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More than 1000 breath tested this June long weekend

By 10 June 2014 13

ACT Policing carried out 1095 random breath tests this June long weekend (Friday 6 – Monday 9 June 2014) and issued 106 fines to motorists for traffic infringements in the ACT despite repeated warnings about increased police presence.

The majority of the TINS were issued for speeding (38) followed by unregistered vehicles (21). A further 60 cautions were handed out.

This was, however, a slight improvement on last year when 137 TINS were issued over the 2013 June long weekend and 50 were caught speeding.

Of the 1095 random breath tests, 10 people were caught drink driving.

While no deaths or serious injury occurred across the region, 13 motor vehicle collisions occurred including one with minor injuries which is being investigated by ACT Policing’s Collision Investigation and Reconstruction Team.

ACT Policing worked closely with NSW Police to conduct a number of joint patrol activities including one which resulted in the arrest of man driving up to 140km/h in a 100km/h zone on Saturday afternoon (June 7).

Later that evening, ACT Policing detected a Kawasaki motorcycle travelling at 173km/h in a 100km/h zone on the Monaro Highway. The driver returned a Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of .112. He was issued with an Immediate Suspension Notice directing him not to drive. Later that night, he was detected again riding the same motorcycle on Monaro Highway and was stopped again by police, then returning a BAC reading was .051.

The man was arrested and lodged in the ACT Watch House, charged with drunk driving, dangerous driving, speeding and driving with a suspension notice in effect.

Traffic Operations Station Sergeant Rod Anderson said while the majority of Canberrans did the right thing, there were still members of the community who chose to ignore warnings from police.

”We’re grateful there were no fatalities or serious injuries over the long weekend and although the majority of road users were well behaved, some chose to ignore the warnings and the increased police presence on our roads,” Sergeant Anderson said.

“Those drivers received fines, double demerit points or will face court in relation to their manner of driving.”

Sergeant Anderson said Operation Snowsafe will continue through the snow season to the October long weekend with police targeting speeding, impaired driving, seatbelt offences and driver fatigue on roads leading to and from the snow fields.

ACT Policing will continue to target driver distraction during the month of June as part of its ongoing road safety campaign.

(Media Release ACT Policing)

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13 Responses to
More than 1000 breath tested this June long weekend
2620watcher 6:36 pm
10 Jun 14
#1

Did I read this right, 10% of breath tests resulted in some sort of infringement being handed out. And 1% of drivers were drunk.
Appalling.

patrick_keogh 7:27 pm
10 Jun 14
#2

2620watcher said :

Did I read this right, 10% of breath tests resulted in some sort of infringement being handed out. And 1% of drivers were drunk.
Appalling.

No, you didn’t read it right. The two figures, “number of breath tests” and “number of infringements” are related, but not in this simple way. Put simply, not all infringements over the long weekend were the result of breath testing. Just out and about in the city over the weekend I personally witnessed three drivers pulled over for some offence nowhere near a breath testing operation.

Elsewhere in the article it is clear that there were ten DPCA offences detected by routine breath testing which is your <1%. These same road stops probably yielded some additional offences but it is not clear what fraction of the 106 fines were as a result of these stops. Of course the number of offences does not equal the number of offenders, so the 106 offences might really be sixty or seventy driver/vehicle combinations.

bigfeet 8:22 pm
10 Jun 14
#3

patrick_keogh said :

[. Just out and about in the city over the weekend I personally witnessed three drivers pulled over for some offence nowhere near a breath testing operation.

That doesn’t mean that they weren’t breath tested. Police can test anyone they pull over for any reason, it doesn’t have to be part of a big road-side set up. In fact they can just pull you over to breath test you without any other reason.

I would say on a week-end were they were having a big operation and wanted stats anyone pulled over for any reason would be likely to be tested.

Spectra 10:09 am
11 Jun 14
#4

Also, apparently the police don’t know what the word “majority” means…

Very Busy 10:30 am
11 Jun 14
#5

Could we also have the figures for how many drivers were issued TINs for failing to use indicators, crossing unbroken lines, using fog lights in clear weather and obstructing their vision with GPS and mobile phone holders?

davo101 11:26 am
11 Jun 14
#6

Spectra said :

Also, apparently the police don’t know what the word “majority” means…

Depends, it’s a question of style. In US English majority means the sub-set that covers more than half the set, in British English it means the greater number.

Spectra 12:14 pm
11 Jun 14
#7

davo101 said :

Spectra said :

Also, apparently the police don’t know what the word “majority” means…

Depends, it’s a question of style. In US English majority means the sub-set that covers more than half the set, in British English it means the greater number.

Well I’ll be damned. I have learned a thing.

bikhet 4:13 pm
11 Jun 14
#8

davo101 said :

Spectra said :

Also, apparently the police don’t know what the word “majority” means…

Depends, it’s a question of style. In US English majority means the sub-set that covers more than half the set, in British English it means the greater number.

I’m feeling bored today, so here goes.

In US English a plurality is what in UK English would be called a majority – unless, of course, it was more than half, in which case it would be a majority is both forms of English.

And I think davo101 means “greatest” rather than “greater.” If the comparative was appropriate there would be only two things being compared and so if one was greater than the other it would have more than half – ignoring informals, don’t knows, etc of course. For more than two you would use the superlative.

davo101 5:09 pm
11 Jun 14
#9

bikhet said :

In US English a plurality is what in UK English would be called a majority – unless, of course, it was more than half, in which case it would be a majority is both forms of English.

Usually in British English that’s referred to as an absolute majority or overall majority.

bikhet said :

And I think davo101 means “greatest” rather than “greater.”

