NBN Co Gungahlin pilot meeting tonight

By 15 June, 2011 31

NBN Co will be conducting an information meeting at the Gungahlin Library tonight from 7.00 to 9.00pm.

Most people would be aware that the original timeframe of starting work this February has blown out due to a range of factors, not least being the ongoing negotiations with Telstra on NBN taking over their infrastructure.

But given recent progress, NBN Co will provide updates on their plans for construction of the pilot installation in Gungahlin and what will happen then, community engagement and what the recent Digital Economy announcement means for Gungahlin.

Plenty of time will be provided for Q&A.

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31 Responses to NBN Co Gungahlin pilot meeting tonight
#1
Gungahlin Al6:36 am, 16 Jun 11

I was live blogging from the meeting (well until Origin called – then vicariously through reposting some tweets) so anyone interested can check the details discussed on our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/gungahlin

The good news for everyone here is that it isn’t just about Gungahlin nor is it just 3000 premises. Once they start, they’ll just keep going.

Interesting also that at the peak nationwide rollout, they expect to be connecting some 6000 premises a day!

#2
Gungahlin Al9:40 am, 16 Jun 11

ABC coverage of the meeting: http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/06/16/3245066.htm

There were over 100 people there – on an Origin night. Must have been Victorians organised it…

#3
shadow boxer11:32 am, 16 Jun 11

The end of next year, my this is going swimmingly…..

Two years behind schedule, massive costs blow outs and we haven’t even started on the biggest Government run project in Australian history.

I can see the storm clouds gathering, when the tornado touches down the billions of dollars will be sucked into the vortex never to be seen again.

#4
The Frots12:28 pm, 16 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

ABC coverage of the meeting: http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/06/16/3245066.htm

There were over 100 people there – on an Origin night. Must have been Victorians organised it…

Great updates Al – let’s hope that they deliver.

#5
Gungahlin Al1:05 pm, 16 Jun 11

shadow boxer said :

The end of next year, my this is going swimmingly…..

Two years behind schedule, massive costs blow outs and we haven’t even started on the biggest Government run project in Australian history.

I can see the storm clouds gathering, when the tornado touches down the billions of dollars will be sucked into the vortex never to be seen again.

SB: My aren’t we glass-half-empty? That isn’t for the originally announced 3000-premise pilot – that is Xmas next year for ALL of Gungahlin connected. And given your stated concerns about preventing problems, wouldn’t you *prefer* that they work through the pilot phase carefully so that things don’t derail during the full-on roll-out?

They did say that they are in the last stages of negotiating the 2000-page contract to buy Telstra’s network. So once that is squared aware (within days they predicted), it will be full-on.

Thanks Frots for the feedback.

#6
shadow boxer2:20 pm, 16 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

shadow boxer said :

The end of next year, my this is going swimmingly…..

Two years behind schedule, massive costs blow outs and we haven’t even started on the biggest Government run project in Australian history.

I can see the storm clouds gathering, when the tornado touches down the billions of dollars will be sucked into the vortex never to be seen again.

SB: My aren’t we glass-half-empty? That isn’t for the originally announced 3000-premise pilot – that is Xmas next year for ALL of Gungahlin connected. And given your stated concerns about preventing problems, wouldn’t you *prefer* that they work through the pilot phase carefully so that things don’t derail during the full-on roll-out?

They did say that they are in the last stages of negotiating the 2000-page contract to buy Telstra’s network. So once that is squared aware (within days they predicted), it will be full-on.

Thanks Frots for the feedback.

Yeh thats not so bad if it’s all of Gungahlin, Do you want a bottle of Red on them delivering ?

#7
Chop713:06 pm, 16 Jun 11

What do they charge to sign up?

#8
thatsnotme3:21 pm, 16 Jun 11

Chop71 said :

What do they charge to sign up?

Nothing. If you elect to be connected to the NBN, during the rollout fibre will be laid to your home, and a network termination box installed. It’s then up to you to sign up with a service provider for telephone and/or internet services. The actual connection costs you nothing though.

