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Crime on the run

By johnboy - 15 January 2014 36

ACT Policing’s latest crime statistics show crime reports across the ACT dropped 10 per cent in the last year, following a five-year downward trend with property crime leading the way.

The ACT has seen a drop of a third in crime reports over the last five years from 43,139 in 2009 to 28,976 in 2013, excluding Traffic Infringement Notices and road fatalities or collisions with injury.

Reports of crimes against property have taken the steepest dive over the last five years with reports of motor vehicle theft down 66 per cent, burglary down 57 per cent, robbery down 54 per cent and theft down 28 per cent. Reports of property damage, which include damage by fire, explosion, graffiti and/or other methods, dropped 48 per cent.

Acting Chief Police Officer for the ACT, David Pryce, is pleased to see the continued reduction in crime across the ACT, which he attributes to joint ACT Government initiatives, ACT Policing’s crime reduction strategies and the support of the ACT community.

“The continued downward trend in crime is pleasing and demonstrates that our targeted crime reduction strategies are effective. However, we cannot take these results for granted and must continue to work together as a community to prevent and fight crime,” Acting Chief Police Officer Pryce said.

The ACT Government 2012-15 Property Crime Reduction Strategy has been in place since May 2012, building on the strong results of the previous property crime reduction strategy from 2004 to 2007. The strategy focuses on crime prevention within the community and diversion of recidivist and young offenders, and strong whole-of-Government collaboration between ACT Directorates.

“The support of the community is vital to ensuring continued crime reduction can be achieved. Community based activities such as ACT Neighbourhood Watch and ACT Crime Stoppers are two excellent examples of how active involvement of the community can help make the ACT one of the safest communities in Australia,” said Acting Chief Police Officer Pryce.

The latest crime statistics also show a drop of 14 per cent in reports of crime across the ACT when comparing the October to December quarter of 2013 to the same quarter in the previous year. This was led by a 28 per cent drop in reports of crime in Weston Creek, closely followed by a 27 per cent drop in Woden and a 21 per cent drop in Tuggeranong.

Members wishing to join or know more about ACT Neighbourhood Watch should visit its website at www.nhwact.com.au

Anyone with information about a crime can make a report to Crime Stoppers, anytime, on 1800 333 000 or via its website www.act.crimestoppers.com.au.

People contacting Crime Stoppers can choose to remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward payment of up to $1,000.

The latest interactive CrimeStatistics can be found at police.act.gov.au.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

What’s Your opinion?


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36 Responses to
Crime on the run
1
IrishPete 1:48 pm
15 Jan 14
#

That’s great.

The most recent ABS Crime Victimisation Survey http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4530.02011-12?OpenDocument concurs, with significant reductions in break and enter and malicious damage in recent years (it only goes up to 2011-12 but a new report should be released soon.

However, it does suggest that break-ins have been partly replaced with attempted break-ins (or that some malicious damage is now being reported in the survey as attempted break-in). As there have been significant (in both senses of the word) reductions in the reporting of attempted break-ins, that could help explain a surprisingly dramatic reduction in reported crime.

This crime survey doesn’t measure the amount of crime well, but can measure trends in crime and in reporting of it – it only reports where people have been a victim at least once (it doesn’t easily give a full count of the number of incidents) and also doesn’t formally include businesses and government. And obviously excludes a whole range of crimes that police include in their stats.

IP

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2
JonnieWalker 11:47 am
16 Jan 14
#

It shows some promise. The assault rate is what is killing us though. ACT has the highest assult rate a in Australia after NT (on a state by state basis) – and although I’m sure Potts Point in Sydney has a high rate Canberra has a higher rate of assult than Sydney.

Of course Canberra, and Australia more widely has a higher assult rate (per capita) than NYC which is about a third of ours (not accounting for gun crime or murders). Let me know if anyone needs references.

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3
JonnieWalker 11:48 am
16 Jan 14
#

Forgot to mention – a majority of these assults happen in or around licensed premises.

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4
JonnieWalker 11:49 am
16 Jan 14
#

JonnieWalker said :

Forgot to mention – a majority of these assults happen in or around licensed premises.

Not to take away from the good work white ribbon does against domestic violence – which for the most part probably doesnt get reported unfortunatly.

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5
JonnieWalker 11:58 am
16 Jan 14
#

I’d bet my house that if you close down pubs and clubs at midnight you would see a decrease in both property crime and assults

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6
maxblues 2:12 pm
16 Jan 14
#

JonnieWalker said :

I’d bet my house that if you close down pubs and clubs at midnight you would see a decrease in both property crime and assults

Is it fully landscaped and conveniently located near a pub or club?

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7
slashdot 2:24 pm
16 Jan 14
#

JonnieWalker said :

I’d bet my house that if you close down pubs and clubs at midnight you would see a decrease in both property crime and assults

And I bet that if the judiciary did their f**king job we wouldn’t have such a high rate either

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8
A_Cog 2:27 pm
16 Jan 14
#

What a load of rubbish.

“The ACT has seen a drop of a third in crime reports over the last five years from 43,139 in 2009 to 28,976 in 2013, excluding Traffic Infringement Notices and road fatalities or collisions with injury.”
– changing which suburbs were included in the old Patrol Zones (remember them?), getting rid of Patrol Zones altogether, and changing stat categories helped twist these stats. 2012 crime numbers in my suburb were well over double my 2008 and 2009 numbers. The 2013 quarterly numbers released by ACT Policing frequently departed (were different, for some strange reason) from other sources.

“The continued downward trend in crime is pleasing and demonstrates that our targeted crime reduction strategies are effective…”
– or maybe, it’s the result of all the good work of Justice Nield, the NSW-import who thinks jails are for jailing.

