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CBR 100 Challenge – is it pricing many locals out of participating?

By 5 September 2014 10

Earlier this week a new fitness challenge was announced.  Celebrating the newly joined up Centenary Trail, the CBR 100 Challenge includes team participation to walk 25, 50 or 100km along with solo runs of 50 or 100km (yes, you read that right).

I thought this sounded like a really nice thing to do (the team walk, I’m not a runner unless chased by something ferocious).  Maybe take on a 50km walk challenge with a couple of friends and use it as a great focus to get fit and enjoy the Canberra fresh air and walking tracks.

Until I went to look for more details, including registration costs.

cbe-100-challenge

Note: team costs are per team, so would be spread between three participants.

All money raised will go to the Heart Foundation which is a great cause, but I can’t help but wonder if they would perhaps attract more participants across the community and promote exercise if the registration was more attainable.

Or, is this the cost these days once relevant insurances and infrastructure is put in place?

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10 Responses to CBR 100 Challenge – is it pricing many locals out of participating?
#1
thatsnotme10:36 pm, 05 Sep 14

Why on earth would anyone enter as a team?? Once you divide the team cost into three, you’re actually paying more per person than if you’d entered solo. Just enter as individuals, then walk together anyway.

I agree that those prices are ridiculous, especially for an event that anyone could go and do themselves for free any time they felt like it. I don’t think that the insurance and infrastructure costs can justify that entry fee. The Kowalski Classic, which is a 100km mountain bike race, is coming up soon. Entry is also $140, including insurance – and a 100km mountain bike race is sure to have way higher insurance costs than a 100km walk / run. The Kowalski also offers over $8,000 worth of prize money.

Don’t be confused re the fundraising aspect either. All money raised does NOT go to the Heart Foundation – all money FUNDRAISED goes to the Heart Foundation. Your entry fee is not fundraising. Presumably, the idea is that you enter, and then do additional fundraising. Apparently, when you enter you also have the option to make a one-off donation – on top of your entry fees.

Looking at the web page, I’d also thought that this must be something that was ACT Government supported or initiated, especially given the use of CBR logo. Nothing suggests it is though. The website is a .com.au hosted site, there’s no info about partnering with the ACT Government, and it looks like it’s a business promoting this event.

Reminds me a lot of the Colour Run. Something that outwardly looks like an event run for charity, but when you look closer is just a money making event for the business running it.

#2
Russ8:30 am, 06 Sep 14

When I first heard about this I also assumed it was an ACT Government thing with the revenue going to the Heart Foundation.

Now I’ve had a second look at the web site and, as mentioned, it appears to have nothing to do with the government, and it’s quite clear that only money that is specifically “fundraised” by registered fundraisers goes to the Heart Foundation.

Looking closer, it appears this is a business venture by a crowd called Earlybird Events.

Absolutely nothing wrong with that, and if the Heart Foundation ultimately benefits to some extent, all the better. I just feel like I was taken in by the way the event is presented. It sounds like a lot of others have been too.

#3
dungfungus11:29 am, 06 Sep 14

thatsnotme said :

Why on earth would anyone enter as a team?? Once you divide the team cost into three, you’re actually paying more per person than if you’d entered solo. Just enter as individuals, then walk together anyway.

I agree that those prices are ridiculous, especially for an event that anyone could go and do themselves for free any time they felt like it. I don’t think that the insurance and infrastructure costs can justify that entry fee. The Kowalski Classic, which is a 100km mountain bike race, is coming up soon. Entry is also $140, including insurance – and a 100km mountain bike race is sure to have way higher insurance costs than a 100km walk / run. The Kowalski also offers over $8,000 worth of prize money.

Don’t be confused re the fundraising aspect either. All money raised does NOT go to the Heart Foundation – all money FUNDRAISED goes to the Heart Foundation. Your entry fee is not fundraising. Presumably, the idea is that you enter, and then do additional fundraising. Apparently, when you enter you also have the option to make a one-off donation – on top of your entry fees.

Looking at the web page, I’d also thought that this must be something that was ACT Government supported or initiated, especially given the use of CBR logo. Nothing suggests it is though. The website is a .com.au hosted site, there’s no info about partnering with the ACT Government, and it looks like it’s a business promoting this event.

