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MLA payrise

By 3 May 2014 19

Local MLAs will receive a 6% boost to their salaries come July. The Chief Minister, Katy Gallagher, was clever to keep her opinions down key whilst being interviewed on 666 radio yesterday morning – saying she had given her input to the remuneration tribunal and believed in the process. She was careful not confirm or deny support for the rise, which is understandably going down a little hard given the swathes of Canberrans likely to lose their jobs in the next 12 months, let alone stand much hope of a negotiated a payrise.

There were some cuts included in the changes, including abolition of travel allowance for partners to accompany members on business trips and a reduction in the loading pay for the Deputy Leader of the Opposition (this will only come into effect wither at the start of the Ninth Assembly or when the current holder of office relinquishes the position).

What do you think? How does a 6% pay rise sit with you? Are they worth it? Should they be taking their financial medicine like everyone else?

(Report available at the ACT Govt website)

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19 Responses to MLA payrise
#1
pepmeup10:39 am, 03 May 14

A serious question, are there any of the current MLAs who earned a higher salary in their previous pre politics life? I find our assembly very underwhelming talent wise. I would love to know if any members went into politics for anything other than money.

I can’t imagine there is another government anywhere in the western world where all members haven’t earned more money before they enter politics.

Not that earnings is everything, but I would love to see some more successful people enter our local politics, people who have achieved things in life before politics

#2
HiddenDragon10:54 am, 03 May 14

pepmeup said :

A serious question, are there any of the current MLAs who earned a higher salary in their previous pre politics life? I find our assembly very underwhelming talent wise. I would love to know if any members went into politics for anything other than money.

I can’t imagine there is another government anywhere in the western world where all members haven’t earned more money before they enter politics.

Not that earnings is everything, but I would love to see some more successful people enter our local politics, people who have achieved things in life before politics

Perhaps the shrinking career opportunities in the bureaucracy, and the related bits of what passes for the private sector in Canberra, will encourage more people to have a serious go at a political career – that could be a small silver lining in the large, looming storm clouds!

#3
wildturkeycanoe1:47 pm, 03 May 14

We as taxpayers fund these geese, yet they are the ones who determine their own pay packet?
Normally the boss who pays the salary determines how much, or if, a pay rise would be.
With the current economic “disaster” we are being reminded about daily, shouldn’t our MLAs by example be leading the way by tightening their belts? Hypocrites the lot of them.

#4
banco4:13 pm, 03 May 14

I have no problem with it. It’s roughly an EL2 salary. Hardly high living in Canberra.

#5
jasmine5:47 pm, 03 May 14

I think it is reasonable and and happy that there are cuts to spousal travel. The only comment I would make is that when governments are asking people to share the burden of budget restraints, and given the fight usually to gain even a 2% payrise for ordinary folk, it can rankle. Why not tie political salaries to public service payrises.

#6
GrumpyMark6:32 pm, 03 May 14

OK so the 6% MLA pay rise was approved by The ACT Remuneration Tribunal despite the Chief Minister suggesting the increase be the same as that for the public service.

According to the Chief Minister’s website (http://www.cmd.act.gov.au/governance/remtrib/home) “The ACT Remuneration Tribunal is an independent statutory tribunal with responsibility for setting the remuneration, allowances and entitlements for various public officials in the ACT …”

So who appoints the tribunal members?

#7
GrumpyMark6:54 pm, 03 May 14

pepmeup said :

A serious question, are there any of the current MLAs who earned a higher salary in their previous pre politics life? …

I don’t know about the others but before becoming an MLA, Simon Corbell worked in (former Federal poli) John Langmore’s electorate office. I think in those days it was about an APS 4 level.

#8
troll-sniffer10:56 pm, 03 May 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

We as taxpayers fund these geese, yet they are the ones who determine their own pay packet?
Normally the boss who pays the salary determines how much, or if, a pay rise would be.
With the current economic “disaster” we are being reminded about daily, shouldn’t our MLAs by example be leading the way by tightening their belts? Hypocrites the lot of them.