#9
Gungahlin Al3:29 pm, 16 Jun 11

Chop71 said :

What do they charge to sign up?

Zip. Free Network Termination Unit (read: modem/router), fibre to the wall of the home, but you’ll need an ISP account of course. There was some discussion about transition of accounts last night, but it was after I scarpered to watch the footy sorry.

SB: I’d take you up on that – but then Telstra is involved…

#10
shadow boxer3:58 pm, 16 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

Chop71 said :

What do they charge to sign up?

Zip. Free Network Termination Unit (read: modem/router), fibre to the wall of the home, but you’ll need an ISP account of course. There was some discussion about transition of accounts last night, but it was after I scarpered to watch the footy sorry.

SB: I’d take you up on that – but then Telstra is involved…

haha, too true, I think Gungahlin will be o.k. the really hard work (as Transact found out) is in digging trenches. Horrendously expensive.

#11
Gungahlin Al4:59 pm, 16 Jun 11

shadow boxer said :

Gungahlin Al said :

Chop71 said :

What do they charge to sign up?

Zip. Free Network Termination Unit (read: modem/router), fibre to the wall of the home, but you’ll need an ISP account of course. There was some discussion about transition of accounts last night, but it was after I scarpered to watch the footy sorry.

SB: I’d take you up on that – but then Telstra is involved…

haha, too true, I think Gungahlin will be o.k. the really hard work (as Transact found out) is in digging trenches. Horrendously expensive.

Ha. Last night they said they got a surprise when doing the Armidale pilot rollout. Trenching in basalt. I recall he said that on the hardness scale where diamonds are 10, basalt is 7. Note to self for future installations methinks…

#12
welkin315:47 pm, 16 Jun 11

I have read what I can on this NBN – Gungahlin thing – and nobody ever mentions when the suburbs will be connected – and how the cost might compare with the $’s we now spend.

#13
Gungahlin Al6:15 pm, 16 Jun 11

welkin31 said :

I have read what I can on this NBN – Gungahlin thing – and nobody ever mentions when the suburbs will be connected – and how the cost might compare with the $’s we now spend.

When talking about Gungahlin in this context, we’ve been referring to the district – not the town centre.

There was some discussion about ISP costs last night, and Darren from NBN Co mentioned some very cheap initial plans in the pilot sites, but if I recall qualified that this is something for ISPs to set in an open market. Sorry I can’t recall the specifics.

You’ll be able to check this out as soon as Dave gets the video processed and uploaded to our website – he filmed the entire meeting, as we always do.

Meantime, I see the Fin Review is suggesting the deal with Telstra could go through by Tuesday. A link to the article is on our GCC Facebook page, which today broke through 500 fans. Woo hoo!

#14
helium6:18 pm, 16 Jun 11

They could start with part of Ngunnawal that had fibre laid in 1994, back then we struggled with 19.2K dial up.

Holding my breath for NBN. No

#15
dungfungus7:58 pm, 16 Jun 11

It was announced on the TV news tonight that Gungahlin would be the next NBN test region.
So, where does this leave TransACT?

#16
Gungahlin Al9:18 am, 17 Jun 11

dungfungus said :

It was announced on the TV news tonight that Gungahlin would be the next NBN test region.
So, where does this leave TransACT?

DF: NBN Co are negotiating to take over the Transact fibre network. But as people on that are already experiencing good connect speeds, I’d guess it’s a little down the priority list. Just me surmising, note.

#17
dungfungus9:53 am, 17 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

dungfungus said :

It was announced on the TV news tonight that Gungahlin would be the next NBN test region.
So, where does this leave TransACT?

DF: NBN Co are negotiating to take over the Transact fibre network. But as people on that are already experiencing good connect speeds, I’d guess it’s a little down the priority list. Just me surmising, note.

