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Plastic shopping bags ban successful

By Canfan - 5 June 2014 40

The ACT’s plastic shopping bags ban has resulted in a 36% decrease in the amount of plastic bags sent to landfill and is now supported by 65% of Canberra grocery shoppers, a review into the ban has found.

Minister for the Environment and Sustainable Development, Simon Corbell, tabled a review of the first two years of the Plastic Shopping Bags Ban Act 2010 in the Legislative Assembly today.

“A review of the ban has justified the ACT government’s 2011 legislation banning the supply of single-use shopping bags made of polyethylene of 35 microns or less thickness,” Mr Corbell said.

A survey by Piazza Research in March 2014 of 602 people who were all the main grocery shopper in their household found 65% supported the ban, an increase of 7% over a similar survey held in September 2012, while those against the ban fell to 26% from 33%.

“Those supporting the ban said they did so for environmental reasons and agreed the ban has had a positive effect on the environment,” Mr Corbell said.

“Furthermore, 71% said they did not want the ban overturned and 68% said the ban should be implemented nationally.”

An analysis of shopping bag use by Canberra shoppers during six months from May to October 2013 has also shown significant benefits to the environment.

“Using information from major retailers in the territory, we estimated 171 tonnes of plastic bags were sent to landfill, a 36% decrease on the 266 tonnes sent to landfill in the six months prior to the ban.

“Another interesting finding is that while there was an initial increase in sales of bin liners immediately after the ban, sales have now fallen to pre-ban levels, which indicates people are reusing the thicker plastic bags for rubbish or other alternatives.

“The ACT is one of four states and territories to introduce a plastic shopping bag ban and is a prime example of how legislation can drive change and promote behavioural change by the community that improves the environment and reduces waste.”

The review is available at www.environment.act.gov.au

(Media Release Simon Corbell MLA)

What’s Your opinion?


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40 Responses to
Plastic shopping bags ban successful
1
Garfield 5:20 pm
05 Jun 14
#

Has Simon Corbell asked the super markets for information on their plastic rubbish bag sales from before and after the ban? Prior to the ban I used cloth bags most of the time and the few plastic shopping bags I brought home were used for rubbish.

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2
Maya123 5:56 pm
05 Jun 14
#

Garfield said :

Has Simon Corbell asked the super markets for information on their plastic rubbish bag sales from before and after the ban? Prior to the ban I used cloth bags most of the time and the few plastic shopping bags I brought home were used for rubbish.

Are you saying that you now buy plastic bags? Why have you changed your habits?
The ban made no difference to me. I didn’t bring plastic bags home before the ban, or buy plastic bags for the rubbish. Since the ban I still take my own bags shopping and don’t buy plastic bags for rubbish. I can find a waste plastic bag (toilet roll bag/ bread bag/ etc) for the one or two I use each two or three weeks.

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3
Pork Hunt 6:03 pm
05 Jun 14
#

I look forward to dolphins and sea turtles making a come back in LBG.

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4
davo101 6:11 pm
05 Jun 14
#

Garfield said :

Has Simon Corbell asked the super markets for information on their plastic rubbish bag sales from before and after the ban?

From the article:

Another interesting finding is that while there was an initial increase in sales of bin liners immediately after the ban, sales have now fallen to pre-ban levels

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5
bigfeet 6:25 pm
05 Jun 14
#

Wait..wait…let me grab a glass of wine…

OK..now I’m ready.

Let rip Mr G!

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6
Masquara 7:54 pm
05 Jun 14
#

What ban? I use three plastic bags at 10c each, every time I shop!

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7
Very Busy 8:03 pm
05 Jun 14
#

Any chance that we could have the wording of the questions that the 602 “main grocery shoppers” were asked? I am dubious. Not push polling by any chance was it?

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8
davo101 10:03 pm
05 Jun 14
#

bigfeet said :

Let rip Mr G!

Mr G’s thoughts are available via Twitter–if you dare.

Masquara said :

What ban?

Hilarious

Very Busy said :

Any chance that we could have the wording of the questions that the 602 “main grocery shoppers” were asked? I am dubious. Not push polling by any chance was it?

p.29 of the report.

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9
rommeldog56 10:13 pm
05 Jun 14
#

“The ACT’s plastic shopping bags ban has resulted in a 36% decrease in the amount of plastic bags sent to landfill and is now supported by 65% of Canberra grocery shoppers, a review into the ban has found.”