A usual WTC speaks volumes from a position of total ignorance. MLA’s pay is set by a remuneration tribunal which is essentially independent. However, these tribunals do often appear to be over-generous with their dispensations.

#9
wildturkeycanoe7:49 am, 04 May 14

GrumpyMark said :

OK so the 6% MLA pay rise was approved by The ACT Remuneration Tribunal despite the Chief Minister suggesting the increase be the same as that for the public service.

According to the Chief Minister’s website (http://www.cmd.act.gov.au/governance/remtrib/home) “The ACT Remuneration Tribunal is an independent statutory tribunal with responsibility for setting the remuneration, allowances and entitlements for various public officials in the ACT …”

So who appoints the tribunal members?

GrumpyMark said :

OK so the 6% MLA pay rise was approved by The ACT Remuneration Tribunal despite the Chief Minister suggesting the increase be the same as that for the public service.

According to the Chief Minister’s website (http://www.cmd.act.gov.au/governance/remtrib/home) “The ACT Remuneration Tribunal is an independent statutory tribunal with responsibility for setting the remuneration, allowances and entitlements for various public officials in the ACT …”

So who appoints the tribunal members?

The Executive. But who that is nobody knows.

#10
rosscoact9:22 am, 04 May 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

GrumpyMark said :

OK so the 6% MLA pay rise was approved by The ACT Remuneration Tribunal despite the Chief Minister suggesting the increase be the same as that for the public service.

According to the Chief Minister’s website (http://www.cmd.act.gov.au/governance/remtrib/home) “The ACT Remuneration Tribunal is an independent statutory tribunal with responsibility for setting the remuneration, allowances and entitlements for various public officials in the ACT …”

So who appoints the tribunal members?

GrumpyMark said :

OK so the 6% MLA pay rise was approved by The ACT Remuneration Tribunal despite the Chief Minister suggesting the increase be the same as that for the public service.

According to the Chief Minister’s website (http://www.cmd.act.gov.au/governance/remtrib/home) “The ACT Remuneration Tribunal is an independent statutory tribunal with responsibility for setting the remuneration, allowances and entitlements for various public officials in the ACT …”

So who appoints the tribunal members?

The Executive. But who that is nobody knows.

The Executive is Cabinet

#11
Masquara10:05 am, 04 May 14

banco said :

I have no problem with it. It’s roughly an EL2 salary. Hardly high living in Canberra.

EL2s don’t get defined superannuation at around $90,000 a year, available at any age upon leaving the Assembly, and after a single term.

#12
miz10:55 am, 04 May 14

Personally I have a problem with the claimed ‘independence’ of the remuneration tribunal, noting that the spokesperson who appeared in the CT story seems to be involved in a lot of stuff in Canberra.

And hard questions should be asked about any salary increases higher than the usual measures (CPI, average weekly earnings). Politicians are basically ‘on a contract’ for four years and their performance is measured at the ballot box, and understand this fully when they enter into it, unlike yesteryear when contractual employment was unusual.

#13
gazket12:18 pm, 04 May 14

There was a lady on the radio from the remuneration tribunal. she couldn’t explain how they made the 6% pay rise. She said the is no formula but federal public servants make more so we had to raise the pay rate.

Katy is always saying the ACT population is small yet on the other foot we need more money because we have a large work load and multiple portfolio’s. If the pollies stop fighting over he said she said politics they may actually be productive.

Katy Gallagher Let them eat cake

#14
Garfield1:56 pm, 04 May 14

Masquara said :

banco said :

I have no problem with it. It’s roughly an EL2 salary. Hardly high living in Canberra.

EL2s don’t get defined superannuation at around $90,000 a year, available at any age upon leaving the Assembly, and after a single term.

