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Julian Assange protest comes to Canberra

By johnboy - 11 December 2010 48

Assange van [As seen in the Inner North]

Facebook brings word of a “Protest to Defend Wikileaks and Julian Assange – Canberra”, set to happen in Garema Place next Thursday.

Join the protests around Australia and the world to defend Assange and Wikileaks. The Canberra demo will be on Thursday the 16th of December – two days after Assange’s next court appearance.

Spread the word.

Briefly some thoughts on this:

    1. A lot of people are projecting their own fantasies onto Julian Assange.
    2. Almost nothing has been leaked that is news to anyone who was paying attention to the world in the first place.
    3. The actual leaker Bradley Manning is likely to die in prison making Julian Assange a hero for very little actual increase in public knowledge.
    4. Get a subscription to The Economist if you have been taken by surprise by wikileaks revelations and would like to keep up from here on in.
    5. Have a thought to your future security clearances if you start taking part in Assange protests, and remember you could get jail time for joining the “Anonymous” payback attacks.
    6. You’re a grown up, make up your own mind.

poster

UPDATE: The Register is now drawing attention to the fact that Bradley Manning’s defence fund has not had one red cent out of Wikileaks.

What’s Your opinion?


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48 Responses to
Julian Assange protest comes to Canberra
1
PedroPJ 9:47 am
10 Dec 10
#

I don’t think it’s possible to easily classify Assange as either a hero or a villain. What this whole Wikileaks saga appears to be morphing into is a realisation in the importance of democratizing information – i.e., sharing information in a way that allows citizens to actually know what their tax dollars are being spent on.

If none of this information has revealed anything that wasn’t already known, then why was it classified as secret in the first instance? Clearly there is a small subset of information that should be kept secret, information that may actually harm an individual or a state, but everything else should be in the public domain. Further, it is great that the internet community can now place pressure on companies in the same way that governments can.

For mine, I’ll attend the protest if it focuses on the right of an Australian citizen to be presumed innocent until proven guilty and the right to receive consular assistance. I will not attend if it simply designed to glorify Assange as a martyr.

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2
JessicaNumber 9:49 am
10 Dec 10
#

I’m also a fan of the Assange Love Van but Wikileaks lost its cool this year. For 10 years everyone was glad that there was a place to share secrets anonymously. Then came the paywall and the media storm.

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3
Diggety 10:11 am
10 Dec 10
#

I like the idea of WikiLeaks.

What I worry about is that Julian or anyone else who leaks, may have a political agenda other than the ‘transparency’ stance.

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4
Chaz 10:11 am
10 Dec 10
#

anyone else have a feeling that this wikileaks issue will lead to net censorship?

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5
troll-sniffer 10:16 am
10 Dec 10
#

The whole Wikileaks saga has served to show how little humans have evolved from our primitive beginnings, in that the behaviours we share with chimps of lying and deceitfulness, and the toleration of and expectation that those around of us will be dishonest and more than happy to lie as a matter of course.

Perhaps, in some future generations, when we start to mature as a species, lying will be the exception rather than the rule. My only regrtet is that I was born into a society that views lying and cheating, dishonesty and half-truths, as perfectly acceptable.

Wkileaks won’t change a thing, but it certainly shows up the deficiencies we all accept.

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6
p1 10:30 am
10 Dec 10
#

I was talking to an old guy the other day, who told me that Julian Assange and wikileaks had totally fucked over Australia and should be hunted down and shot as a terrorist.

Cold war fear of the red peril dies hard it seems.

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7
M0les 10:33 am
10 Dec 10
#

Wow.

And it’s all walled-up in BookFace.

I think there’s a special kind of irony in that. No sir, I shall not be attending, it will be only fractionally more productive that launching a cyber attack against credit-card companies.

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8
Swaggie 10:37 am
10 Dec 10
#

JessicaNumber +1

Half the crowd who turn up will just be ‘rent a mob’ who don’t know the slightest thing about wikileaks other than that it’s flavour of the week.

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9
Skidbladnir 10:49 am
10 Dec 10
#

In other news, the US State Department took a break from pursuing Wikileaks only for long enough to announce World Press Freedom Day.

Philip J. Crowley
Assistant Secretary
Daily Press Briefing
1124hrs Washington, DC December 7, 2010

MR. CROWLEY:… Just to start off, the United States is pleased to announce that we’ll host UNESCO’s World Press Freedom Day in 2011 from May 1 to May 3 here in Washington, D.C. UNESCO is the only UN agency with a mandate to promote freedom of expression, and its corollary, freedom of the press. The theme for this commemoration will be 21st Century Media: New Frontiers, New Barriers. Obviously, we decided upon this before the latest round of news.

The United States places technology and innovation at the forefront of its diplomatic and development efforts. There certainly is an irony here. New media has empowered citizens around the world to report on their circumstances, express opinions on world events, and exchange information in environments sometimes hostile to the exercise of freedom of – for the right of freedom of expression. At the same time, we are concerned about the determination of some governments to censor or silence individuals and to restrict the free flow of information. We mark events such as World Press Freedom Day in the context of our enduring commitment to support and expand press freedom and the free flow of information in this digital age.

Source transcript
Video (The above snippet occurs between 0:46 and 2:07)
His sheer awkwardness under scrutiny once he recognises the absurdity of his situation truly is a sight to behold.

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10
TVStar 10:56 am
10 Dec 10
#

I’ll be there in the background taking photos of CIA and ASIO agents. Maybe follw a couple home.

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11
Deref 11:33 am
10 Dec 10
#

Skidbladnir said :

In other news, the US State Department took a break from pursuing Wikileaks only for long enough to announce World Press Freedom Day.

Here’s a challenge to all RiotACTers – find a greater example of hypocrisy.

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12
PedroPJ 11:36 am
10 Dec 10
#

Here’s a challenge to all RiotACTers – find a greater example of hypocrisy.

The only thing that would come close is Chris Mitchell suing Julie Posetti.

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13
astrojax 12:48 pm
10 Dec 10
#

Diggety said :

I like the idea of WikiLeaks.

What I worry about is that Julian or anyone else who leaks, may have a political agenda other than the ‘transparency’ stance.

i don’t think mr assange is doing the leaking. and even if there is a political agenda to the leaks, the scale of leaked docs that allegedly exist (my understanding is wikileaks has only published a fraction of what mr manning provided) would suggest that this is beyond a political agenda…

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14
jensen 12:48 pm
10 Dec 10
#

jensen said :

Here’s a challenge to all RiotACTers – find a greater example of hypocrisy.

The only thing that would come close is Chris Mitchell suing Julie Posetti.

I need a ‘like’ button

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15
boo boo 1:00 pm
10 Dec 10
#

Boo… He’s an ideological terrorist. To the stocks with him.

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