I wonder what scientifically based/proven method they used to calculate that ? Does the ACT Government have someone stationed at the tip to count the bags as they come in to go to landfill ???

“Furthermore, 71% said they did not want the ban overturned and 68% said the ban should be implemented nationally.”

Obviously, the 71% have not tried to do a weekly shop for a family of 4 or 5 people ! The number of reusable plastic bags you have to take in with u is absurd.

“Using information from major retailers in the territory, we estimated 171 tonnes of plastic bags were sent to landfill, a 36% decrease on the 266 tonnes sent to landfill in the six months prior to the ban.”

Well, how would the retailers know that ???? I can not possibly see how that sort of figure can be ascertained from retailers ?

Spin, spin, spin. Lies, lies and more dam lies from what is an inept ACT Government. Having said that, there is no doubt that the ban has benefited the environment – its just the dodgy figures and the spin that I intensely dislike. Buy hey, its the ACT Government – what more would one expect !

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10
rommeldog56 10:27 pm
05 Jun 14
#

Very Busy said :

Any chance that we could have the wording of the questions that the 602 “main grocery shoppers” were asked? I am dubious. Not push polling by any chance was it?

What, show the taxpayers – who funded the consultancy report – the contents, including the questions, extrapolations of stats, projections, etc ? You are surely joking, “Very Busy”. As taxpayers and those inconvenienced by the ban, we should just accept what the good Mr Corbell tells us without comment or query – and give thanks.

Nowdays, I deliberately get some meat from my local butcher so I can get one of those thicker, blue plastic bags, instead of buying my meat from Woollies/Coles. Not only is it better meat, but I take a perverse delight in filling it with rubbish and putting it in the green rubbish bin for kerbside collection !

I know, I know, its the rebel and non conformist in me I’m afraid. Still, I gotta help keep the kerbside rubbish collections going so I can get some value out of the potential tripling of my Annual Rates, the rapidly increasing ACT Government charges, my taxes being spent on the toy train set, etc.

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11
Pork Hunt 10:41 pm
05 Jun 14
#

One has to ask the question why none of the major supermarkets choose to give the bags away for free? As far as I know, the legislation does not state that the customer has to pay. Happy to be corrected on this.

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12
wildturkeycanoe 7:57 am
06 Jun 14
#

I get regular deliveries of plastic bags from my parents who live in N.S.W. They end up with too many and offload to us for bin liners in the toilet and many other things like – for kids to put their wet clothes in after a day at the swimming carnival, to place trout in before sticking in the esky and getting fish slime all over the beers, double wrapping prawn shells before putting in the kitchen tidy, spew bags for the back seat passengers in the car on long road trips….I could go on. Viva le-landfill!

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13
Maya123 8:52 am
06 Jun 14
#

rommeldog56 said :

“Obviously, the 71% have not tried to do a weekly shop for a family of 4 or 5 people !

The number of reusable plastic bags you have to take in with u is absurd.

Use cloth bags. They last for years. They are stronger too, so that they will hold more and you don’t need as many; possible third to half as many bags. But really, is it that much of a burden to gather up the bags before you go to the shops! It’s a lot less to carry the bags to the shops than what you will be carrying home.

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14
m_ratt 8:57 am
06 Jun 14
#

Pork Hunt said :

One has to ask the question why none of the major supermarkets choose to give the bags away for free? As far as I know, the legislation does not state that the customer has to pay. Happy to be corrected on this.

Nothing requiring them to pay, other than economics. The reusable bags are much sturdier, and obviously much more expensive to manufacture, distribute, etc. Providing them free of charge, in unlimited quantities would be a significant cost impost on the retailers, and additionally remove any incentive for reuse.

I’d be interested in the figures on soft plastic contamination in recycling collection as the sturdier bags are more widely used, and often mistakenly used to bundle recyclables into bins (you could find an example in every single recycling bin in my apartment complex, every week).

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15
KB1971 9:36 am
06 Jun 14
#

Maya123 said :

rommeldog56 said :

“Obviously, the 71% have not tried to do a weekly shop for a family of 4 or 5 people !

The number of reusable plastic bags you have to take in with u is absurd.

Use cloth bags. They last for years. They are stronger too, so that they will hold more and you don’t need as many; possible third to half as many bags. But really, is it that much of a burden to gather up the bags before you go to the shops! It’s a lot less to carry the bags to the shops than what you will be carrying home.

Apparently it is but you cant let common sense get in the way of a big whinge!

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