Gee, that’s good news then!
Let’s hope they pay TransACT about $300 million for it and that way TranaACT will be able to repay most of the $70 odd million that it owes ACTEW (aka Canberra ratepayers)

#18
Mysteryman10:13 am, 17 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

shadow boxer said :

The end of next year, my this is going swimmingly…..

Two years behind schedule, massive costs blow outs and we haven’t even started on the biggest Government run project in Australian history.

I can see the storm clouds gathering, when the tornado touches down the billions of dollars will be sucked into the vortex never to be seen again.

SB: My aren’t we glass-half-empty? That isn’t for the originally announced 3000-premise pilot – that is Xmas next year for ALL of Gungahlin connected. And given your stated concerns about preventing problems, wouldn’t you *prefer* that they work through the pilot phase carefully so that things don’t derail during the full-on roll-out?

They did say that they are in the last stages of negotiating the 2000-page contract to buy Telstra’s network. So once that is squared aware (within days they predicted), it will be full-on.

Thanks Frots for the feedback.

What part of the Telstra network are they buying? And why?

#19
Primal10:23 am, 17 Jun 11

welkin31 said :

I have read what I can on this NBN – Gungahlin thing – and nobody ever mentions when the suburbs will be connected

I think the “End of 2012″ date mentioned in a few places is referring to the entire Gung region. Question is just how far NBN thinks that region extends…

#20
magiccar910:52 am, 17 Jun 11

Gungahlin Al said :

Chop71 said :

What do they charge to sign up?

Zip. Free Network Termination Unit (read: modem/router), fibre to the wall of the home, but you’ll need an ISP account of course.

Yes, but from what I’ve heard there is going to be a limited amount of service providers. Little competition means highly inflated prices. Back we go to being a nation known for our poor technology uptake. For my 2 cents worth, the government should have been investing their ~40B in wireless technology.
Reports are coming out every day telling us that we are moving to a smartphone/tablet computing era, smartphones sales are skyrocketing – yet the government still thinks we need “high speed” land line connections! The US is moving past 4G technology while we are still trying to grasp 3G. Come on! HA!

#21
Gungahlin Al10:56 am, 17 Jun 11

Mysteryman said :

What part of the Telstra network are they buying? And why?

Buy may have been the wrong term for me to use. GCC VP Peter Elford is our point guy on broadband, and has been meeting with the various players every couple of weeks. He just doesn’t play in the RA sandpit, so I’m doing my best from a lower info base. I think this clarifies it somewhat:

“The Heads of Agreement with Telstra, if formalised by way of binding agreements, will reduce NBN rollout costs by giving NBN Co access to Telstra’s existing infrastructure such as underground ducts, exchanges and transmission. We also expect to dramatically reduce the NBN’s revenue risk with the Telstra Heads of Agreement outlining the decommissioning of the copper access network as the fibre network is rolled out.”

From NBN Co’s FAQs: http://nbnco.com.au/wps/wcm/connect/main/site-base/resources/about-nbn-co/faqs/

#22
Mysteryman11:15 am, 17 Jun 11

I’d rather they had nothing to do with Telstra at all, to be honest. In my mind, Telstra are the reason Australia’s telecommunications infrastructure is lacking. They had the monopoly for a long time and did very little to better our broadband or mobile communications when they had the chance, even though they were still charging quite a lot for the basic services they were providing. They placed RIMs in many new suburbs around Canberra, consequently limiting the broadband speeds to that of obsolete technology. Then they decided they didn’t want to be part of the broadband rollout because it didn’t suit them. Then they wanted back in.

I’d have preferred they were left behind and we moved on without them.

#23
thatsnotme11:18 am, 17 Jun 11

magiccar9 said :

Gungahlin Al said :

Chop71 said :

What do they charge to sign up?

Zip. Free Network Termination Unit (read: modem/router), fibre to the wall of the home, but you’ll need an ISP account of course.