Reminds me a lot of the Colour Run. Something that outwardly looks like an event run for charity, but when you look closer is just a money making event for the business running it.

CBR is a registered business logo owned by the ACT Government (check ATMOSS) so it must be their initiative.
If they have stated it is for the Heart Foundation it would have to be approved by that organisation so why don’t you check with them and ask them their opinion of the high level registration fees.

#4
Masquara12:29 pm, 06 Sep 14

Transparency please!

CBR 100 challenge website has no mention that this is organised by a private PR and events company, Earlybird.

PR on the ABC referred to this event as being a fundraiser for the Heart Foundation – no mention of Earlybird. Just how much of the steep entry price will go to the Heart Foundation is anything but clear.

It’s quite plausibly worded: “moneys fundraised will go to the Heart Foundation”, but not “moneys raised”. That deliberate distinction leaves an awful lot of wriggle room for the ACT Government’s contribution of $50,000, plus the entry fees, to all go to the private company, and only the money “fundraised” by “celebrity participants” actually going to the Heart Foundation.

Unfortunately it is all too easy for plain old companies to make their events look as “community” as possible, and give the impression to entrants that they are making a charity contribution, when that isn’t exactly the case, and the event organisers can pocket most-to-all the money that comes in. By dint of weasel words and careful framing.

Earlybird Events, could you please clarify the arrangements?

#5
Masquara3:03 pm, 06 Sep 14

Indeed dungfungus, it begs the question: how much are “Earlybird Events” paying to use the CBR logo for private, for-profit purposes (albeit with the apparent little red herring of Heart Foundation fundraising).

#6
tooltime9:56 pm, 06 Sep 14

Hi All,

I too do not like the opaque nature of the financial distribution of this event. But it’s a separate issue to the actual cost of it.

No doubt, the organisers have significant public liability and other costs. But is it really that outrageous compared to other similar disciplines?

Sri Chimnoy ~ $150
Capital punishment ~ $150
City to surf $65 – $85 looks cheap, but they get nearly 100,000 punters don’t they?

My 2yo daughters water safety lessons are 30 minutes, $17. But what are you gonna do? Take up tennis, golf or equestrian? Nothing’s cheap these days….

#7
dungfungus10:24 pm, 06 Sep 14

Masquara said :

Indeed dungfungus, it begs the question: how much are “Earlybird Events” paying to use the CBR logo for private, for-profit purposes (albeit with the apparent little red herring of Heart Foundation fundraising).

Surely the ACT Government is not so cash-strapped that it has to sell of it’s IP to generate cash flow.
Then again, there is an idealistic tram project to keep funding to the “investment ready” stage (and beyond) and lots of other visionary stuff in the top drawer.
Then there are the sports sponsorships etc.

#8
John Moulis10:46 am, 07 Sep 14

Russ said :

When I first heard about this I also assumed it was an ACT Government thing with the revenue going to the Heart Foundation.

Now I’ve had a second look at the web site and, as mentioned, it appears to have nothing to do with the government, and it’s quite clear that only money that is specifically “fundraised” by registered fundraisers goes to the Heart Foundation.

Looking closer, it appears this is a business venture by a crowd called Earlybird Events.

Absolutely nothing wrong with that, and if the Heart Foundation ultimately benefits to some extent, all the better. I just feel like I was taken in by the way the event is presented. It sounds like a lot of others have been too.

The Heart Foundation has been involved in at least one other dodgy promotion. Remember the Heart Foundation red tick on foods which were supposedly healthy? They ran that ad on TV with the vending machine refusing to dispense the tick claiming that the tick couldn’t be bought, but it was reported that firms paid the Heart Foundation $20,000.00 to use the tick. McDonald’s paid the money and began putting the tick on its burgers. The Heart Foundation kept running the ad until I called them out on my blog and complained to the Advertising Standards Board.

#9
KimKing3:06 pm, 08 Sep 14

Hi everyone,

Thanks for your questions and interests in this event. Kim here from Earlybird Events, just jumping on to answer a few of your questions, if I can.

First of all, yes, the CBR 100 Challenge is a initiative of Earlybird Events. If you’re not familiar with us, we are a very small local business, and to be honest, we just loved the idea of the Centenary Trail and wanted to do something to encourage people to use it – and that, along the same lines as similar events, would provide an opportunity to raise money for charity as well. I personally completed a similar challenge in Sydney last year and thought it would be a great experience to re-create in Canberra.

