Advertisement

Kitchen workers to sign that they’ve read the manual?

By 12 February 2013 14

diamant fire

The Magistrates Court has released the findings of the inquest into the Hotel Diamant fire.

The background by Coroner Walker is certainly far reaching:

When humankind learned of the quality of fire as a tool in cooking, a seductively dangerous relationship emerged. Whether in the home or commercial kitchens, fires related to the cooking process are prevalent in the ACT. With the renewed popularity of open flame cooking, it is essential that the community remain vigilant as to the installation and use of cooking systems.

This recommendation is going to cause some trouble:

Where cooking equipment is installed in a commercial kitchen, I recommend that all staff be required to sign that they have read the instruction manual as to its use before being allowed to operate it.

Please login to post your comments
14 Responses to Kitchen workers to sign that they’ve read the manual?
#1
Pork Hunt6:41 pm, 12 Feb 13

Why a coroners inquest when (luckily) no one died?

#2
cranky7:55 pm, 12 Feb 13

I’m fairly sure from the news reports that this fire was the result of incompetent maintenance of the cooking stove flue system. Something the kitchen staff would have absolutely no control over.

Not sure the Coroner has pinged the correct body.

#3
johnboy8:28 pm, 12 Feb 13

You want to believe a news report over a coroner?

#4
cranky9:29 pm, 12 Feb 13

In this case, yes.

A flaming stove should not travel to the flue system and destroy a building.

#5
bundah11:03 pm, 12 Feb 13

The coroner made the following findings as to the cause and origin of the fire:

a. At approximately 4:27 pm on 23 June 2011 a fire started in the exhaust ductwork servicing the commercial kitchen in the Flint restaurant in Tenancy 2 at Block 2, Section 24, in the Division of Acton in the Australian Capital Territory;

b. The cause of the fire was the ignition of combustible materials in the ductwork, most likely from heat or embers emanating from the wood-fired pizza oven in the Flint restaurant;

c. A spray filter device in that wood-fired pizza oven was not operational immediately before the fire. The non-operational state of that device was a significant contributing factor to the cause of the fire;

d. Access panels intended to facilitate the cleaning of the ductwork which had been provided for in engineering specifications for the ductwork were not present. The absence of these panels was a significant contributing factor to the cause of the fire.

e. The fire was accidental in nature, and not the consequence of any malicious or deliberate conduct on the part of any person.

I’ll go with her findings as to what transpired over any news reports from the Crimes.

#6
DrKoresh11:12 pm, 12 Feb 13

Seems a bit stupid to be honest. Does this include things like toasters and microwaves? Not that you’d hope there would be many microwaves in use in commercial kitchens, but would this recommendation cover toasters and stove-tops? If so, then it’s bloody stupid waste of time. I’ll concede that you’d want the operator of something a bit more exotic, like a pizza oven, to know enough not to burn down the building, but this seems like one of those laws that will waste a lot of time and ultimately achieve nothing.

#7
johnboy11:16 pm, 12 Feb 13

very few restaurants in this world that don’t have a microwave in hard use.

#8
DrKoresh11:22 pm, 12 Feb 13

That’s true, I meant that they’re not often used as a primary component of the cooking though. We didn’t have one at all at Flatheads, but we weren’t exactly a proper restaurant. Mikkel would have died of shame at the thought of using a microwave to cook, I reckon.

#9
c_c™11:47 pm, 12 Feb 13

johnboy said :

very few restaurants in this world that don’t have a microwave in hard use.

Absolutely. The now very expensive Bookplate microwaves a lot of their menu. With appalling results.

#10
screaming banshee7:07 am, 13 Feb 13

I disagree with point D, there is no guarantee that had the access points been installed that they would have been used to clean the ductwork so I would not say that was a major factor. Clearly the spray filter designed to extinguish the embers was the issue.

#11
Jivrashia9:45 am, 13 Feb 13

bundah said :

“a fire started in the exhaust ductwork”
*snip*
the ignition of combustible materials in the ductwork
*snip*
Access panels intended to facilitate the cleaning of the ductwork which had been provided for in engineering specifications for the ductwork were not present

I’ve heard of this kind of fire in kitchens before.
It’s not the first, and it definitely won’t be the last.

#12
Starrie10:23 am, 13 Feb 13

Pork Hunt said :

Why a coroners inquest when (luckily) no one died?

Coroners don’t just investigate deaths.

“A Coroner must hold an inquiry into the cause and origin of a fire that has destroyed or damaged property if requested to do so by the Attorney-General, or the Coroner is of the opinion that an inquiry into the cause and origin of the fire should be held.”
http://www.courts.act.gov.au/magistrates/courts/coroners_court

#13
gooterz6:28 pm, 13 Feb 13

Probably the simple fact that smoke is combustable in wood fires. If the fire wasn’t lit properly it could have easily sparked and exploded up the tube.

#14
Pork Hunt7:19 pm, 13 Feb 13

gooterz said :

Probably the simple fact that smoke is combustable in wood fires. If the fire wasn’t lit properly it could have easily sparked and exploded up the tube.

What?

Follow
Follow The RiotACT
Get Premium Membership
Advertisement

Are you in favour of Light Rail for Canberra?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

IMAGES OF CANBERRA

Advertisement
Sponsors
RiotACT Proudly Supports
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.