Advertisement

Can we have our baby Christened or Baptised at home?

By 2 December 2010 34

Hi All, just wondering if it is possible to have our baby Christened or Baptised at home (not 100% on the difference?), and if anyone can recommend a priest in Canberra who will do this?

We don’t attend church, and aren’t very religious but would like to have our daughter baptised in a private ceremony in our garden.

Thanks for your help :)

Please login to post your comments
34 Responses to Can we have our baby Christened or Baptised at home?
#1
neanderthalsis10:29 am, 02 Dec 10

I take it you’re after a Catholic service? If so, you can probably forget having the local Padre do the service unless there is some compelling reason for it not to be done in a church. You’ll most likely be required to attend a “class” or two on good religious parenting as well.

#2
p110:42 am, 02 Dec 10

Get yourself a civil celebrant, they’ll do whatever you like where ever you like, and not look at you funny if both godparents are male.

As neanderthalsis said, Catholics can be picky about where they will God Up you baby, although there is a few options out side the church. A commissioned ship in the navy works, I was christened on a submarine….

#3
KSSparent10:44 am, 02 Dec 10

Have you considered have a civil naming ceremony instead?

#4
thatsnotme10:45 am, 02 Dec 10

Gotta ask…if you’re not religious, don’t know the difference between a Christening and a Baptism…why are you bothering?

When my son turned one, along with his birthday we just did a small, completely informal naming ceremony for him in the backyard (on his birthday mainly because we hadn’t gotten our act together to do anything before then!) Chose a couple of good friends of ours to act as ‘godparents’ (so to speak), had them and our parents say a few words, and that was it. Nothing religious, nothing hippy about it, just a nice way to welcome him to the world.

If he ever decides that he wants a baptism or christening in the future, then that decision will be completely up to him.

#5
Erg011:05 am, 02 Dec 10

KSSparent said :

Have you considered have a civil naming ceremony instead?

I think this would be the way to go, churches aren’t quite as casual about baptisms as you seem to be.

#6
Jerry Atric11:18 am, 02 Dec 10

Traditionally Godparents were supposed to keep their Godchildren in shoes. Given your lack of Christian commitment, are you in fact attempting to reinstate this worthy practice?

Priests will baptise anywhere or at any time for anyone about to shuffle off the mortal coil.

#7
Jim Jones11:18 am, 02 Dec 10

Have an exorcism instead, much more fun.

#8
dtc11:40 am, 02 Dec 10

I have been to some naming ceremonies, as suggested by ‘thatsnotme’, and I reckon that is what you are after. They seem a bit hippy in concept but you run them as you want – use whatever speeches or promises etc you want (just like a civil wedding), have a BBQ or morning tea at your house or a local area of prettiness.

Baptising et al has no legal status; it does have status within the church (eg you cant take communion without having been baptised) but if the church is not relevant to you then why bother. As an unbaptised person, I can assure you it doesnt make me a lesser man… (I leave that to all my other ‘talents’)

#9
housebound11:50 am, 02 Dec 10

Christening/baptisms for babies are usually restricted to churches. If you are asking for a priest, you probably have a catholic background rather than protestant. I think you might find the water thing becomes an issue out of the church building itself. If it is important to you, why not just do the ceremony in a church then go home for the party?

Some church traditions have dedication ceremonies for babies. These ceremonies are similar to baptisms/christenings, but without the water. Those can be done anywhere, but you probably need to find someone willing to perform a religious ceremony for a family who is not religious.

Not too sure about the difference between a baptism/christening when it comes to babies – is it just how wet the poor thing gets?

#10
Amanda Hugankis12:23 pm, 02 Dec 10

I thought a christening was simply about a service that recognises and welcomes the child to the church and wider community, stops you going to pergatory, etc. Baptism seemed to me to be a commitment thing – that can be taken at any time in your life, no matter how old you are and for those who are right into their belief system. I think there is a bit about repentance in there too, so that might all be a bit presumptious if you’re talking about a little’un. Might also depend on the church and flavour of christianity.

