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P&C nixes school uniforms – will Katy move without them?

By 5 April 2006 37

In February we had an excited discussion on the subject of compulsory school uniforms following the issue being put out to consultation.

Yesterday the ABC reported that the P&C association has nixed the idea.

This raises three question.

1) Given that no issue ever went out for community consultation without the minister being already on board will Katy Gallagher push on without them.

2) Is the P&C still representative? Or has it suffered the curse of community organisations and been stacked with earnest lefties?

3) Do we actually want our young men to stop dressing like idiots and the young women like whores? Or would we prefer the continuing entertainment?

UPDATED: The Canberra Times take on the issue is oushing this as a “leave it to the schools” line. Which is fine except it represents the status quo.

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37 Responses to
P&C nixes school uniforms – will Katy move without them?
che 10:29 am
05 Apr 06
#1

lots of scratchy wool, thats what they need to be wearing
good for them, good for the country

Swaggie 10:59 am
05 Apr 06
#2

Dunno that they’ve nixed it JB – just left it to each school to decide for themselves and if Katy goes ahead she’ll be getting total support from 80% of the parents at our kid’s school, The remaining 20% of parents are feral anyway and take no interest in what their kids do at school anyway.

Swaggie 11:03 am
05 Apr 06
#3

Hmmm got carried away with my ‘anyways’ above – delete any one as you see fit…

Sssanta 12:33 pm
05 Apr 06
#4

Agreed. really is an issue that is best dealth with on a school to school basis. that way the P&C still have a bit of tug, and can really have a say as to what affects their very local community.

Thumper 12:41 pm
05 Apr 06
#5

Put them in bloody uniforms. That way they don’t look like scum of the earth, the parents save money because they only need two sets of unforms all year, and everyone knows where the students come from.

bonfire 1:06 pm
05 Apr 06
#6

they already dress like their pop idols in either hip or hop attire.

justbands 1:28 pm
05 Apr 06
#7

“the parents save money because they only need two sets of unforms all year”

Always the arugment for uniforms….always completely wrong. Those kids stay in uniform after school when they hang out with their friends do they? No, of course not. They put on the trendiest garb they have at their disposal as soon as they walk in the door. All uniforms do in this case is create more washing!

& two sets of uniforms? I know my 8yo needs a LOT more than that to get through the year.

Thumper 2:00 pm
05 Apr 06
#8

Justbands,

and the way it is today? They were clothes to school, come home, throw them on the floor, get changed into another set…

schmerica 7:47 pm
05 Apr 06
#9

Put them in uniforms. Im sick of seeing 16 year old females’ ass cracks and the boxers of males who insist on wearing their pants around their ankles.

nyssa76 8:21 am
06 Apr 06
#10

Now working in a school where the uniform is compulsory, I say bring it in.

Kids can still be individuals.

After working at schools without even a “dress code”, I am sick of seeing muffin tops, g-strings riding up, boxers over the top of pants, sleeveless shirts and low cleavage t-shirts.

Uniforms can be cheap and be made at home with a pattern and material for less than actually buying a new one.

Don’t use the argument that parents can’t afford it. That’s what the student equity budget is for.

Chalker 9:23 am
06 Apr 06
#11

Curious anecdote that was revealed to me the other week (I haven’t checked its validity): Low-rider or hipster jeans have the effect on guys of pinching certain nerve clusters that lead into the groin region, resulting in erectile disfunction.

vg 9:59 am
06 Apr 06
#12

Lookout Nyssa, I agree with you

LurkerGal 10:27 am
06 Apr 06
#13

Me too. Less midriffs and boxer shorts and more looking like they are ready to have an education. And anyone can afford blue tracksuit pants and a white top. It’s cheaper than designer jeans.

Absent Diane 11:17 am
06 Apr 06
#14

school uniforms encourage conformity… in my view that is a bad thing….

Mr_Shab 11:49 am
06 Apr 06
#15

Oh ferchrissakes AD – the kiddies won’t turn into zombies or (gasp!) Liberal voters cause they have to wear the same damn t-shirt.

