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Double Disadvantage

By 14 March 2009 78

I see lots of Gubby agencies advertise jobs,,and state they employ a diversity of people….(including race, age and disabled) BUT when did you last come upfront with a disabled person????????

The Gubby offers extra money ect apparently for businesses to hire disabled people,,but where is that??

If you ring the Tax office you get some  person (asian) who has no idea,,,but they are approved to answer phones……why not a disabled Aussie??? who has some idea????

There is a disabled person here who has done many courses and even been to ANU and ran for Gubby……she is ignored because she is in a wheel chair,,,,WHY?? When her brain functions better than most!!!!

The time for disabled is coming,,,,,get ready for it…

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78 Responses to Double Disadvantage
#1
Pommy bastard3:39 pm, 14 Mar 09

I’ve no problem with people hiring people with disabilities, I’ve done it myself on more than one occasion.

However I hope they refrain from hiring people with, “multiple punctuation syndrome”…,,,,!!!!!?????

#2
planeguy3:57 pm, 14 Mar 09

So just because your friend can’t get a job (whereas a lady with an Asian accent, who needs to be a citizen or permanent resident to be employed in the APS) you think that the Government departments ignore people because they are in wheelchairs?

I will admit that I don’t work with anyone in a wheelchair, nor have I. However, I work with blind people (both totally, and legally blind), deaf people, intellectually disabled people, mobility challenged people and more. Everyone one of them (bar one, who was given the job because she was friends with the boss) won their position based on merit, and is performing to a similar standard as there peers.

Oh, I should say, that these people have jobs ranging from mail delivery, through to engineers, Project Managers, Senior Executives etc..

And before anyone makes a smart arse comment about “no wonder the public service is buggered, they are all disabled”, the contractors that I work with have a similar number of disabled people, filling similar sort of roles, and we are on schedule, under budget, and fully meeting requirements.

So, if the “The time for disabled is coming,,,,,get ready for it…The time for disabled is coming,,,,,get ready for it…, then I say, why isn’t it here already.

#3
Granny4:10 pm, 14 Mar 09

It’s not here yet. It’s more common for a person with a disability not to be able to find work after leaving school than the reverse.

It certainly should be here. I agree that the time for people with a disability is coming. I believe we can close the gap. I certainly thank all the MLAs that are working so hard to achieve this, particularly the Greens who have been spectacular.

#4
bloodnut5:03 pm, 14 Mar 09

yeah. they should get rid of those asians with no idea.

5 star post disabled bigot lady.

#5
el5:19 pm, 14 Mar 09

el said :

BUT when did you last come upfront with a disabled person????????

If I understand the question you were trying to ask – Yesterday, in fact.

Suggest you yourself might have trouble finding work given,,,, your!!!! writing style…….,,,!!!

#6
ant5:36 pm, 14 Mar 09

When they got rid of the CES in 98, what also went was the APS Recruitment office that ran the APS tests. Another of their roles was placing people with disabilities, and Aboriginals, into permanent positions in teh APS. When that went, teh numbers of both groups in the APS diminished. With no one actively pushing the concept, and making it easy for departments to get these people, it’s no surprise that this happened.

#7
Genie6:12 pm, 14 Mar 09

I was beginning to think the Government was lying when they claimed they would hire anyone in the public service irregardless of any disability – as long as they were suitable for the job. After getting turned down for job after job and being told it was because of an existing back injury – I was amazed at how many intellectually disabled people and mobility challenged people work for Defence. I have no idea what they do – but yay for them.

#8
Woody Mann-Caruso6:19 pm, 14 Mar 09

The number and percentage of APS employees with a disability has been steadily declining for a long time now. The 2007-08 State of the Service report shows that in 1994 there were almost 8,000 people with a disability in the APS, or about 5.6% of the APS. In 2008 there were just over 4,500, or 3.1%.

I suspect the general upskilling of the APS as a whole has eliminated many of the positions suitable for people with an intellectual disability, and this may account for much of the drop. There were around 5,300 engagements at the APS1 and 2 levels in 1995; in 2008 there were just 1,500.

