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Kidnapping in Theodore

By johnboy - 16 June 2011 25

ACT Policing is seeking the assistance of the public in its investigation into the alleged abduction of a 16-year-old Theodore girl, who was reported to have been forced into the back seat of a vehicle by a man, taken to an unidentified house in Tuggeranong, but later escaped.

The incident occurred around 9.25am on Tuesday (June 14), when the victim, wearing black tracksuit pants and a red top, was waiting at a bus stop in Theodore. A vehicle described as an older model, dark green-coloured Holden or Ford sedan stopped alongside her, a man got out and the victim was forced into the back seat. She was driven for a short time to a house, taken inside but managed to escape.

She fled the house, running along paths in the Calwell, Chisholm, Richardson and Theodore areas until reaching her home.

The offender is described as aged in his late 20s, about 5’10”-6’ tall (178-183cm), having a stocky build, slightly tanned skin, a beard and sideburns. He was wearing a black, hooded jumper and blue adidas tracksuit pants with white stripes down the side.

Police are appealing for anyone who may have witnessed the incident and may have seen the girl, wearing black tracksuit pants and a red top, walking along pathways in the Chisholm or Richardson area, near the Calwell shops or in area of Theodore on Tuesday. Anyone with information which could assist the police investigation should contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

What’s Your opinion?


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25 Responses to
Kidnapping in Theodore
1
The Frots 2:20 pm
16 Jun 11
#

Ahhhhh………………..okay………………………

If true, they have to get this bastard. But, is it me or is there something else about this story………………….?

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2
aceofspades 2:30 pm
16 Jun 11
#

So she does not know were she escaped from, WTF!!!

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3
The Frots 2:37 pm
16 Jun 11
#

aceofspades said :

So she does not know were she escaped from, WTF!!!

Yeah……………………………

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4
androo 2:52 pm
16 Jun 11
#

aceofspades said :

So she does not know were she escaped from, WTF!!!

If you were running to get away from this creep, would you stop to take note of exactly where you were? My hunch is she ran a few blocks before figuring out where she was.

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5
Chop71 3:04 pm
16 Jun 11
#

Is it school holidays?

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6
Ate 3:08 pm
16 Jun 11
#

Certainly smells funny to me. Surely you would have taken notice of a street sign or buildings close by.

On saying that if this is true I hope she is ok and they catch this prick.

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7
Watson 3:52 pm
16 Jun 11
#

From reading the MR, I think that they have a good idea which area it was in, but it’s somewhat irrelevant to their call for witnesses. And if it were me, I would not stop to check house numbers, street signs or landmarks in a situation like that either. She would’ve been in shock and it’s lucky she managed to find her way home.

Also, in the burbs everything looks the same to me. There’s hardly any landmarks unless you’re close to a town centre. Houses, streets, parks, they all look very similar whereever you go. That’s Canberra for you…

Now, remind me to book my daughter in for those self-defence classes!

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8
Disinformation 4:09 pm
16 Jun 11
#

This reminds me of the other incidence lately where the young girl “Woke up on a park bench”.

I’m betting that we’ll hear no more of this and nobody will ever be caught.
Based largely on my expectation that there has been no crime committed.
Anyone in Tuggeranong can general orientation where they are from the skyline.
Does she really expect us to believe that she’s one of the only 16 year olds in Canberra who doesn’t have a mobile phone to call for assistance on? If you were a kidnapper, would you grab someone expecting them NOT to have a mobile? Big huge logical holes in everything going on here. More than a little suspicious….

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9
Boring_Name 5:21 pm
16 Jun 11
#

I have to admit that there is something wrong with this scenario, and not just because of the location.

I’m not a very good armchair detective, but it sounds more like the police are trying to validate the girl’s story, rather than discover anything.

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10
creative_canberran 5:27 pm
16 Jun 11
#

I’m going to pose a hypothetical, given that at 9:25am during school term, she should have been in class.
She decided that rather than sit through a boring class, she would go somewhere else. Perhaps to BF’s place, perhaps just to the shops? Either way, she wasn’t where she was suppose to be.
Asked by parents or school where she was, she gives this an excuse thinking nothing more will happen. Parents or school call police and the story stays or she gets in trouble?