Yes, but from what I’ve heard there is going to be a limited amount of service providers. Little competition means highly inflated prices. Back we go to being a nation known for our poor technology uptake. For my 2 cents worth, the government should have been investing their ~40B in wireless technology.
Reports are coming out every day telling us that we are moving to a smartphone/tablet computing era, smartphones sales are skyrocketing – yet the government still thinks we need “high speed” land line connections! The US is moving past 4G technology while we are still trying to grasp 3G. Come on! HA!

This whole ‘we should be relying on wireless’ argument is one of the most ridiculous in the entire NBN debate. Wireless is great for mobility, but to suggest that we have the spectrum and capacity available to put everyone on a wireless connection – whether at home, or out and about – just doesn’t add up. How many people do you know who are comfortable living next to a mobile tower? Because if we go fully wireless, you can expect them to be everywhere.

The sooner people stop thinking that the NBN is just about their connection to the internet, the more rational this whole debate will become. The connection will – eventually – be your link to television, movies, the internet, your telephone line, video conferencing (whether to work, to study, or to talk to friends and family), and stuff we haven’t even thought of yet. Think about the copper network we currently use – nobody would have imagined that it was going to be our internet connection when it was originally laid.

I think there will be plenty of competition when it comes to service providers as well. Possibly not as much in the very early days, but as more people are connected, service providers will begin to release more plans. In the early days, I expect that if people want to sign up to plans that utilise the full potential of the new connection, that these will be quite expensive. But most people will have access to plans with similar limits, and likely far greater speed, that are priced at about the same level as existing ADSL plans.

#24
puggy11:22 am, 17 Jun 11

magiccar9 said :

For my 2 cents worth, the government should have been investing their ~40B in wireless technology

And that’s why you’re not in charge. The frequnecy spectrum is a little like land, there’s a lot of it but certainly a finite amount and there’s a finite amout that is actually useful. And just like land, no two people can be on the same patch at the same time.

There’s enough pressure on the frequency spectrum as it is at the moment, without trying to connect everyone at high speed. Anyway, those base stations have to be connnected back to something, which is via either more “wireless” (point-to-point links) or fibre. So if you’re going to run fibre to the multitude of base stations that would be required (every 1 or 2km), then you might as well run the fibre to the home.

Fibre also has much more scope for technology advancements. Recent experiments have hit 26 Terrabits per second over a single fibre. All it needs is for the nodes on the end to be upgraded. Wireless technologies are starting to get very close to the limit for bits per second per Hertz, and it’s the amount of Hertz available that is very limited between 400MHz and 3GHz.

magiccar9 said :

Reports are coming out every day telling us that we are moving to a smartphone/tablet computing era, smartphones sales are skyrocketing – yet the government still thinks we need “high speed” land line connections! The US is moving past 4G technology while we are still trying to grasp 3G. Come on! HA!

Yes, smartphone sales are skyrocketing, but the applications the NBN is aiming for (blue sky stuff) aren’t aimed at smart phones. Anyway, there will still be commercial networks to take care of the mobile stuff and they are about to get more spectrum. To be padantic, no one in the world has introduced true 4G as originally defined by the ITU (they have since redefined it due to pressure from carriers), so the US certainly isn’t moving past it. To Australia’s credit, Telstra was the first in the world to deploy HSPA+.

#25
GBT11:26 am, 17 Jun 11

magiccar9 said :

Gungahlin Al said :

Chop71 said :

What do they charge to sign up?

Zip. Free Network Termination Unit (read: modem/router), fibre to the wall of the home, but you’ll need an ISP account of course.

Yes, but from what I’ve heard there is going to be a limited amount of service providers. Little competition means highly inflated prices. Back we go to being a nation known for our poor technology uptake. For my 2 cents worth, the government should have been investing their ~40B in wireless technology.
Reports are coming out every day telling us that we are moving to a smartphone/tablet computing era, smartphones sales are skyrocketing – yet the government still thinks we need “high speed” land line connections! The US is moving past 4G technology while we are still trying to grasp 3G. Come on! HA!