Either way you go, they’re about christian life and commiting your child . If that isn’t what you are looking for for your child, then a welcoming or naming ceremony would be what you’re looking for.

#11
Captain RAAF1:09 pm, 02 Dec 10

Jim Jones said :

Have an exorcism instead, much more fun.

mmmm…pea soup! Are they in season?

#12
Bosworth1:23 pm, 02 Dec 10

make sure you don’t give any money to the church, they use the money to keep paedophiles out of jail.

#13
daddy1:34 pm, 02 Dec 10

Baptism is the first of the Christian Sacraments of Initialtion. It is generally performed in a church by a priest as that is the focal point of the religious community and the community is called upon to welcome and support the new member.

Having said that, Baptism can actually be performed by any Baptised person, a priest is not required, and can be done anywhere. The full rite of baptism does include commitments to be practicing members of the church so that must be considered along with the feeling of just wanting to have it done.

#14
georgesgenitals1:36 pm, 02 Dec 10

Most non-Catholic denominations would probably be happy to conduct the ceremony at home.

#15
Jethro1:43 pm, 02 Dec 10

If you are a Christian you can baptise him/her yourself. You don’t need a priest.
Although, why you would baptise your child is beyond me.
Particularly since the church abolsihed limbo…. (although I’m not sure what happened to all the babies that got sent there before it was abolished?)

#16
Brindabella2:06 pm, 02 Dec 10

daddy said :

Baptism is the first of the Christian Sacraments of Initialtion

Only if you subscribe to the Catholic version of Christianity.

#17
Mathman2:12 pm, 02 Dec 10

Jethro said :

Although, why you would baptise your child is beyond me.

About the only benefit is that most churches require at least one of the couple to be baptised in order to be able to be married in a church.

daddy said :

The full rite of baptism does include commitments to be practicing members of the church so that must be considered along with the feeling of just wanting to have it done.

I must admit, this is what turned us away from baptism for our kids. Having attended a friend’s kids baptism, we were very uncomfortable with the commitments the parents were asked to make – both from a belief and honesty point of view. In the end we had naming ceremonies for both our kids and we found that they were a much more personal and social event than the ‘batch job’ service provided by the church.

A tip for the inexperienced – write down the name of your child for the ceremony. What with the excitement of the day, meeting family and friends, organising the catering and keeping your child and other siblings quite during the ceremony, its not unknown to forget something at a critical moment – like the name of the child you are naming. A tad embarrassing when it gets to the bit ‘We name our child um, argh, oh whatshisname’.

#18
Holden Caulfield2:15 pm, 02 Dec 10

georgesgenitals said :

Most non-Catholic denominations would probably be happy to conduct the ceremony at home.

I would expect this to be the case. It was certainly the case when Mrs C and I tied the knot all those years ago (Catholic ceremony). We had a family friend, in fact he probably baptised me too, do the ceremony and he would have married us anywhere, but the locals wouldn’t allow us to do the deed outside a church, so to speak.

Sounds a bit daft, but Baptism *might* make it easier for junior to be accepted into a private (Catholic) school when the time comes, if that is a consideration.

Otherwise, don’t bother, and just go with what you want.

#19
neanderthalsis2:26 pm, 02 Dec 10

Jethro said :

If you are a Christian you can baptise him/her yourself. You don’t need a priest.
Although, why you would baptise your child is beyond me.
Particularly since the church abolsihed limbo…. (although I’m not sure what happened to all the babies that got sent there before it was abolished?)

They’re in a holding pattern around Saturn (hence the rings of stardust) waiting for admission to heaven; which has a “you must be this tall to ride” sign next to the gates.

#20
JessicaNumber2:28 pm, 02 Dec 10

How about a Wiccaning? I don’t quite understand what you expect to gain from initiating your child into a religion you have no intention of practicing but it might as well be an interesting one.