Let’s be honest, the facts don’t fit.
To run though Calwell, Chisholm, Richardson and Theodore, you’d need to go in a circle almost, a very indirect route. Also, to run though all those suburbs, you would need to have chosen to bypass any number of local shops and pay phones where police could be called.

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11
dixyland 8:02 pm
16 Jun 11
#

In regards to the time, I’m supposing she’s a college student and didn’t have a class scheduled until after then.

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12
scorpio63 8:45 pm
16 Jun 11
#

Disinformation: there is (1) the age/mindset/headspace factor of a 16 year old (eg non-observant most of the time when waiting for a bus, plus most wear ear plugs listening to music and their mobiles are in their bags not pockets (2) the element of surprise and quick act catches them out, (3) if the guy was strong at any age, dragging a teenager or pushing he/she into a vehicle close by is quite easy, (4) he could have held a knife and the girl on Tuesday probably had the mentality that it was better to succumb to his demands (an assault under the Theodore bridge near the shops to an 11 year old girl by a male adult threatening with a knife produced a similar response) a few years ago, to date non-apprehended.

I taught my teenagers the following regardless of the fear that a perpetrator will sue the victim;

. eye gouge using one’s middle finger if caught in the above situation (if the perpetrator is not armed)

. My daughter kept an impulse can without the lid, sitting on top of her other items in her handbag on weekends, and on top of her books in her school bag with the zip half open. Mobile in her pocket.

. Carry a whistle in the pocket (yes, both kids had them, although my son when young had it in his school bag. There are now kids and adult safety whistles on the market here and in the U.S.

. Teach your kids that when an adult or older teenager is approaching them or has alighted from a vehicle, approaching, walk away quickly before they reach your kid, at the same time, showing the mobile in their hand. (I was approached 5 years ago by three adults in their late twenties and one in his thirties in a vehicle with NSW rego while jogging at 7pm with my collie dog in a quiet area). I learned my lesson not to jog at night. When I reached a house up further with my mobile to my ear, the three idiots drove out of tuggeranong up the highway.

. A beautiful girl I had grown up with was murdered at 18 yrs after a knife was stuck to her neck forcing her into a vehicle by 5 others. Instead of fighting in the carpark there and then, she gave in, which cost her torture and her life. Fighting an abductor in public, while trying to seek assistance, is a great deal easier than being trapped away from the public.

My kids were taught these stories before starting to catch buses.

I have had friends who have totally wrapped their kids in cotton wool, many do not educate their kids about the hundreds of psychopaths (quite a few on bike tracks striking regularly), the psychopaths (some accompanied by women) awaiting their opportunity to abduct girls and boys (gender not an issue) with psychopaths.

A simple “dont talk to strangers” does not cut it today for safety with kids.

Scenarios via education are the key.

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13
Watson 8:59 pm
16 Jun 11
#

scorpio63 said :

I have had friends who have totally wrapped their kids in cotton wool, many do not educate their kids about the hundreds of psychopaths (quite a few on bike tracks striking regularly), the psychopaths (some accompanied by women) awaiting their opportunity to abduct girls and boys (gender not an issue) with psychopaths.

A simple “dont talk to strangers” does not cut it today for safety with kids.

Scenarios via education are the key.

While I agree that teaching your kids some safety and self defence skills never goes astray… “hundreds” of psychopaths??? Where do you live?

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14
chewy14 10:44 pm
16 Jun 11
#

Scorpion,
That’s some pretty paranoid s**t.
I’m all for teaching kids about personal safety but turning into Sarah Connor is probably a bit over the top.

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15
Stevian 8:28 am
17 Jun 11
#

chewy14 said :

Scorpion,
That’s some pretty paranoid s**t.
I’m all for teaching kids about personal safety but turning into Sarah Connor is probably a bit over the top.

Ditto.

That comment about “hundreds of psychopaths” is totally divorced from reality. In most cases of assault, physical and sexual, the perpetrator is known to the victim. You are more likely to be attacked by a friend rather than a stranger.

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