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NBN rollout. To 2014 we wait (unless we live in Gungahlin)

By 29 March 2012 48

fibre optics

Labor MLA Chris Bourke has tweeted the planned NBN rollout.

Coming up in Canberra is Belconnen, Crace, Civic, Deakin, Kambah, Manuka, Monash and Scullin.

Julia Gillard has announced she intends 135,000 homes, businesses, schools and hospitals to be connected in Canberra by mid 2014.

NBNco has an interactive map.

It appears outside of Gungahlin and Mitchell we’re all going to be waiting until [after] 2014.

UPDATE 29/03/12 15:44: Chief Minister Gallagher has expressed her joy at not being left out.

[Photo by rpongsaj CC BY 2.0]

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48 Responses to NBN rollout. To 2014 we wait (unless we live in Gungahlin)
#31
rosscoact9:00 pm, 29 Mar 12

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

#32
I-filed9:13 pm, 29 Mar 12

rosscoact said :

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

How do you spell nah nah nah nah nah nah, Gungahlinite? Here’s how I spell it:

“Takes me 7 minutes to drive to work at Parliament House from the inner north!”

#33
Bramina11:17 pm, 29 Mar 12

I-filed said :

“Work commenced refers to the date that NBN Co has completed the Network Design Document for a locality and signals the beginning of our engagement with your local community an…. “

I think we can add another few years on.

What do they need to consult with the community about anyway? Laying the cables is an engineering problem.

#34
tommy11:30 pm, 29 Mar 12

I recently attended a Canberra Business Council lunch at the press club (kindly paid for by one of my contacts who needed to make up numbers on a table). Michael Malone from iinet was there to gloat and reassure Canberra how wonderful it was that iinet owned Transact.

Anyway, one of the concerning points he made about the NBN (all points he made were glowing) was that areas of Canberra serviced by Transact fibre cable were going to be considered by the government as “serviced adequately by the NBN”. Argh. The Transact plans are awful – and awfully expensive…

#35
caf12:29 am, 30 Mar 12

johnboy said :

the problem isn’t the engineering, it’s taking what’s supposed to be interconnected networks and having on great big one prone to a single point of failure.

There isn’t one single point of failure. The name “National Broadband Network” certainly conjures up an image of one giant network, but that’s misleading. The actual architecture is that the NBN provides “last mile” connectivity from the customer to the exchange, where the competing ISPs take over.

#36
johnboy12:41 am, 30 Mar 12

but the physical network is a monolithic architecture.

#37
spinact1:01 am, 30 Mar 12

I-filed said :

rosscoact said :

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

How do you spell nah nah nah nah nah nah, Gungahlinite? Here’s how I spell it:

“Takes me 7 minutes to drive to work at Parliament House from the inner north!”

Bahahahah, thanks, this thread was getting way to serious and informative

#38
rosscoact9:35 am, 30 Mar 12

I-filed said :

rosscoact said :

how does one spell nah nah nah nah nah na?

already under construction, sweet

How do you spell nah nah nah nah nah nah, Gungahlinite? Here’s how I spell it:

“Takes me 7 minutes to drive to work at Parliament House from the inner north!”

Ha ha, wage slave, I work from home

#39
Deref9:58 am, 30 Mar 12

johnboy said :

At the moment it will take legislation to implement filtering. Once the government owns the network it can happen with a nod and a wink.

Though you’re absolutely right about Australia’s appalling attitude to censorship, you’re confusing the pipes with the flow.

The NBN won’t be mandatory – you’ll still be able to connect through other network providers, including satellite, providing that they maintain a physical infrastructure (which is questionable). But that’s irrelevant – owning the fibre doesn’t give the gubmint any more ability to censor the Internet than it already has. Censorship’s done at the ISP level, not the physical (i.e. fibre) level.

#40
johnboy10:02 am, 30 Mar 12

I’ll bet you london to a brick that signing up to the filter scheme will be made so attractive that no ISP will choose to opt out. And with the copper network torn up and the high speed fibre there the alternatives will be very unattractive.

And if you think this will be by coincidence I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

#41
Deref10:16 am, 30 Mar 12

johnboy said :

I’ll bet you london to a brick that signing up to the filter scheme will be made so attractive that no ISP will choose to opt out. And with the copper network torn up and the high speed fibre there the alternatives will be very unattractive.

And if you think this will be by coincidence I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

If they’re going to censor us, they won’t need to make it attractive to ISPs – they’ll make it mandatory.

And, as I said, how you connect is irrelevant; once ISPs are required to “filter” content, it doesn’t matter whether you connect via the NBN, tin cans and string, telepathy or carrier pigeon – you’re still going to get censored.

