiots.) The 110-seat bus will take a total of 10-11 minutes to load 1/3rd the number of passengers a tram can take on in 5 minutes.

What’s more, the idiots who implemented Myway have introduced further delays in the form of requiring that people swipe off, thus drastically slowing down the off-loading of passengers. I’d love to see a video of the meeting where that particular bit of genius was devised…

#38
jase!2:43 pm, 24 Mar 12

HenryBG said :

What’s more, the idiots who implemented Myway have introduced further delays in the form of requiring that people swipe off, thus drastically slowing down the off-loading of passengers. I’d love to see a video of the meeting where that particular bit of genius was devised…

agreed that it was a Muppet move

easy fix, entry only at the front of the bus, exit only at the back, people can swipe off at the back while others swipe on at the front

#39
Bussie12:22 pm, 25 Mar 12

HenryBG said :

What’s more, the idiots who implemented Myway have introduced further delays in the form of requiring that people swipe off, thus drastically slowing down the off-loading of passengers. I’d love to see a video of the meeting where that particular bit of genius was devised…

It’s so they know where people are going. It’s pretty common in public transport systems elsewhere.

#40
Gungahlin Al2:14 pm, 25 Mar 12

Bussie said :

HenryBG said :

What’s more, the idiots who implemented Myway have introduced further delays in the form of requiring that people swipe off, thus drastically slowing down the off-loading of passengers. I’d love to see a video of the meeting where that particular bit of genius was devised…

It’s so they know where people are going. It’s pretty common in public transport systems elsewhere.

Yeah I’m OK with the swipe off process. The data gained helps build a better service because actual trips can be captured rather than just start points and assumptions about destination.

Good idea though about exit from the rear if available.

#41
HenryBG2:58 pm, 25 Mar 12

Bussie said :

HenryBG said :

What’s more, the idiots who implemented Myway have introduced further delays in the form of requiring that people swipe off, thus drastically slowing down the off-loading of passengers. I’d love to see a video of the meeting where that particular bit of genius was devised…

It’s so they know where people are going. It’s pretty common in public transport systems elsewhere.

I realise that, and in those other systems there are zones which make swiping-off relevant – However, here, as implemented, swiping-off clearly fulfills no operational purpose so I wonder if it isn’t transparently obvious that slowing down an entire mass transit system(ie, handicapping its core function) for the purpose of capturing data (not even a peripheral function) is clearly ludicrous.

#42
Darkfalz3:43 pm, 25 Mar 12

Well, this puts the nail in the coffin for the idea of me purchasing a new house in Crace. So they’ve just tacked Crace onto the arse (Belconnen) end of a long ride through all the further out (from Civic) Gungahlin suburbs, negating the location being “10 minutes from the CBD”. You’d be better off catching one of the buses that go through North Lyneham, but that’d mean crossing Barton highway first. It’s a shame they can’t just stick some stops along Barton highway.

#43
Bramina9:11 pm, 26 Mar 12

HenryBG said :

Bussie said :

Bramina said :

A 50 passenger seat bus can load about a passenger every five or six seconds – about one 50 passenger load every five minutes.

A tram can load 300 people in just five minutes.

So the capacity of a bus network is constrained at around a sixth of the capacity of a tram network.

A bus that seats 50 can stand around 20. An articulated bus can take 110. Less than trams sure but not as much less as you claim.

Good grief.

The point is: the extra 20 bus passengers will take an additional 2 minutes to load. (Even longer if some passengers get on and hang around the entrance, thus constricting the ingress of further passengers. Fnidiots.) The 110-seat bus will take a total of 10-11 minutes to load 1/3rd the number of passengers a tram can take on in 5 minutes.

What’s more, the idiots who implemented Myway have introduced further delays in the form of requiring that people swipe off, thus drastically slowing down the off-loading of passengers. I’d love to see a video of the meeting where that particular bit of genius was devised…

Yeah, my point was about route capacity – as in the number of people you can push through a transport route per hour. It wasn’t about the seating capacity of a single vehicle.

Busses might have the capacity to carry 5-600 people per hour along a route because of loading.

A lane of cars, travelling with a two second gap can carry 1800 cars per hour. However obstructions like traffic lights reduce this considerably.

A tram line can carry at most perhaps 4000-4500 people per hour.

But not only do trams add more capacity, they can add large amounts of capacity at a lower cost than any other form of transport.

The GDE for example has two lanes. At most it can carry 3600 cars per hour (is that optimistic? does it flow well in peak hour?). And it cost well in excess of $300 million.

The government could have built a tramline to Gungahlin for perhaps $250-300 million in total including the trams. The tramway could have carried 4000-4500 people per hour.

They could also build tramlines to Belconnen, Woden, and Tuggeranong for around $200 million each, with each line having a capacity once again of 4,000-4,500 people per hour.

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