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Gallery declares Renaissance victory!

By johnboy - 12 April 2012 21

virginia the roman

The National Gallery seems to be very happy with the attendances recorded for their Renaissance exhibition:

Director of the National Gallery of Australia, Ron Radford AM said today, “The Renaissance exhibition attracted 212,920 visitors from all across Australia injecting an estimated $75 million into the ACT economy.”

“This makes Renaissance the second most popular exhibition staged at the National Gallery of Australia in the last ten years. We are delighted that so many Australians took the opportunity to see this magnificent collection of Renaissance art and we are very grateful to the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo for lending us their precious works.”

The national marketing campaign made possible through the support of the ACT Government through ACT Tourism and the Gallery’s media sponsors ensured a high profile for the exhibition around Australia, with 81% of visitors to the exhibition coming from outside the ACT. Almost 20% of interstate visitors came from Melbourne and Victoria which represents the highest visitation from this state at a National Gallery of Australia major exhibition.

The introduction of timed ticketing by the National Gallery of Australia allowed visitors to choose a time and day to see the exhibition ensuring that 97% of visitors rated their experience as highly satisfactory.

The painting, Portrait of a Child of the Redetti Household by Giovan Battista Moroni was voted the clear favourite by visitors to the exhibition.

[Image: Sandro Botticelli
The story of Virginia the Roman c.1500
tempera and gold on wood panel
83.3 x 165.5 cm
Accademia Carrara, Bergamo, bequest of Giovanni Morelli 1891]

What’s Your opinion?


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21 Responses to
Gallery declares Renaissance victory!
1
Jivrashia 10:23 am
12 Apr 12
#

I personally thought Raphael’s St. Sebastian was the highlight of the exhibition.

Also had a bit of a chuckle when I saw an painting of Jesus’ crucifiction with a character that isn’t described in the bible. Turned out that it was the sponsor, a noble wealthy man, who funded the painting and asked the painter to include him in, kneeling at the foot of Jesus’ cross.

The ideal of doctoring was prevalent even during these times…

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2
johnboy 10:24 am
12 Apr 12
#

the influence of power on media writ large upon canvas for the ages.

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3
BuzzwordBingo 10:33 am
12 Apr 12
#

And I never realised that the cucumber (the cucumber!) and the quince were potent symbols of the resurrection … learned two things that day!

Thanks RA for the tickets too btw :-)

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4
Ben_Dover 10:34 am
12 Apr 12
#

I saw it, I was a bit underwhelmed. Though this may have been due to me seeing the wonderful “Handwritten” exhibition before it on the same day.

http://www.nla.gov.au/exhibitions/handwritten

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5
poetix 11:35 am
12 Apr 12
#

The Man of Sorrows by Lorenzo Monaco and of course Christ the Redeemer by Botticelli were my two favourites. And the gift-shop had Christ the Rigatoni.

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6
JazzyJess 11:59 am
12 Apr 12
#

Jivrashia said :

I personally thought Raphael’s St. Sebastian was the highlight of the exhibition.

Also had a bit of a chuckle when I saw an painting of Jesus’ crucifiction with a character that isn’t described in the bible. Turned out that it was the sponsor, a noble wealthy man, who funded the painting and asked the painter to include him in, kneeling at the foot of Jesus’ cross.

The ideal of doctoring was prevalent even during these times…

There were a couple of paintings like that – wealthy patron superimposed into a situation they have no business being depicted in. Gave me and mum a good laugh.

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7
c_c 1:48 pm
12 Apr 12
#

So would the keyboard warriors on here who months ago attacked the ACT Government’s funding contribution to the exhibition care to retract their criticisms? I recall pointing out the return on investment would more than justify the $500,000 spent as I recall. Looks like $72m reasons to prove it.

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8
Snarky 2:23 pm
12 Apr 12
#

I don’t know if this is par for the course at such exhibitions, but while I thought the paintings were great and hugely enjoyed going through them all, the accompanying guide book(let) was sparse to the point of virtually useless. No context, no showing the development of themes or techniques over the time, little about the paintings themselves.

I’m not an art student or anything, and I don’t know just how much is actually known about each painting, but by the time I hit the end I was already dreaming up a killer iphone app that would give a genuinely complete guide to the period and pieces – you could do it with info from wikipedia alone I reckon. Add in more from more specialist sites and you’d have a real and satisfying educational experience. I’d be happy to pay for THAT!

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9
dungfungus 10:17 pm
12 Apr 12
#

c_c said :

So would the keyboard warriors on here who months ago attacked the ACT Government’s funding contribution to the exhibition care to retract their criticisms? I recall pointing out the return on investment would more than justify the $500,000 spent as I recall. Looks like $72m reasons to prove it.