“The latest crime statistics also show a drop of 14 per cent in reports of crime across the ACT when comparing the October to December quarter of 2013 to the same quarter in the previous year.”
– that’s because 2012 was a TRULY SHOCKING year. In some suburbs, 2012 numbers were nearly TRIPLE the numbers for 2008 or 2009, and my 2013 results for car theft broke the record. But hey, ACT Policing don’t provide the 2008 stats anymore, so unless you’ve been logging the results for years, you can’t see how bad things got in 2011 and 2012.

“Members wishing to join or know more about ACT Neighbourhood Watch should visit its website…”
– is this because ACT Policing ain’t gonna be much help with their SHOCKINGLY LOW CLEARANCES? And because the crims they do catch get let off by rubbish judges, or get let out of AMC asap under minimum non-parole periods because the AMC is over-crowded.

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9
HiddenDragon 2:38 pm
16 Jan 14
#

Re JonnieWalker’s comments at #2 to #5 (which I am a little surprised by, but don’t need references to accept) is there a view as to why our assault rate is so relatively high? Could much, if any, of the difference between the ACT and other jurisdictions be attributed to a greater propensity here to report and record assaults?

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10
gazket 3:14 pm
16 Jan 14
#

Teenagers don’t bother robbing houses any more, it’s too much work. They just walk down the street pull out a knife and get a smart phone and wallet with instant cash.

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11
JonnieWalker 4:23 pm
16 Jan 14
#

HiddenDragon said :

Re JonnieWalker’s comments at #2 to #5 (which I am a little surprised by, but don’t need references to accept) is there a view as to why our assault rate is so relatively high? Could much, if any, of the difference between the ACT and other jurisdictions be attributed to a greater propensity here to report and record assaults?

It is really difficult to find stats comparing apples with apples (you sometimes need to get different stats from different reports from different years), and there are other complications for example ACT is primarily metro, and difficult to compare with NSW and this can’t be extrapolated to Sydney, but my view is as follows:
Taking NT out of the picture when we compare ACT we are talking about very small but all metro with less distinction within that metro area than Sydney. Comparisons are difficult on both a state and city level, and there is not a lot of faith in using police stats by themselves (plenty of articles on this) but i think using Canberra demographics to show a general trend towards assaults in new demographics will skew the numbers a bit. eg assault rates in women demographics and social class demographics increasing. – If you took the same demographics from Sydney you might get a similar response although policing and court approaches are a little different between states.

Research shows that longer custodial sentences dont work as a deterrent. The biggest factor in deterrence is (based on correlations) 1) the chance of the offender getting cought and 2) the chance of a custodial sentence (regardless of the length of the sentence).

NYC has had a really low rate compared to their high rate of the 80s due to better community policing, mandatory sentencing and various other initiaties – although there is a lot of arguement on why NYC rates have been brought down from the hights of the 80s.

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12
JonnieWalker 4:26 pm
16 Jan 14
#

A_Cog said :

What a load of rubbish.

“The ACT has seen a drop of a third in crime reports over the last five years from 43,139 in 2009 to 28,976 in 2013, excluding Traffic Infringement Notices and road fatalities or collisions with injury.”
– changing which suburbs were included in the old Patrol Zones (remember them?), getting rid of Patrol Zones altogether, and changing stat categories helped twist these stats. 2012 crime numbers in my suburb were well over double my 2008 and 2009 numbers. The 2013 quarterly numbers released by ACT Policing frequently departed (were different, for some strange reason) from other sources.

“The continued downward trend in crime is pleasing and demonstrates that our targeted crime reduction strategies are effective…”
– or maybe, it’s the result of all the good work of Justice Nield, the NSW-import who thinks jails are for jailing.

“The latest crime statistics also show a drop of 14 per cent in reports of crime across the ACT when comparing the October to December quarter of 2013 to the same quarter in the previous year.”
– that’s because 2012 was a TRULY SHOCKING year. In some suburbs, 2012 numbers were nearly TRIPLE the numbers for 2008 or 2009, and my 2013 results for car theft broke the record. But hey, ACT Policing don’t provide the 2008 stats anymore, so unless you’ve been logging the results for years, you can’t see how bad things got in 2011 and 2012.

“Members wishing to join or know more about ACT Neighbourhood Watch should visit its website…”
– is this because ACT Policing ain’t gonna be much help with their SHOCKINGLY LOW CLEARANCES? And because the crims they do catch get let off by rubbish judges, or get let out of AMC asap under minimum non-parole periods because the AMC is over-crowded.

A lot of problems using police stats – ask a copper what they think of crime stats and how realistic they are.

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13
JonnieWalker 4:31 pm
16 Jan 14
#

HiddenDragon said :

Re JonnieWalker’s comments at #2 to #5 (which I am a little surprised by, but don’t need references to accept) is there a view as to why our assault rate is so relatively high? Could much, if any, of the difference between the ACT and other jurisdictions be attributed to a greater propensity here to report and record assaults?

Also – many people dont see assaults if you a) dont hang out in civic on friday nights and b) arnt responding to domestics (many of which also happen after boozy nights)

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14
maxblues 4:43 pm
16 Jan 14
#

gazket said :

Teenagers don’t bother robbing houses any more, it’s too much work. They just walk down the street pull out a knife and get a smart phone and wallet with instant cash.

Yes, that happened near a church in Holt recently. Johnnie Walker Blue will have us closing down churches soon, and it must be petrol-sniffing that causes service station robberies!

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15
JonnieWalker 5:01 pm
16 Jan 14
#

maxblues said :

gazket said :

Teenagers don’t bother robbing houses any more, it’s too much work. They just walk down the street pull out a knife and get a smart phone and wallet with instant cash.

Johnnie Walker Blue will have us closing down churches soon!

+1 to that!!

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