The idea that somebody would be precluded from an APS position for which they are otherwise qualified because they’re in a wheelchair is morally and professionally repugnant.

#9
tastyjam6:48 pm, 14 Mar 09

I work in the IT support sector, for the Medicare Australia Central Office in Tuggeranong. They employ about 10 – 20 disabled people and are always looking to interview more.

#10
Granny6:55 pm, 14 Mar 09

That is fantastic, tastyjam! You might be interested in this young man.

#11
grunge_hippy7:22 pm, 14 Mar 09

ok, i figured out what gubby was…

#12
astrojax10:00 am, 15 Mar 09

‘irregardless’, genie?? you really have been in gubby too long! ; )

[and yup, hippy, was kinda wondering what the slant was by using 'gubby', which also took me a moment to translate...]

#13
tastyjam11:05 am, 15 Mar 09

Granny said :

You might be interested in this young man.

Very interesting Granny… i’ll try get that some Medicare attention.

#14
deceit11:58 am, 15 Mar 09

Whats ‘some asian’ person got to do with it? Why bother pointing out the race of the person, like that matters? How many Australian people answer phones these days without an idea? You narrow minded bigot.

I’m surprised you have a job with an attitude like that and a lexicon with the likes of ‘Gubby’ in it.

If anything the disabled person should be taking your job and back to the cave with you.

#15
JoyceStanton12:02 pm, 15 Mar 09

If only she had been a really attractive person in a wheelchair,she might have ‘stood’ a better chance. Whoops! Might have stumbled upon another controversial topic…..

#16
staria12:21 pm, 15 Mar 09

I agree that we need programs in place to help people to get a foot in the door as talent comes in all manner of packages (for want of a bad analogy) and many people, of different backgrounds/cultures/(dis)abilities, just aren’t good at promoting themselves or are not able to. Have been on the receiving end of people who obviously interview well, but wouldn’t know how to get the job done if an instruction manual fell out of the sky and hit them on the head. Well, actually maybe they would then, as I find poor performance is usually due to lack of initiative. But I digress…

Having said that, I found the original post despicable in its racist attitude. Since when is it ok to promote one group while in the same breath denigrating another. Shame on you!

#17
trevar1:21 pm, 15 Mar 09

trevar said :

BUT when did you last come upfront with a disabled person????????

How could you be certain when you encounter someone whether they’re disabled or not? They don’t all have wheelchairs or seeing eye dogs!

#18
vg1:47 pm, 15 Mar 09

“If you ring the Tax office you get some person (asian) who has no idea”

Nice racial stereotype you twat

#19
Granny2:20 pm, 15 Mar 09

tastyjam said :

Granny said :

You might be interested in this young man.

Very interesting Granny… i’ll try get that some Medicare attention.

Thank you so much, tastyjam.

I’ve met his mother personally and heard first-hand what a struggle she is having to help her son find employment. I feel kind of choked up just thinking about it.

It’s hard to find more loyal employees than those for whom a job is a dream come true.

: )

#20
gomer3:07 pm, 15 Mar 09

Most of us start at the bottom, which usually means packing shelves, laying bricks or another simple physical job. Unfortunately if you can’t do these things it’s going to be alot harder to get your foot in the door. The main thing to think about when you are starting out is “What CAN I do that eventually leads to what I WANT to do”.

#21
gomer3:11 pm, 15 Mar 09

I forgot to mention “Don’t get jealous”, it’s very destructive.

#22
SadMushroom4:32 pm, 15 Mar 09

OK,
Let me do this bit by bit.
First, thanks to all responses as it is helping me understand and also I was looking for more places/companies etc that did/do hire disabled people. (For a TAFE project)

Second, when I first came into RA it took me a while to catch on to all the ‘nicknames’, ummm, ‘comic names’ that were used here but I tend to stick with what I usually use/know so if you don’t understand what I am saying,,,,ummm,,,,I am sure you will get used to it.