Do not, under any circumstances, take this as support for it.

#42
Dilandach10:55 am, 30 Mar 12

Deref said :

johnboy said :

I’ll bet you london to a brick that signing up to the filter scheme will be made so attractive that no ISP will choose to opt out. And with the copper network torn up and the high speed fibre there the alternatives will be very unattractive.

And if you think this will be by coincidence I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

If they’re going to censor us, they won’t need to make it attractive to ISPs – they’ll make it mandatory.

And, as I said, how you connect is irrelevant; once ISPs are required to “filter” content, it doesn’t matter whether you connect via the NBN, tin cans and string, telepathy or carrier pigeon – you’re still going to get censored.

Do not, under any circumstances, take this as support for it.

Which is why I said things were an impossible choice.

Labor – Good for NBN, Bad for censorship.
Coalition – Bad for NBN, good for censorship (so they say)

Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

#43
CitizenK10:56 am, 30 Mar 12

Whatup guys

The majority of Canberra starting within 3 years. This is a big win locally.

The whole roll out is TEN YEARS. aren’t we lucky to get a start (and probably completion) before the full roll out is half over.

BTW – love reading all the ignorance around the technology. I am no expert, but some stuff in this thread is hilarious. (espec the association with asbestos and an outdated speed of light)

#44
Dilandach11:14 am, 30 Mar 12

CitizenK said :

BTW – love reading all the ignorance around the technology. I am no expert, but some stuff in this thread is hilarious. (espec the association with asbestos and an outdated speed of light)

It’s incredibly irritating and disheartening.

But if people want to turn to Alan Jones for their technical opinions, they get what they deserve.

#45
Thoroughly Smashed12:21 pm, 30 Mar 12

tommy said :

Anyway, one of the concerning points he made about the NBN (all points he made were glowing) was that areas of Canberra serviced by Transact fibre cable were going to be considered by the government as “serviced adequately by the NBN”. Argh. The Transact plans are awful – and awfully expensive…

TransACT cabled areas can only be considered “serviced adequately by the NBN” if NBNCo takes ownership of the TransACT network. It’s not NBN otherwise.

#46
Thoroughly Smashed12:24 pm, 30 Mar 12

Thoroughly Smashed said :

TransACT cabled areas can only be considered “serviced adequately by the NBN” if NBNCo takes ownership of the TransACT network. It’s not NBN otherwise.

And then, the parts of that particular network that aren’t up to “NBN spec” would need replacing anyway.

I wouldn’t be too worried about it.

#47
dpm1:40 pm, 30 Mar 12

tommy said :

I recently attended a Canberra Business Council lunch at the press club (kindly paid for by one of my contacts who needed to make up numbers on a table). Michael Malone from iinet was there to gloat and reassure Canberra how wonderful it was that iinet owned Transact.

Anyway, one of the concerning points he made about the NBN (all points he made were glowing) was that areas of Canberra serviced by Transact fibre cable were going to be considered by the government as “serviced adequately by the NBN”. Argh. The Transact plans are awful – and awfully expensive…

This is what I was getting at with my earlier queries. Surely they must have (had) some reason to buy what is effectively a lemon? Though, it looks like we are well past the point of them selling it to NBN so I really don’t know how they are going to get much business out of it? It just seems a bit odd to me. Sorry, i’m stupid….

#48
Gungahlin Al11:45 pm, 30 Mar 12

People are jumping to worst-case conclusions here. NBN execs have attended multiple meetings with Gungahlin Community Council and they have repeatedly pointed out that it makes no financial sense to establish the local installation team, start the work and do part of Canberra then pack up and go, only to come back again and restart later.

They told us that once they start in Gungahlin, they will continue until all of Gungahlin is done and then continue unabated until Canberra is finished. The “Starting within 3 years” means starting somewhere between 1 and 3 years. And they have also said to us multiple times that once they start an area, it will generally be completed within one year.

So while it is great for Gungahlin to be a Stage 2 release site, it is great for all of Canberra that the Gungahlin community’s campaign for better broadband paid off, because all of Canberra will be up and running before so many other parts of the country as a result.

Meanwhile I see that approximately half of the sites to be done under the 3-year rollout are in Coalition electorates. I bet there are very few Coalition MPs out there today telling their constituents that they reckon there electorate should be taken OFF the list!

And as I type this, there’s a news story on TV of Tweed-jacketed rural mayors complaining that their towns are not on the list… Yep – Abbott and Turnbull are on a real winner with their opposition to this one…

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