Fire ban and associated closures to roll on with Severe fire danger rating

By 16 January, 2014 7

ACT Emergency Services Agency Commissioner Dominic Lane has declared a Total Fire Ban for the whole of the ACT under Section 114 of the Emergencies Act 2004 from:

12:00am Friday 17 January, 2014 to 11:59pm Friday 17 January, 2014.

The Bureau of Meteorology is forecasting hot conditions tomorrow with a predicted temperature of 41 degrees.

The Forecast Fire Danger Rating (FDR) for tomorrow is predicted to be SEVERE.

If a fire starts at the forecast fire danger level of SEVERE it may be uncontrollable and move quickly. Flames may be higher than roof tops.

Expect embers to be blown around. Spot fires may occur up to 4 km ahead of the main fire.

There is a chance people in the path of a fire may be injured or die. Some homes and businesses may be destroyed.

Leaving early is the safest option for your survival.

Well prepared and actively defended houses can offer safety during a fire.

The ESA advises you to make sure you know where you will get more information and monitor the situation for any changes. You can do this through local ACT media outlets, the ESA website www.esa.act.gov.au ,the ESA Twitter and Facebook accounts or by calling Canberra Connect on 13 22 81.

For details on nature reserves and road closures as a result of the total fire ban in the ACT visit www.tams.act.gov.au.

If a fire starts during the Total Fire Ban declaration period, the ESA advises you monitor the situation for any changes through local ACT media outlets, the ACT Emergency Services Agency website www.esa.act.gov.au or by calling Canberra Connect on 13 22 81.

To find out more about Total Fire Bans log on to the ACT Emergency Services Agency website www.esa.act.gov.au or call Canberra Connect on 13 22 81.

4:18 PM

[Courtesy ESA]

Please login to post your comments
7 Responses to Fire ban and associated closures to roll on with Severe fire danger rating
#1
Jivrashia9:26 am, 17 Jan 14

If a fire starts during the Total Fire Ban declaration period, the ESA advises you monitor the situation for any changes through local ACT media outlets,

Not really wishing to contradict authorities but…

If I saw a fire start the last thing I would do is to go for my smartphone.
I’d first assess the situation and, if no immediate danger seems present, then try to put it out with whatever means are at my disposal, including relieving myself over it.

#2
Ghettosmurf879:47 am, 17 Jan 14

Jivrashia said :

If a fire starts during the Total Fire Ban declaration period, the ESA advises you monitor the situation for any changes through local ACT media outlets,

Not really wishing to contradict authorities but…

If I saw a fire start the last thing I would do is to go for my smartphone.
I’d first assess the situation and, if no immediate danger seems present, then try to put it out with whatever means are at my disposal, including relieving myself over it.

Except that you’ve added in *saw*, which was not contained in the original post by the authorities.

The way I read it was that if there was a known fire in the ACT, residents should monitor the changes in that fire through local ACT media outlets.

I.e, person hears there is a fire somewhere out their side of town, they keep track of what’s happening through the radio/tele/twitter.

When you add in *saw* or *see* a fire starting, then your advice is very good.

#3
BimboGeek9:51 am, 17 Jan 14

LOL I think they meant if a big fire starts somewhere in the ACT although I agree we can all do our bit by putting out any tiny fire we might see and maybe after that or while waiting for the watering can to fill up we can alert the firies that it’s happened.

If I hear anyone yell “fire” I’ll leave the baby with a neighbour and come running with a bucket. :-)

#4
Jivrashia11:17 am, 17 Jan 14

Ghettosmurf87 said :

Except that you’ve added in *saw*, which was not contained in the original post by the authorities.

Got a bit confusing because two paragraphs pretty much said the same thing.
monitor the situation for any changes
check local ACT media outlets (web site, twitter, facebook, phone no.)

Whichever way, my man hose is loaded after a pit-stop at the pub I’m ready.

#5
Ghettosmurf8711:27 am, 17 Jan 14

Jivrashia said :

Ghettosmurf87 said :

Except that you’ve added in *saw*, which was not contained in the original post by the authorities.

Got a bit confusing because two paragraphs pretty much said the same thing.
monitor the situation for any changes
check local ACT media outlets (web site, twitter, facebook, phone no.)

Whichever way, my man hose is loaded after a pit-stop at the pub I’m ready.

Haha, funny sh!t

#6
Nylex_Clock12:35 pm, 17 Jan 14

Has the doofus in ACT government hilariously had the electric BBQs at the Cotter disabled again, during the fire ban?

#7
wildturkeycanoe2:26 pm, 17 Jan 14

Nylex_Clock said :

Has the doofus in ACT government hilariously had the electric BBQs at the Cotter disabled again, during the fire ban?

Probably for the safety of the public as fat fires can start. Still, makes you wonder about pilot flames in gas hot water services all around Canberra. Imagine if the yard hadn’t been maintained and the drying grass wilts toward the hot water system, slowly approaching the flame. Apparently driving a car through tall dry grass can also ignite a fire when the engine components [exhaust] come into contact with the dry grass. That is one I used to dread when off-roading in summer. I wonder if they’ll close the national parks to the public, in case of this happening. Oh, I see they already have according to the TAMS website .It does say that the electric BBQs are available though.

Advertisement
GET PREMIUM MEMBERSHIP
Advertisement

Halloween in Australia?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

IMAGES OF CANBERRA

Advertisement
Sponsors
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.