Oh, I am not racist or against Asians having a job, just when this particular woman could NOT do the job it was annoying and I don’t see why they had her there.
(I had to contact ATO about submitting my GST statement and the number they gave me was answered by this women that I could NOT understand and she had no idea what I was talking about. She tried to transfer me and disconnected me, then after waiting another 40 minutes inline she answered again. She again tried to transfer me and again I was disconnected. I tried doing it online but didn’t have the right access, so waited and tried a few times through the week only to be answered by the same lady who admitted she had no idea. I also rang other numbers for ATO and each time they transferred me,,guess who answered again? Within a few weeks I received a letter from ATO about my ‘failure’ to contact them. They had a number that I rang and guess who answered?)
I am not saying she shouldn’t have the job because she was Asian (sounding), I am saying she shouldn’t have the job because she couldn’t do it.

Let me go answer some of the replies

#23
SadMushroom4:55 pm, 15 Mar 09

planeguy @ #2,
Really great for where you work…Good on you all.

The reason it is not here yet is because not all places or areas have the same attitude.
When the stats are taken about ‘How many people with disabilities are UNemployed” they do NOT include people who have worked within the 12 weeks before the stats or people who are employed for an hour or more a week.(even in voluntary work)

IF you, me or anyone else had a job for 1 hour a week, would you class it as gainfully employed?
The stats are there to make it all look good on the grand scale.

Oh, and it’s not just my friend, this is a whole class full of people. Who attend TAFE, CIT and even UNI, some for years on end gaining all credits and certs and cannot even get a foot in the door by the Government who recommends they do these courses to help them get a job. (by the way the Asian lady from ATO was the one who admitted she had no idea and could not even transfer me, so no it’s not because my friend cannot get a job)

Have you seen the AWARDS for businesses who hire disabled people? Not many of them listed each year, so usually the same ones listed and winning all the time.

#24
vg5:10 pm, 15 Mar 09

“Oh, I am not racist or against Asians having a job, just when this particular woman could NOT do the job it was annoying and I don’t see why they had her there.”

So the fact the person was Asian is relevant how? It clearly isn’t so why mention it? If they were Anglo Saxon and incompetent would you mention their race?

#25
deceit5:10 pm, 15 Mar 09

SadMushroom said :

OK,
Let me do this bit by bit.
First, thanks to all responses as it is helping me understand and also I was looking for more places/companies etc that did/do hire disabled people. (For a TAFE project)

Second, when I first came into RA it took me a while to catch on to all the ‘nicknames’, ummm, ‘comic names’ that were used here but I tend to stick with what I usually use/know so if you don’t understand what I am saying,,,,ummm,,,,I am sure you will get used to it.

Oh, I am not racist or against Asians having a job, just when this particular woman could NOT do the job it was annoying and I don’t see why they had her there.
(I had to contact ATO about submitting my GST statement and the number they gave me was answered by this women that I could NOT understand and she had no idea what I was talking about. She tried to transfer me and disconnected me, then after waiting another 40 minutes inline she answered again. She again tried to transfer me and again I was disconnected. I tried doing it online but didn’t have the right access, so waited and tried a few times through the week only to be answered by the same lady who admitted she had no idea. I also rang other numbers for ATO and each time they transferred me,,guess who answered again? Within a few weeks I received a letter from ATO about my ‘failure’ to contact them. They had a number that I rang and guess who answered?)
I am not saying she shouldn’t have the job because she was Asian (sounding), I am saying she shouldn’t have the job because she couldn’t do it.

Let me go answer some of the replies

I still dont see the relevance of pointing out she is asian. Do you point out a disadvantage person because they arent as able bodied as you?

Your justification is so week, maybe you should take a page out of some racial etiquette guidelines before you post such tripe in the future.

You are clearly still missing the point.

#26
BerraBoy685:16 pm, 15 Mar 09

Granny said :

It’s not here yet. It’s more common for a person with a disability not to be able to find work after leaving school than the reverse.

It certainly should be here. I agree that the time for people with a disability is coming. I believe we can close the gap. I certainly thank all the MLAs that are working so hard to achieve this, particularly the Greens who have been spectacular.

