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Canberra’s leafy suburbs 7 degrees cooler than treeless hell?

By johnboy - 15 January 2014 26

New Scientist has an article on Australian climate policy (no, this is not an excuse for the nutters on both sides to break free, you know who you are) which contains an interesting aside about Canberra:

In an as-yet-unpublished study, Hanna and her colleagues found that older suburbs in Canberra with more trees were up to 7 °C cooler than newer, less leafy suburbs.

There are downsides to ancient three bed ex-govvies in the inner suburbs, but there are certainly some upsides!

What’s Your opinion?


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26 Responses to
Canberra’s leafy suburbs 7 degrees cooler than treeless hell?
1
Holden Caulfield 7:41 pm
15 Jan 14
#

Of couurse, every suburb in Canberra has been a treeless hell at some stage.

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2
Queen_of_the_Bun 8:02 pm
15 Jan 14
#

Holden Caulfield said :

Of couurse, every suburb in Canberra has been a treeless hell at some stage.

Really? So developers with bulldozers were at work in Red Hill and Campbell in the 1920s?

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3
Persephone 8:10 pm
15 Jan 14
#

And suddenly watering the street trees is with a few bucket a of water makes it seven times better…

http://the-riotact.com/save-the-trees-because-were-incapable-cryeth-tams/122426

Feeling seven degrees cooler here.

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4
johnboy 9:32 pm
15 Jan 14
#

Not too many trees in reid and campbell in the old photos.

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5
Queen_of_the_Bun 9:34 pm
15 Jan 14
#

johnboy said :

Not too many trees in reid and campbell in the old photos.

What about southside?

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6
johnboy 9:36 pm
15 Jan 14
#

They didn’t call it the limestone plains for the abundant trees. It was heavily grazed sheep country.

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7
Queen_of_the_Bun 9:37 pm
15 Jan 14
#

johnboy said :

Not too many trees in reid and campbell in the old photos.

What about southside? Red Hill?
Fricking inner northies drive me insane.

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8
johnboy 9:40 pm
15 Jan 14
#

I’m pretty sure the deciduous trees of red hill and forrest were not there before they started building the city.

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9
c_c™ 9:57 pm
15 Jan 14
#

johnboy said :

They didn’t call it the limestone plains for the abundant trees. It was heavily grazed sheep country.

“Red Hill itself rises to a height of rather more than 2350 feet… an abundance of trees lend a pleasant background for the residences which are to grace the foothill.”

Canberra Times, 28 Oct 1926 (page 11)

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10
Postalgeek 9:58 pm
15 Jan 14
#

Queen_of_the_Bun said :

johnboy said :

Not too many trees in reid and campbell in the old photos.

What about southside? Red Hill?
Fricking inner northies drive me insane.

Pretty easy to check that one:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/canberrahouse/2708107695/

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11
puggy 10:05 pm
15 Jan 14
#

johnboy said :

Not too many trees in reid and campbell in the old photos.

That’s what bugs me about people bagging out newer suburbs for the lack of trees. One of the upsides to the site for Canberra was considered to be the comparative lack of trees. The vast majority of greenery in the city’s inhabited areas was planted after settlement.

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12
c_c™ 11:39 pm
15 Jan 14
#

puggy said :

johnboy said :

Not too many trees in reid and campbell in the old photos.

That’s what bugs me about people bagging out newer suburbs for the lack of trees. One of the upsides to the site for Canberra was considered to be the comparative lack of trees. The vast majority of greenery in the city’s inhabited areas was planted after settlement.

Source?

That’s a very big claim, which isn’t to say it wasn’t the genuine sentiment of some perhaps back then, but certainly there were laments early on that the hills (which as distinct from the base of the plains which were naturally lacking trees, were heavily wooded) were cleared by graziers for the most part, removing some useful natural resources from both a visual and practical stand point.

One of the very early bureaucracies established for the new capital was the Parks and Gardens Branch, and some of the earliest public works involved establishing native trees.

In 1919 they kicked graziers off Mt Majura and reserved it (I suppose a very early incarnation of the Canberra Nature Park). They planted over 20,000 trees, mainly Kurrajongs over the following 2 years.

Earlier in 1917, they’d started a massive planting program to regenerate Mt Russell, 10,000 eucalyptus trees and another 5000 on 1925.

Between 1918 and 1920, they planted over 26,000 native trees at Mugga Mugga, mainly box trees.

They also planted heaps of imported species in those early years two, and lost a lot. An early planting of cedars, about 10,000 were killed by draught and had to be replanted. 100,000 redwods were planted and a lot failed and had to be replaced.

The planting programs only grew, thousands of acres every year planned, including commercial plantations.

There was also praise for the fact that much of the natural forrest, in particular Mountain Ash to the West of the ACT, was intact, though regularly damaged by fires used by NSW graziers over the border to the chagrin of ACT planners.

The lack of trees was seen as an error to be remediated, at great effort and cost. And perhaps demonstrating this importance, Canberra was restoring native tree populations before we even had reliable drinking water established from the planned catchment.

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13
HiddenDragon 11:53 pm
15 Jan 14
#

The deciduous trees were all laid out by the Druids, according to The Secret Plan, long before it was Limestone Plains – Burley Griffin just came along and set it down on paper…..

But seriously, trees certainly seem to make a difference to the actual and perceived temperature. I just think it’s unfortunate that we can’t have a more balanced approach to the use of trees in this town – on the one hand, we have at times, preservation to the point of what seems like zealotry and on the other, stark, sterile brutalist developments where any token greenery is like a sprig of parsley on a baked buffalo.

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14
wildturkeycanoe 7:07 am
16 Jan 14
#

Then come Autumn, the folks in the leafy suburbs are constantly raking the mess off their lawn and kerb, wondering what to do with the piles of leaves they aren’t allowed to burn or put in the bins. Rains come and due to the build up in the gutters the ceiling gets flooded, they can’t park their car on the nature strip or road because of sap and bird droppings and every few years the plumber has to be called in to unblock the roots from the aging sewer line. Everything has a downside, enjoy your 33 degree days.

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15
Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd 7:08 am
16 Jan 14
#

CLIMATE CHANGE IS CRAPPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!!!!

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