We then approached the ACT Government who also thought it was a great idea, provided some financial support in exchange for becoming the naming rights sponsor. The event is well-aligned with the CBR vision and values of that brand. I can’t really speak for the ACT Government, but I’m sure if you read the Chief Minister’s comments from the launch, you’ll see their interest is in encouraging use of the Centenary Trail (especially for those not quite Confident, Bold and Ready enough to take it on alone!), as well as improving our health and continuing to attract more visitors to Canberra with a diverse and interesting calendar of events.

The Heart Foundation is also really happy to be involved, and they simply wouldn’t be if it wasn’t worth their while and in line with their purpose as well.

I think a few people have already provided price comparisons regarding the entry fees, so I don’t think I need to add much more there. I will emphasise that the CBR100 Challenge will have well-serviced checkpoints, and we’ll be providing a professional 12-week training and nutrition program for participants (developed for us by other small businesses in Canberra). Yes, there are significant infrastructure and insurance costs associated with an event like this, and more so with the CBR 100 Challenge due to the length, scale and nature of the event. We are a small business, and an event like this is a big risk for us so yes, we do need to cover our costs and pay our bills – but our focus is absolutely on running a safe and high-quality event that, hopefully, can be repeated in future if it’s a success.

We’ve been very clear in all our communications about our involvement – including our contact information on the website, as well as our media releases that were also sent to The Riot ACT. So I apologise absolutely if anyone missed this information, but certainly, we’ve sought to be very open and transparent about this all the way through.

Rest assured I’ve taken on board the feedback though, and we’re in the process of adding some more information to our website to clarify – for example – exactly what you get for that registration fee.

Thanks again for reading – happy to answer any more questions if you’d like to drop me a line at info@earlybirdevents.com.au or phone 02 6126 5900.

Kim

#10
pajs10:21 am, 09 Sep 14

KimKing said :

Hi everyone,

Thanks for your questions and interests in this event. Kim here from Earlybird Events, just jumping on to answer a few of your questions, if I can.

First of all, yes, the CBR 100 Challenge is a initiative of Earlybird Events. If you’re not familiar with us, we are a very small local business, and to be honest, we just loved the idea of the Centenary Trail and wanted to do something to encourage people to use it – and that, along the same lines as similar events, would provide an opportunity to raise money for charity as well. I personally completed a similar challenge in Sydney last year and thought it would be a great experience to re-create in Canberra.

We then approached the ACT Government who also thought it was a great idea, provided some financial support in exchange for becoming the naming rights sponsor. The event is well-aligned with the CBR vision and values of that brand. I can’t really speak for the ACT Government, but I’m sure if you read the Chief Minister’s comments from the launch, you’ll see their interest is in encouraging use of the Centenary Trail (especially for those not quite Confident, Bold and Ready enough to take it on alone!), as well as improving our health and continuing to attract more visitors to Canberra with a diverse and interesting calendar of events.

The Heart Foundation is also really happy to be involved, and they simply wouldn’t be if it wasn’t worth their while and in line with their purpose as well.

I think a few people have already provided price comparisons regarding the entry fees, so I don’t think I need to add much more there. I will emphasise that the CBR100 Challenge will have well-serviced checkpoints, and we’ll be providing a professional 12-week training and nutrition program for participants (developed for us by other small businesses in Canberra). Yes, there are significant infrastructure and insurance costs associated with an event like this, and more so with the CBR 100 Challenge due to the length, scale and nature of the event. We are a small business, and an event like this is a big risk for us so yes, we do need to cover our costs and pay our bills – but our focus is absolutely on running a safe and high-quality event that, hopefully, can be repeated in future if it’s a success.

We’ve been very clear in all our communications about our involvement – including our contact information on the website, as well as our media releases that were also sent to The Riot ACT. So I apologise absolutely if anyone missed this information, but certainly, we’ve sought to be very open and transparent about this all the way through.

Rest assured I’ve taken on board the feedback though, and we’re in the process of adding some more information to our website to clarify – for example – exactly what you get for that registration fee.

Thanks again for reading – happy to answer any more questions if you’d like to drop me a line at info@earlybirdevents.com.au or phone 02 6126 5900.

Kim

That’s a really good response, Kim.

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