Agreed Granny. I really like Meredith Hunter and Amanda Bresnan’s style. Steve Doszpot is also doing some great work for the disabled in the ACT. Unfortunately for Steve, he seems to like helping people quietly and without sending press releases to the media announcing every efort he makes in this area (so I’m more than happy to give him much kudo’s here).

On topic, the type of injuries a person has might limit their opportunities – I have a friend in a wheelchair who has had to quit a full time position he was offered due to his condition. While I won’t go into the injuries that put him into the chair, he does have to spend a large amount of the day lying down to alleviate sores he gets in the chair and also his other injuries. This makes it difficult for him to keep a full time job.

I’ll make a point, however, of raising the employment of disabled persons by our company as an issue with our CEO next time I’m speaking with him. That said, we’d need to avoid tokenism as I don’t believe this does the self-esteem of the individuals concerned any good either.

#27
Granny5:23 pm, 15 Mar 09

That’s true, BerraBoy, but what Sally Richards has done with JACKmail shows the sort of thing that can be done when people are willing to look at how even a person with big challenges can make a meaningful contribution to society.

#28
SadMushroom5:35 pm, 15 Mar 09

OK,
for those that understood somewhat.

Granny, you have seen how hard it is for your friends son. Now thinking about what you already know about how hard it is. (The reason this OP was called Double Disadvantage is because it is twice as hard for women with a disability as it is for men)

Upto 50% of men with a disability are more likely to be employed compared to 30% of women (at some point in their lives).
********

ant, you are correct. While that money stayed with CES, the CES was making headway.
Now that money is given to “jobsearch networks” who continually place disabled on new training programs. Keeps them busy and the ‘network’ pockets the money.

Next week a bunch of 30+ year old disabled women learn how to do hair and make-up (again) and learn some nice massage therapy (to help them with the stress of NOT being able to get anywhere)

********

Genie, some areas do employ alot of people with certain disabilities. That is wonderful.

What I am trying to say (although nothing gets attention like picking at bones) is that ‘equal opportunity’ as the Government stated is not happening and the Government should be the first one to step in and put their hands up.

Not just one area but the whole lot.
Awareness of what is going on is the key.
The stats put out from Government about Government are all to cover Government butt.

#29
SadMushroom5:53 pm, 15 Mar 09

BerraBoy68 said :

Granny said :

It’s not here yet. It’s more common for a person with a disability not to be able to find work after leaving school than the reverse.

It certainly should be here. I agree that the time for people with a disability is coming. I believe we can close the gap. I certainly thank all the MLAs that are working so hard to achieve this, particularly the Greens who have been spectacular.

Agreed Granny. I really like Meredith Hunter and Amanda Bresnan’s style. Steve Doszpot is also doing some great work for the disabled in the ACT. Unfortunately for Steve, he seems to like helping people quietly and without sending press releases to the media announcing every efort he makes in this area (so I’m more than happy to give him much kudo’s here).

On topic, the type of injuries a person has might limit their opportunities – I have a friend in a wheelchair who has had to quit a full time position he was offered due to his condition. While I won’t go into the injuries that put him into the chair, he does have to spend a large amount of the day lying down to alleviate sores he gets in the chair and also his other injuries. This makes it difficult for him to keep a full time job.

I’ll make a point, however, of raising the employment of disabled persons by our company as an issue with our CEO next time I’m speaking with him. That said, we’d need to avoid tokenism as I don’t believe this does the self-esteem of the individuals concerned any good either.

Sorry Berra, I don’t know how to remove old quotes from your quote that I wanted to quote.
My orginial post may have come off weird (will explain that soon)
The OP wasn’t/isn’t about tokenism. It is the beginnings for a project about “Awareness” which started it’s beginnings in a TAFE class for Women with Disabilities.
This isn’t about feeling sorry for, or KMA stuff, this is about awareness.

I thought I would open it here as there is soo much about dogs, and speed cameras, the jet and all that other stuff that really isn’t “life affecting” but so little about what is actually happening to a large percent of people in the area.

#30
Granny6:03 pm, 15 Mar 09

I think it is extremely important to highlight these issues. People don’t know unless we tell them; but when they do learn of an injustice the response is often profoundly overwhelming.

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