Have to admit I cheated and just copied that definition from the Oxford dictionary.

Tenpoints 12:13 pm
12 Jun 14
#10

Very Busy said :

Could we also have the figures for how many drivers were issued TINs for failing to use indicators, crossing unbroken lines, using fog lights in clear weather and obstructing their vision with GPS and mobile phone holders?

How many drivers have actually failed to indicate or crossed unbroken lines in direct sight of a police officer and gotten away with it? Maybe you should go vigilante with your dashcam to flag the offenders.
As for foglights, the severity of the offence does not justify the time cost of trying to prove whether the weather was sufficiently “clear” in court.
With respect to GPS and mobile phone holders: Still a better option than google maps in the palm of your hand. Given the choice, I’d pick the lesser of two evils.

Very Busy 2:16 pm
12 Jun 14
#11

Tenpoints said :

Very Busy said :

Could we also have the figures for how many drivers were issued TINs for failing to use indicators, crossing unbroken lines, using fog lights in clear weather and obstructing their vision with GPS and mobile phone holders?

How many drivers have actually failed to indicate or crossed unbroken lines in direct sight of a police officer and gotten away with it? Maybe you should go vigilante with your dashcam to flag the offenders.
As for foglights, the severity of the offence does not justify the time cost of trying to prove whether the weather was sufficiently “clear” in court.
With respect to GPS and mobile phone holders: Still a better option than google maps in the palm of your hand. Given the choice, I’d pick the lesser of two evils.

….and this, my friends is exactly the attitude that the authorities are encouraging by their lack of enforcement. Zero points for you!!!

1. So there’s no police around, so I’ll break the law.
2. It’s quite all right to flaunt the road rules because they cant prove I did it.
3. I just need to have my travel plan or my next sms right in my line of sight, it doesn’t matter about that little kid who I killed because he rode his bike out infront of me.

Time and time again, Rod Anderson comes out saying how disappointed he is with the attitude of Canberra motorists. Yet nothing is being done to change anything.

People need to be encouraged to take driving more seriously. As long as it is quite ok for drivers to break the vast majority of the road rules we will continue to see the bad attitude that we currently see. The focus on only a couple of the road rules breeds contempt. If the road rules shouldn’t be enforced, then they shouldn’t be road rules in the first place.

I have absolutely no doubt whatsoever that there is a direct correlation between the lack of enforcement of the majority of the road rules and the numbers of drivers breaking the rules that do get enforced. So if all the road rules are enforced there will be a positive trend in the number of drivers who habitually speed, text, DUI and drive unlicensed or unregistered.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 3:41 pm
12 Jun 14
#12

Why bother obeying the rules when you
a) disagree with them and
b) know they won’t be enforced.

Every morning driving in to work the traffic slows down for the 2 speed cameras on the major road I use. Everyone slows down 10-15km/h then just speeds back up.

We need to look at some better models for traffic management, that focus on better traffic flow, better driver skill and attitude and driving more cooperatively.

Tenpoints 4:47 pm
15 Jun 14
#13

Very Busy said :

….and this, my friends is exactly the attitude that the authorities are encouraging by their lack of enforcement. Zero points for you!!!

1. So there’s no police around, so I’ll break the law.
2. It’s quite all right to flaunt the road rules because they cant prove I did it.
3. I just need to have my travel plan or my next sms right in my line of sight, it doesn’t matter about that little kid who I killed because he rode his bike out infront of me.

Time and time again, Rod Anderson comes out saying how disappointed he is with the attitude of Canberra motorists. Yet nothing is being done to change anything.

People need to be encouraged to take driving more seriously. As long as it is quite ok for drivers to break the vast majority of the road rules we will continue to see the bad attitude that we currently see. The focus on only a couple of the road rules breeds contempt. If the road rules shouldn’t be enforced, then they shouldn’t be road rules in the first place.

I have absolutely no doubt whatsoever that there is a direct correlation between the lack of enforcement of the majority of the road rules and the numbers of drivers breaking the rules that do get enforced. So if all the road rules are enforced there will be a positive trend in the number of drivers who habitually speed, text, DUI and drive unlicensed or unregistered.

Hang on, didn’t you just contradict yourself?

Tenpoints said :

“there is a direct correlation between the lack of enforcement of the majority of the road rules and the numbers of drivers breaking the rules”

and…

Tenpoints said :

“if all the road rules are enforced there will be a positive trend in the number of drivers who habitually [break the rules]”

I’m going to guess from your argument that your first statement is the one you actually mean and go on that.

I maintain that my original points are valid. Not everyone in society is a moral perfectionist when it comes to driving or well, everything else in life. People are always going to find ways to wrought the system for their own selfish convenience, hence the bad behaviour you vehemently oppose.

By the way, it p#$ses me off too. I’m not defending their behaviour, I’m rationalising it (selfish convenience remember). Some of the issues you raised are difficult to detect or prove by police. You can ping people for a dash mounted GPS, then they’ll just hide it in their hand. It’s a lot easier to catch someone speeding than it is to catch someone texting. It’s hard to even imagine a method of detecting texting with current without numerous social (and probably legal also) privacy issues, and also the sheer cost of such advanced technology…

While the police force does currently seem to be a bit thin on the pan, I don’t think more police will solve the issues raised. You need to train and inspire the masses rather than cull them into fear. It’s better for society.

I think everyone who wants a licence should go through a mandatory driver training course including save driving theory and practical car control in adverse situations. I believe that will –above all else- increase the amount of awareness, responsibility and skill on our roads, for most people…

But until that happens, I recommend strapping a dash-cam on. It might save your bacon if you collide with any number of numpties on the road today.

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