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OK for early teen girls to be drunk in clubs at 2am as long as they’re with an older man!

By johnboy - 29 July 2009 62

[First filed: July 28, 2009 @ 11:37]


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The Canberra Times brings the amazing news that the ACT Civil and Administrative Tribunal has dramatically expanded the possible scope of operations for Canberra’s night clubs.

Late in May we all thrilled to the outrage of a 13 year old girl found drunk and unconscious in Bar 32 at 2am by the police.

But the ACAT has found that because a 21 year old bloke offered to take her home she was in the care of a responsible adult and thus there was no breach.

    After an application by barrister Shane Gill for the venue, Tribunal President Linda Crebbin conceded licensing authorities had failed to prove the girl was not in the care of a responsible adult.

    ”We will, very reluctantly, given the extraordinary circumstances where a 13-year-old girl was on these premises at that time of the night, accept Mr Gill’s submission and the application is dismissed,” Ms Crebbin said.

Civic’s going to get even more exciting once the repercussions of this one shake out.

And sucks to be a teenage boy!

What’s Your opinion?


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62 Responses to
OK for early teen girls to be drunk in clubs at 2am as long as they’re with an older man!
1
AG Canberra 11:43 am
28 Jul 09
#

So no actual law was broken with a 13 year old being passed out inside a licenced premises (adult or no adult being present)….I reckon we might need to amend our laws.

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2
Nosey 11:55 am
28 Jul 09
#

I look forward to taking my three kids to get shit faced in town while I soberly watch.

I will have to break some sort of law to get them the grog they will require but from this precedent, I will get off.

Sweet times.

Ms Crebbin is retarded.

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3
Creekgirl 12:04 pm
28 Jul 09
#

What sort of person thinks that a 21 year old man who says he says he knows the 13 year old drunk girl is a “responsible adult”. I would not consider allowing her to get so drunk that she passes out responsible.

Also, how did the officers know that the 21 year old was telling the truth? Does someone have more details about this. He could have just seen an opportunity for rape. Just because he know her name doesn’t mean he had altruistic intentions.

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4
FC 12:17 pm
28 Jul 09
#

This raises some interesting points. what counts as a ‘responsible adult.’ Some of these laws are odd and can be open for interpretation. I remember being at the supermarket and purchasing some items with a younger neighbour. I bought a bottle of vodka (along with many other food items) and the man asked for my ID. I showed him my ID. All pretty standard. He then asked for my neighbours ID. I queried “His school ID? He’s not 18” and the man said he needed us both to be able to provide ID for him to be able to sell me the liquer. I found this quite odd, as, if I was with a 10 year old, then this request is not made. My neighbour had also been with his father many a time when he had purchased a case of beer from this same supermarket. So becuase I appeared to be still “youngish” somehow I am automatically suspicious or not classed as a ‘responsible adult’ although clearly the state, in allowing me to purchase the grog in the first place, regards me as one.
I ended up leaving with the alchohol – but only because I debated with the clerk, and then the manager, and was in no mood to be stuffed around (I believe I was running late).
Another time I drove my sister in law to the store to buy a case of beer, and after a short while I realised she might have difficulty carrying the case (she is very petite) I left the car and went to the store to carry it for her. The clerk then asked me for ID as I went to pick up the case for her. My ID was in the car, she had already paid for the beer, so I ignored his request but it seems as though these licencing laws can be interpreted many ways.
In ways that restrict, and ways that allow.

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5
Clown Killer 12:18 pm
28 Jul 09
#

So the Office of Regulatory Services failed to prove the venue had committed a breach of its licence and the complaint was dismissed after the commissioner’s office failed to prove its case despite being given a second chance to cross-examine witnesses – and that makes Ms Crebbin a retard? Yeah right.

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6
johnboy 12:20 pm
28 Jul 09
#

I do being to wonder if the ACT Government doesn’t need to start paying for better lawyers.

We never seem to win when it’s contested.

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7
Mr Evil 12:40 pm
28 Jul 09
#

Well, lucky she had a responsible adult with her, as it could have been worse – she could have woken up sandwiched between two sweaty, grunting older males in a toilet cubicle!

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8
j from the block 12:41 pm
28 Jul 09
#

Drawing a pretty long bow if you ask me.
Kids running around in a family friendly pub on an afternoon eg before 6 whilst there parents are still in a decent amount of sobriety, ok, in my opinion.
Only way I think this could be argued rationally (admitting its already done) was that the 21 year old was a family friend / well known in a plutonic way to the girl trying to remove her from the club.
“Oh no, there’s my best mates younger sister, I better take her home so she is safe”.
Under 18’s should not be out in clubs in civic.
As a bartender, its just far too hard to police, and far to risky for the venue, although, seems not in this case.

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9
j from the block 12:46 pm
28 Jul 09
#

Mr Evil said :

Well, lucky she had a responsible adult with her, as it could have been worse – she could have woken up sandwiched between two sweaty, grunting older males in a toilet cubicle!

my two kids approaching 18 are one of the reasons I got back into bars, to hopefully avoid them landing in those situations.

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10
ant 12:47 pm
28 Jul 09
#

What was a 13 year old girl doing out at that time of night? Does she have parents? The 21 year old male might well have been doing the right thing, but who is raising these kids?

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11
johnboy 12:49 pm
28 Jul 09
#

ant said :

What was a 13 year old girl doing out at that time of night? Does she have parents? The 21 year old male might well have been doing the right thing, but who is raising these kids?

Did you read the article ant?

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12
j from the block 12:52 pm
28 Jul 09
#

There is large number of clearly underage kids who roam around on Friday and Saturday nights in Civic. Some try to get into clubs before security gets on the door and stay inside, getting others to buy their drinks, some get all dressed up, and can definitely pass for 18, and walk around looking for a door man or woman who will assume rather than check ID.

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13
Inappropriate 12:52 pm
28 Jul 09
#

So the advice for teens is: make sure somebody knows your name is can make up a credible story.

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14
j from the block 12:56 pm
28 Jul 09
#

johnboy said :

ant said :

What was a 13 year old girl doing out at that time of night? Does she have parents? The 21 year old male might well have been doing the right thing, but who is raising these kids?

Did you read the article ant?

As much as sometimes some parents of teenagers wish it, you still can’t lock them up. Something about laws, human rights, basements in Austria………

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15
Thumper 12:56 pm
28 Jul 09
#

I bought a bottle of vodka (along with many other food items) and the man asked for my ID. I showed him my ID. All pretty standard. He then asked for my neighbours ID. I queried “His school ID? He’s not 18? and the man said he needed us both to be able to provide ID for him to be able to sell me the liquer

Happened to me with a bottle of scotch and my 16 year old son in tow once. I just stared increduously at the 14-15 year old said, ‘You are kiddng right? Manager. Now.’

Clearly she didn’t understand me. So I remained in the line and said it again, louder, so that the people lining up behind me could hear what the hold up was.

End of story, manager came in, gave me some rubbish spiel about something to which I simply said. ‘He’s my son, not yours. Your superior please.’ He got very flustered, especially when I offered him my phone to call his superior and finally allowed me to buy my scotch, but, ‘only this time’.

Wankers.

But yes, a seemingly simply black and white law can obviously be misinterpreted by some.

And as Mr Evil pointed out, the outcome could have been so very much different.

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