You do realise wireless spectrum is limited, don’t you? The more people using it, the slower the speeds will be.

Fibre is actually capable of up to 1 GB which is much more than is required now and isn’t affected by the amount of users. What is the point of spending around half the cost of the NBN on infrastructure that will just cost a lot to be updated in a few years when it is already falling behind?

Something Tony Abbott doesn’t seem to realise (seeing as he knows nothing about his own policy)

#26
thatsnotme11:39 am, 17 Jun 11

Mysteryman said :

I’d rather they had nothing to do with Telstra at all, to be honest. In my mind, Telstra are the reason Australia’s telecommunications infrastructure is lacking. They had the monopoly for a long time and did very little to better our broadband or mobile communications when they had the chance, even though they were still charging quite a lot for the basic services they were providing. They placed RIMs in many new suburbs around Canberra, consequently limiting the broadband speeds to that of obsolete technology. Then they decided they didn’t want to be part of the broadband rollout because it didn’t suit them. Then they wanted back in.

I’d have preferred they were left behind and we moved on without them.

We are.

The fact of the matter is though, that Telstra own a huge amount of infrastructure that is currently housing copper, that can easily have fibre run through it. By purchasing that infrastructure, it means that we don’t have to dig new pits and trenches next to the ones that are already there – for a massive amount more money than it will cost to buy Telstra’s existing infrastructure. Replicating that infrastructure will take a lot longer as well.

#27
Chop7111:42 am, 17 Jun 11

So if it is free why does places like Armidale and Tas have very small sign up figures? ie 9 ppl out of a whole town/city. Seems strange that a $40 Billion project with very few people taking advantage of it.

Also did they mention time frames for completion to areas like Woden, Belconnen and Civic

#28
thatsnotme11:53 am, 17 Jun 11

Chop71 said :

So if it is free why does places like Armidale and Tas have very small sign up figures? ie 9 ppl out of a whole town/city. Seems strange that a $40 Billion project with very few people taking advantage of it.

Also did they mention time frames for completion to areas like Woden, Belconnen and Civic

Partly because getting fibre connected to the home is on an ‘opt in’ basis, rather than ‘opt out’. So people actually had to be proactive to get connected.

I would think that those figures are likely people actively connected to the NBN via a service provider, and not people ‘NBN Ready’ – ie, with fibre connected, but inactive.

Or maybe they’re just readers of ‘The Australian’, who seemingly have a daily quota on negative stories about the NBN.

#29
welkin3112:45 pm, 17 Jun 11

A report on what is happening right now in the Wollongong area as the NBN rolls out. $140 per month does not jump out at me as being attractive.
Join the NBN or you’ll be digging deep

EXCLUSIVE by Geoff Chambers
From: The Daily Telegraph
June 17, 2011
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/sydney-nsw/join-the-nbn-or-youll-be-digging-deep/story-e6freuzi-1226076678641

#30
Gungahlin Al1:46 pm, 17 Jun 11

welkin31 said :

A report on what is happening right now in the Wollongong area as the NBN rolls out. $140 per month does not jump out at me as being attractive.
Join the NBN or you’ll be digging deep

EXCLUSIVE by Geoff Chambers
From: The Daily Telegraph
June 17, 2011
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/sydney-nsw/join-the-nbn-or-youll-be-digging-deep/story-e6freuzi-1226076678641

What a ridiculous article.

They are there in massive numbers – other night they said in Armidale they had 170 staff working – and they say connect now and it costs you a big fat $zero.

But you say “Nah thanks – Tony told me it’s only about pirating movies and I don’t need it.”

Then after they’ve all left you have a change of mind. Let’s say you decided to sell your house and the agent tells you that your place ain’t so attractive because it only has 1500Kb ADSL. And you expect they should just load up the truck and come back to do your place – for free??

There is one journalist in serious need of a reality check donation.

I’m just saying is all…

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