#21
p12:50 pm, 02 Dec 10

neanderthalsis said :

Jethro said :

If you are a Christian you can baptise him/her yourself. You don’t need a priest.
Although, why you would baptise your child is beyond me.
Particularly since the church abolsihed limbo…. (although I’m not sure what happened to all the babies that got sent there before it was abolished?)

They’re in a holding pattern around Saturn (hence the rings of stardust) waiting for admission to heaven; which has a “you must be this tall to ride” sign next to the gates.

I thought limbo was outsourced to India, was caught trying to re-enter illegally, and is not in a detention centre. Which makes sense when you think about it.

#22
LadyoftheLake3:00 pm, 02 Dec 10

The difference? Catholics get Baptised and other Christians get Christened…. If you don’t know the difference you really shouldn’t bother. Oh unless you want to get your kids in Catholic schools.

#23
p13:03 pm, 02 Dec 10

LadyoftheLake said :

The difference? Catholics get Baptised and other Christians get Christened…. If you don’t know the difference you really shouldn’t bother. Oh unless you want to get your kids in Catholic schools.

Really, I would have thought Baptists would get baptised and catholics, ermmm, licked?

#24
Roguelette4:30 pm, 02 Dec 10

Something else to consider (based on a friends experience) some priests will not christen a child if the parents are not married.

#25
housebound5:00 pm, 02 Dec 10

The thing about catholic school enrolments is 100% right – having your baby baptised gets you higher up the priority list. It can be the difference between getting into a catholic high school and not. Being enrolled in a catholic primary school isn’t always enough these days.

Of course, if there is no chance your child would go to a catholic high school, then it won’t matter. (And such a mercenary way to get your school of choice)

#26
Pork Hunt6:28 pm, 02 Dec 10

Wait till she 18 and give her the choice instead of labelling them this and that when they have no say.

#27
Fiona7:17 pm, 02 Dec 10

*head hurts*

I don’t get it.

Go the naming ceremony if you have to have something. I don’t get the religion thing, and many of the other commenters have good points about reasons that you won’t be able to do it at home.

#28
Jethro8:36 pm, 02 Dec 10

p1 said :

neanderthalsis said :

Jethro said :

If you are a Christian you can baptise him/her yourself. You don’t need a priest.
Although, why you would baptise your child is beyond me.
Particularly since the church abolsihed limbo…. (although I’m not sure what happened to all the babies that got sent there before it was abolished?)

They’re in a holding pattern around Saturn (hence the rings of stardust) waiting for admission to heaven; which has a “you must be this tall to ride” sign next to the gates.

I thought limbo was outsourced to India, was caught trying to re-enter illegally, and is not in a detention centre. Which makes sense when you think about it.

I believe India specialises in recycling babies.

#29
Jethro8:36 pm, 02 Dec 10

p1 said :

neanderthalsis said :

Jethro said :

If you are a Christian you can baptise him/her yourself. You don’t need a priest.
Although, why you would baptise your child is beyond me.
Particularly since the church abolsihed limbo…. (although I’m not sure what happened to all the babies that got sent there before it was abolished?)

They’re in a holding pattern around Saturn (hence the rings of stardust) waiting for admission to heaven; which has a “you must be this tall to ride” sign next to the gates.

I thought limbo was outsourced to India, was caught trying to re-enter illegally, and is not in a detention centre. Which makes sense when you think about it.

I believe Hinduism in India means that it specialises in recycling babies.

#30
liability9:27 pm, 02 Dec 10

@ housebound

You don’t have to be Catholic to be enrolled at a Catholic school. Probably 30% of students in Catholic schools are non-Catholic.

If you have have ever seen an enrollment form for a Catholic school you will see that there is no question as to whether the student has been baptised.

Follow
Follow The RiotACT
Advertisement
GET PREMIUM MEMBERSHIP

Are you in favour of Light Rail for Canberra?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

IMAGES OF CANBERRA

Advertisement
Sponsors
RiotACT Proudly Supports
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.