Advertisement

Retrial over alleged aggravated robbery with a syringe (due to court error)

By 2 May 2008 15

Ms ***** (whose name shall remain unpublished, in light of pending court case), of Canberra, was charged late last year with the alleged aggravated robbery of two young adults at Garema Place Commonwealth Bank ATM, Canberra City.

The couple were returning home from a night socialising with friends in the city, when they were confronted by Ms *****, who allegedly brandished a blood-filled syringe and threatened to “stab a dirty fit” into the necks of the victims if they did not hand over the money withdrawn from the ATM. The couple promptly complied with their agressor’s alleged threat.

Shortly after the robbery, one of the victims called “000″ from their mobile phone (which apparently resulted in requests from Ms ***** to “hand over the phone” as well, until she heard the victim asking for police). At this point Ms *** allegedly began walking quickly away from the couple, and was chased on foot by one of the victims, who remained on the phone to ACT police, notifying the police of the Ms ***** location in the city until she was apprehended by officers in Braddon.

Ms *****, when charged, pleaded not guilty at the Magistrate’s court, which resulted in the escalation of the case to the Supreme Court. One day before trial, Ms ***** submitted a guilty plea to the charge of aggravated robbery, a plea accepted by the Judge presiding over the case.

It has since surfaced that an error was made by the courts in their acceptance of the guilty plea from the alleged offender. Ms *****, although pleading guilty to aggravated robbery, but did not admit to either possessing a syringe at any time, or threatening the couple, thus rendering her sentence invalid.

The couple involved in the alleged attack has been contacted by ACT policing, and will be summoned shortly to attend a retrial of the now case.

Please login to post your comments
15 Responses to Retrial over alleged aggravated robbery with a syringe (due to court error)
#1
neanderthalsis9:09 am, 02 May 08

Sounds like a five star cluster fcuk to me.

#2
Woody Mann-Caruso9:37 am, 02 May 08

You mean cf doesn’t stand for for ‘confer’ or coactus feci?

#3
Woody Mann-Caruso9:41 am, 02 May 08

Ah, now I remember the legal term I was looking for: perfututum, totally f*cked.

#4
Katie10:18 am, 02 May 08

This is beside the point, but I was under the impression 000 didn’t work from mobile phones and that one needs to dial 112 to connect to emergency services…

#5
fuzbats10:33 am, 02 May 08

000 Will work from mobiles as long as ‘your’ network has coverage. 112 will work from (GSM) mobiles as long as your phone can connect to *any* network.

I’m not sure how 112 is handled on non-GSM phones tho..

#6
smokey411:00 am, 02 May 08

Ms **** lawers must be loosing brownie points with the judges at a fast rate of knotts. After all they are also officers of the courts and responsible to make sure things are properly presented.

#7
freddie2814:33 pm, 02 May 08

112 on a mobile will connect you to the emergency operator in any country. 000 will not.

#8
scottie_5175:02 pm, 02 May 08

Ah, yes it will – I’ve called it myself. You just have to state which state and area you’re in and they put you through to police, ambo or fire.

#9
Spideydog5:31 pm, 02 May 08

112 is the universal “000″ or “911″ in ANY country. If you dial 000 in the US, your mobile phone will give you an uppercut.

#10
bd849:27 pm, 02 May 08

It’s time governments closed the “procedual errors” loopholes in the laws and removed the defence from these scum where someone forgets to check the box, dot the i and cross the t.

#11
Thumper12:02 am, 03 May 08

You idiots…

it’s 000

Simple. Ring triple zero.

Ask any bloody cop, ambo, firie, ses, whomever…

#12
barking toad12:17 am, 03 May 08

Soft.

Why didn’t they go for the new world record for kicking in the monologue!

#13
minime21:47 am, 03 May 08

Whoa!! Not so fast on the use of 000 in an emergency – such as getting robbed. Unless you know exactly where you are with a cross street, you are wasting lots of time. Same goes for dobbing in a drunken speedster [but you can't call on your mobile then :) ] or needing urgent medical assist and you just are not sure where you are.

Suggest calling ACT Police Communications on 131-444 and speak directly to a local cop. S/he will have a better idea of what “Need help at Westpac ATM bottom of Belco Mall” means than someone in another state. Same with a prang; you are all upset and such; so unless you know exactly where you are… 13144 will have an idea where “Outside Woolies servo at Gunghalin” is than 000 operator.

But 000 might be best for telling them where the remains of the piece of crap robber with a syringe are: “In the gutter at the corner of X and Y”. Two young woosy adults.

#14
smokey412:17 pm, 03 May 08

tripple 000 also require suburb as well as cross streets. Not so easy if you are unfamiliar with an area, near the boundary of Hume or where they want to build that new whats its name.
I used to have a different postal suburb as opposed to statutary suburb which occurred when local government boundaries were changed. A ring to triple O and give the postal address/suburb and the operator would not able to locate the address. This occurred several times until the postal boundaries were realigned. Triple O work on statutory boundaries.

#15
thecman5:12 pm, 03 May 08

Calling 000 will put you through to the 000 operator (a service provided by Telstra) who will ask what state you are in and what service you want – Police, Ambulance, Fire Brigade etc. They will then put you through to the relevant operations centre – which for Police in the ACT is Police Operations at Winchester Police Centre or ESA for the other services. If it is an emergency in the ACT requiring Police attendance call 000 not 131444 – the call will go to Police Operations providing you advise the 000 operator that you are in the ACT.

Sponsors
RiotACT Proudly Supports
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.