And you seem to assume conformity is always a bad thing. You strike me as a bit of a socialist at heard. You should be the first to admit that sometimes you’ve gotta conform for the greater good ;)

Mr_Shab 11:50 am
06 Apr 06
#16

sorry, socialist at heart.

ghughes 12:55 pm
06 Apr 06
#17

Nyssa
I too am sick of seeing muffin tops, g-strings riding up, boxers over the top of pants, sleeveless shirts and low cleavage t-shirts on teachers.

Bring in a dress code for teachers – and then get the students in uniform.

Absent Diane 1:56 pm
06 Apr 06
#18

Mr Shab – I just remember hating being told what to wear and I was never one of those fashion concious kids either- just destested having that choice of what to wear taken away from me… I still hate being told what to do what to wear how to act – so I can be a bit of a handful to employ at times but I counter that with the brilliance……

Mr_Shab 3:40 pm
06 Apr 06
#19

Boo-hoo! I’m being oppressed!

Sorry AD, but you are your employer’s bitch. Especially post-”Work Choices”.

No, I wasn’t crazy about the uniform I wore at school, but I think the arguements for the benefits of uniforms are more compelling than petulant whining about supression of individuality.

RandomGit 4:00 pm
06 Apr 06
#20

We didn’t get a choice in Coffs Harbour, uniforms from kindy right through to year 12, hence we never knew we were missing anything.

Much ado about nothing.

Absent Diane 4:01 pm
06 Apr 06
#21

but whinging is so much fun!!!

nyssa76 7:00 am
07 Apr 06
#22

ghughes, teachers, whether in the Non-Govt or Govt system have a dress code.

Chalker 10:40 am
07 Apr 06
#23

You might want to tell some of the ones I’ve worked with that.

GnT 12:57 pm
07 Apr 06
#24

Nyssa – when was the last time you turned on your sewing machine?

Sewing clothes is no longer cheaper than buying them in most cases. I agree with LG – tracksuit pants and polo shirts are a pratical and cheap uniform.

And uniforms for teachers? Bring it on!!

GnT 12:59 pm
07 Apr 06
#25

BTW Chalker, at my school we’ve just had a compulsory PD to inform staff of the department’s brand new dress code policy, so there should be no confusion among teachers anymore.

schmerica 3:47 pm
07 Apr 06
#26

ghughes I’m not exactly sure what schools your seeing but I just spent my last two weeks on Prac in a Primary school and I didnt see one of those things.

Children can still be individuals, even though they are dressed the same. Being an individual goes more than the way they dress, its their personalities and attitudes which really decided stuff like that.

Uniforms are a good thing because the children who come from the poorer families arn’t made to feel inadequate because of the way they dress. I remember some of the people I went to school with, who couldnt afford brand names, turned to smoking and drinking because they were constantly made to feel on the ‘outside’ because they didnt have the latest $150 jeans or the $200 shoes. I’m not saying this is the case for all kids, I’m sure alot of children handle it fine. This is just what I have seen in my experience.

nyssa76 3:22 am
08 Apr 06
#27

GnT, I asked about it from the school clothing shop and the main disributor of school clothing in the ACT. The material is cheaper and seeing as most Non-Govt schools have identical dresses, there is plenty of material to go around.

The dresses at my school are over $65 each. Hand made, they are $35-$40.

Personally, I’d rather save $25.

Teachers don’t wear “uniforms” but they can and do wear shirts/jumpers/jackets with the school logo on it – which they pay for themselves. It’s been happening for years.

vg 9:45 am
08 Apr 06
#28

“which they pay for themselves”

and, like most occupations in a similiar position, claim on tax.

nyssa76 10:48 am
08 Apr 06
#29

Well duh.

However the point was that teachers buy them because they want to and do it because they feel a sense of pride in their school community. Jazz spoke of compulsory uniforms, so I responded.

Don’t try and twist my words vg.

vg 11:31 am
08 Apr 06
#30

I buy stuff for my own work all the time, in fact some of the items could be considered ‘uniform’. Teachers are not unique and special snowflakes. Everyone else has been doing it for years as well.

Its not twisting your words when I only repeat what you say. You keep trotting out the same line about people ‘twisting’ your words when you are cornered in a discussion. People are getting sick and tired of you pointing out what they consider ‘de riguer’ as something special, like family responsibilities, unpaid overtime and having to pay for some of the stuff you use at work.

Maybe your calling as an accident investigator could be a change of focus.

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