I heard Ron Radford on ABC 666 this morning. He was asked about the economics of staging the exhibition from an NGA perspective and he refused to give any details; perhaps the NGA made a lot of money in which case they can repay the $500K “investment” (plus interest) to ACT ratepayers.
He then “estimates” that the exhibition brought in $75 million into the ACT economy from 172,465 Australian visitors outside the ACT which is $434.87 per person. I find this difficult to believe and I would suggest that the exhibition was not up to the NGA’s expectations – we will never know will we?
I haven’t heard anyone from the business sector backing his $75 million estimate either and yes, I suppose any money it generated is a good thing but no, the $500K invested on behalf of the ACT ratepayers was not a good deal. Before you ask if I even went to the exhibition I will confirm that I didn’t – I had an oppotunity to see it in Italy once to see but these religio-centric depictions don’t appeal to me as “art”. This is not a criticism as I respect the appeal they would have to most Catholics but then again a lot of my Catholic colleagues didn’t go to the exhibition either.
Accordingly, I do not retract my previous criticisms.

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10
c_c 11:09 pm
12 Apr 12
#

Let’s consider some rough figures, mainly to illustrate scale.

20% of exhibition visitors came from Melbourne – 42 584.

If they all flew into Canberra Airport, then the ACT economy makes $11 each before they even leave the plane. That’s over $468,000 and they’re not on the aerobridge yet.

If they all stay just one night in a Canberra motel, let’s say using the Crowne Plaza’s special package for the exhibition at $280 a night for 2 people with 2 tickets. You could easily be looking at over $6million into the ACT economy from that.

Meals, another couple of million easy. Hell we’re talking Melbourne folk, if each buys a coffee that’s $170,000+ into the economy.

$75m might be a stretch, but there’s still many millions of dollars now in the ACT economy to justify ACT Government support. Asking the Gallery to repay it is daft. I would be amazed if they made much of a profit, and they certainly weren’t the greatest beneficiary of the tourism dollars.

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11
Jethro 7:08 am
13 Apr 12
#

Fantastic exhibition made even more fantastic by the fact Riot-Act gave me my tickets!

Thanks guys!

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12
Jethro 7:11 am
13 Apr 12
#

dungfungus said :

c_c said :

So would the keyboard warriors on here who months ago attacked the ACT Government’s funding contribution to the exhibition care to retract their criticisms? I recall pointing out the return on investment would more than justify the $500,000 spent as I recall. Looks like $72m reasons to prove it.

I heard Ron Radford on ABC 666 this morning. He was asked about the economics of staging the exhibition from an NGA perspective and he refused to give any details; perhaps the NGA made a lot of money in which case they can repay the $500K “investment” (plus interest) to ACT ratepayers.
He then “estimates” that the exhibition brought in $75 million into the ACT economy from 172,465 Australian visitors outside the ACT which is $434.87 per person. I find this difficult to believe and I would suggest that the exhibition was not up to the NGA’s expectations – we will never know will we?
I haven’t heard anyone from the business sector backing his $75 million estimate either and yes, I suppose any money it generated is a good thing but no, the $500K invested on behalf of the ACT ratepayers was not a good deal. Before you ask if I even went to the exhibition I will confirm that I didn’t – I had an oppotunity to see it in Italy once to see but these religio-centric depictions don’t appeal to me as “art”. This is not a criticism as I respect the appeal they would have to most Catholics but then again a lot of my Catholic colleagues didn’t go to the exhibition either.
Accordingly, I do not retract my previous criticisms.

You like to complain about things don’t you?

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13
milkman 8:35 am
13 Apr 12
#

What a success! Great to see.

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14
dpm 10:08 am
13 Apr 12
#

Snarky said :


I’m not an art student or anything, and I don’t know just how much is actually known about each painting, but by the time I hit the end I was already dreaming up a killer iphone app that would give a genuinely complete guide to the period and pieces – you could do it with info from wikipedia alone I reckon. Add in more from more specialist sites and you’d have a real and satisfying educational experience. I’d be happy to pay for THAT!

Do you mean something like this?
http://news.yahoo.com/louvre-goes-visual-nintendo-3ds-guide-142037371.html

Pity they have locked themselves into one company, but I guess they got it for free?

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15
Snarky 12:14 pm
13 Apr 12
#

dpm said :

Do you mean something like this?
http://news.yahoo.com/louvre-goes-visual-nintendo-3ds-guide-142037371.html

Pity they have locked themselves into one company, but I guess they got it for free?

Yes, something along those lines. (Why a Nintendo though??) The one you’ve linked is more a map of the entire Louvre (the data file must be VAST!) whereas I’m thinking a far more tightly constrained app, good just for that particular exhibition, and with “linking commentary” explaining some of the social, economic and political influences that engender stylistic and thematic change.

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