You’re confusing the Assembly and the Federal Parliament, and overestimating the super that Federal Parliamentarians get. Upon leaving the Assembly, our MLA’s do not get a pension. I was talking to an ex MLA a couple of years ago and after leaving the Assembly they were definitely not getting a taxpayer funded pension. Last year the Canberra Times reported that Gary Humphries would be receiving a pension of around $80,000 p.a. after his 11 years as a senator – well short of $90,000 after one term.

I’m not saying one way or another whether the federal pollies deserve the level of pension they receive, but if we want to talk about this, lets get the basics right.

#15
Masquara4:24 pm, 04 May 14

Garfield said :

Masquara said :

banco said :

I have no problem with it. It’s roughly an EL2 salary. Hardly high living in Canberra.

EL2s don’t get defined superannuation at around $90,000 a year, available at any age upon leaving the Assembly, and after a single term.

You’re confusing the Assembly and the Federal Parliament, and overestimating the super that Federal Parliamentarians get. Upon leaving the Assembly, our MLA’s do not get a pension. I was talking to an ex MLA a couple of years ago and after leaving the Assembly they were definitely not getting a taxpayer funded pension. Last year the Canberra Times reported that Gary Humphries would be receiving a pension of around $80,000 p.a. after his 11 years as a senator – well short of $90,000 after one term.

I’m not saying one way or another whether the federal pollies deserve the level of pension they receive, but if we want to talk about this, lets get the basics right.

Oooooh yes they do. Who told you ACT politicians don’t have their own fat little super system to dip into? My neighbour is an MLA one-termer and on an exceptionally generous superannuation “wage”. Far higher than the average wage. Which they supplement with fulltime work in the public service !!! (They are, not surprisingly, happy to be rather junior in their current work, little responsibility, and marvellously subsidised by that four year term) … as you can imagine they enjoy a rather superb lifestyle despite being in a very junior, “optional work, keeps me busy” position in the bureaucracy!

#16
goggles135:46 am, 05 May 14

Masquara said :

Garfield said :

Masquara said :

banco said :

I have no problem with it. It’s roughly an EL2 salary. Hardly high living in Canberra.

EL2s don’t get defined superannuation at around $90,000 a year, available at any age upon leaving the Assembly, and after a single term.

You’re confusing the Assembly and the Federal Parliament, and overestimating the super that Federal Parliamentarians get. Upon leaving the Assembly, our MLA’s do not get a pension. I was talking to an ex MLA a couple of years ago and after leaving the Assembly they were definitely not getting a taxpayer funded pension. Last year the Canberra Times reported that Gary Humphries would be receiving a pension of around $80,000 p.a. after his 11 years as a senator – well short of $90,000 after one term.

I’m not saying one way or another whether the federal pollies deserve the level of pension they receive, but if we want to talk about this, lets get the basics right.

Oooooh yes they do. Who told you ACT politicians don’t have their own fat little super system to dip into? My neighbour is an MLA one-termer and on an exceptionally generous superannuation “wage”. Far higher than the average wage. Which they supplement with fulltime work in the public service !!! (They are, not surprisingly, happy to be rather junior in their current work, little responsibility, and marvellously subsidised by that four year term) … as you can imagine they enjoy a rather superb lifestyle despite being in a very junior, “optional work, keeps me busy” position in the bureaucracy!

why do politicians get immediate access to super when they leave parliament/legislative assembly when the rest of us have to wait?

its about time everyone was treated the same, regardless of their profession. like everyone else, politicians should be required to show real efficiencies to justify payrises which should be limited to cost of living increases and no more.

#17
dungfungus7:53 am, 05 May 14

goggles13 said :

Masquara said :

Garfield said :

Masquara said :

banco said :

I have no problem with it. It’s roughly an EL2 salary. Hardly high living in Canberra.

EL2s don’t get defined superannuation at around $90,000 a year, available at any age upon leaving the Assembly, and after a single term.

You’re confusing the Assembly and the Federal Parliament, and overestimating the super that Federal Parliamentarians get. Upon leaving the Assembly, our MLA’s do not get a pension. I was talking to an ex MLA a couple of years ago and after leaving the Assembly they were definitely not getting a taxpayer funded pension. Last year the Canberra Times reported that Gary Humphries would be receiving a pension of around $80,000 p.a. after his 11 years as a senator – well short of $90,000 after one term.

I’m not saying one way or another whether the federal pollies deserve the level of pension they receive, but if we want to talk about this, lets get the basics right.

Oooooh yes they do. Who told you ACT politicians don’t have their own fat little super system to dip into? My neighbour is an MLA one-termer and on an exceptionally generous superannuation “wage”. Far higher than the average wage. Which they supplement with fulltime work in the public service !!! (They are, not surprisingly, happy to be rather junior in their current work, little responsibility, and marvellously subsidised by that four year term) … as you can imagine they enjoy a rather superb lifestyle despite being in a very junior, “optional work, keeps me busy” position in the bureaucracy!

why do politicians get immediate access to super when they leave parliament/legislative assembly when the rest of us have to wait?

its about time everyone was treated the same, regardless of their profession. like everyone else, politicians should be required to show real efficiencies to justify payrises which should be limited to cost of living increases and no more.

I am aware that Gary Humphries took all his ACT Legislative Aseembly super as a lump sum.
It would be interesting to know if ACT MLAs’ super is funded and who the fund managers are. My bet it would be one if the Industry Super Funds.

#18
davo10110:09 am, 05 May 14

Masquara said :

Oooooh yes they do. Who told you ACT politicians don’t have their own fat little super system to dip into? My neighbour is an MLA one-termer and on an exceptionally generous superannuation “wage”. Far higher than the average wage. Which they supplement with fulltime work in the public service !!!

goggles13 said :

why do politicians get immediate access to super when they leave parliament/legislative assembly when the rest of us have to wait?

dungfungus said :

I am aware that Gary Humphries took all his ACT Legislative Aseembly super as a lump sum. It would be interesting to know if ACT MLAs’ super is funded and who the fund managers are. My bet it would be one if the Industry Super Funds.

Shame you’re all wrong. A quick perusal of the Legislative Assembly (Members’ Superannuation) Act 1991 would tell you how the system actually works. The one-term wonder would have received one-year’s salary as a lump sum. Unless they are 55 years or older and not working they have to roll the lump sum over into a eligible choice fund. Anyone elected at the 2008 election or later is on the new accumulation scheme where they get an employer’s contribution of 14% of their salary (to the fund of their choice), which is pretty much what the rest of the public service is entitled to.

#19
dungfungus10:36 am, 05 May 14

davo101 said :

Masquara said :

Oooooh yes they do. Who told you ACT politicians don’t have their own fat little super system to dip into? My neighbour is an MLA one-termer and on an exceptionally generous superannuation “wage”. Far higher than the average wage. Which they supplement with fulltime work in the public service !!!

goggles13 said :

why do politicians get immediate access to super when they leave parliament/legislative assembly when the rest of us have to wait?

dungfungus said :

I am aware that Gary Humphries took all his ACT Legislative Aseembly super as a lump sum. It would be interesting to know if ACT MLAs’ super is funded and who the fund managers are. My bet it would be one if the Industry Super Funds.

Shame you’re all wrong. A quick perusal of the Legislative Assembly (Members’ Superannuation) Act 1991 would tell you how the system actually works. The one-term wonder would have received one-year’s salary as a lump sum. Unless they are 55 years or older and not working they have to roll the lump sum over into a eligible choice fund. Anyone elected at the 2008 election or later is on the new accumulation scheme where they get an employer’s contribution of 14% of their salary (to the fund of their choice), which is pretty much what the rest of the public service is entitled to.

Well, the source for my claim was Gary Humphries himself, but politicians do sometimes tell porkies.

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