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Police seek assistance to house vandalism

By 9 July 2014 24

ACT Policing is seeking assistance to an incident of property damage which occurred in Kambah last night (Tuesday, July 8).

About 9.05pm police were called to a report of numerous people at a home in Shaw Place, causing damage to the premises. Upon arrival police saw numerous cars in the street and up to 70 teenagers leaving the location.

Attending police established that a ‘free house’ party had been advertised on Facebook letting members of the public know that a party was going to be held there.

Examination of the premises revealed approximately $100,000 worth of damage to the property with most windows broken, doors pulled off, walls kicked in, light fittings smashed and property in the back yard damaged.

Acting Officer-in-Charge of Tuggeranong Station, Sergeant Mark Rowswell, said this incident is a wanton display of senseless vandalism.

“This is a senseless act with little regard to the home owners. At this time we have a number of vehicle registrations of fleeing cars which we will be following up on,” said Sergeant Rowswell.

“For any teens that were involved, I urge you to come forward and talk to us. We believe those involved are aged between 15 to 18-years- old. It would be better for them to come forward than wait for police to come knock on their door.”

Police are appealing for anyone who may have witnessed the incident, been in the area of Shaw Place at the time, or have any information to assist the investigation to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000, or via www.act.crimestoppers.com.au. Information can be provided anonymously.

(ACT Policing Media Release)

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24 Responses to Police seek assistance to house vandalism
#1
mountainman1:35 pm, 09 Jul 14
#2
Postalgeek2:58 pm, 09 Jul 14

$1500 bucks from each kid, and if the ones caught don’t enlighten the police, stack it on the ones caught.

Sounds like they have cars that can go towards the repair bill.

#3
magiccar97:42 pm, 09 Jul 14

Social media at its best!

Rather than making the kids pay (let’s face it, it’ll only be the degenerate parents who fork the money for the precious child) hit the kids where it hurts. Take away cars, access to internet/phones. We need to get creative in punishing this generation of snotty nosed kids who just don’t give a sh*t anymore.

#4
Masquara8:55 pm, 09 Jul 14

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

#5
bigred9:04 pm, 09 Jul 14

Very defensively written release. So police were called at 9.05 pm. what time did they actually arrive?

#6
Maya12310:23 am, 10 Jul 14

Masquara said :

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

It looked a bit like that in the photographs, and no wall insulation in view either, but they might have been internal walls photographed. Poor home owners. The teenagers if caught should be made to pay for the damage, but I doubt they will get the punishment they deserve. Immature brats!

#7
davo10110:53 am, 10 Jul 14

Masquara said :

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

Short answer: yes.

#8
John Moulis11:17 am, 10 Jul 14

This isn’t a new phenomenon confined to Facebook or the Internet era. When I was at the CCAE (Uni of Canberra) in 1988 there was a proposal to hold a B&S Ball at a function centre on the road to the West Belco sewerage works. I was on the committee at the time and I argued against the proposal saying it could get out of control and we could be up for thousands of dollars in damages. An election was held with the right wing party promising that the ball would go ahead. I lost my seat along with others who voted against the proposal. The ball went ahead and yes, it did get out of control and the venue was trashed. The student newspaper called it “the biggest financial disaster in the history of the CCAE Students Association”. The venue closed down completely and never rebuilt, and the Students Association was still paying the bills 20 years later.

#9
thy_dungeonman1:37 pm, 10 Jul 14

In the report on ABC news the neighbor who were interviewed said they heard music and smashing of windows etc. This raises the question how immediately did they call the police? and how immediately did the police respond, they seem to have caused quite a large amount of damage in a short time. How did the police not arrest a single person at least for questioning, if there seventy people fleeing and cars in the street?

#10
Tooks3:22 pm, 10 Jul 14

thy_dungeonman said :

In the report on ABC news the neighbor who were interviewed said they heard music and smashing of windows etc. This raises the question how immediately did they call the police? and how immediately did the police respond, they seem to have caused quite a large amount of damage in a short time. How did the police not arrest a single person at least for questioning, if there seventy people fleeing and cars in the street?

Just because they didn’t mention they caught anyone, doesn’t mean they didn’t. Think about it.

#11
Tooks3:25 pm, 10 Jul 14

bigred said :

Very defensively written release. So police were called at 9.05 pm. what time did they actually arrive?

They gave them just enough time to escape just so they could avoid work.

#12
dungfungus4:00 pm, 10 Jul 14

davo101 said :

Masquara said :

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

Short answer: yes.

The empty bourbon case was made of cardboard and it has a barcode which can tell exactly where and when it was bought. That data can then be matched with recorded CCTV at the shop and an image of the purchaser is availble.

#13
Pork Hunt5:43 pm, 10 Jul 14

dungfungus said :

davo101 said :

Masquara said :

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

Short answer: yes.

The empty bourbon case was made of cardboard and it has a barcode which can tell exactly where and when it was bought. That data can then be matched with recorded CCTV at the shop and an image of the purchaser is availble.

Surely the whole point of having a barcode is that they are ALL THE SAME?

#14
dungfungus6:49 pm, 10 Jul 14

Pork Hunt said :

dungfungus said :

davo101 said :

Masquara said :

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

Short answer: yes.

The empty bourbon case was made of cardboard and it has a barcode which can tell exactly where and when it was bought. That data can then be matched with recorded CCTV at the shop and an image of the purchaser is availble.

Surely the whole point of having a barcode is that they are ALL THE SAME?

Do you have one of those “Every Day Reward Card thingees”?
Every time you buy something the information on the barcode is harvested to creat a profile of you so that other products can be sublty marketed to you.
For example, everyone is selling car insurance these days (including supermarkets) so if your file shows that you buy a slab of VB ever day they are not going to offer you anything like car insurance.
Every barcode scanned gives a lot of information – they are not the same.

#15
Funky16:59 pm, 10 Jul 14

If you actually look closely at the photos, yes they are all internal walls. Hence no insulation or real resistance to a well aimed boot.

And yes, all cardboard boxes have a standard product barcode, not individual tracking codes.

The way to track some of these vandals would be to get cache copies of the Facebook post and see who commented or liked the original post.

#16
Pork Hunt9:18 pm, 10 Jul 14

dungfungus said :

Pork Hunt said :

dungfungus said :

davo101 said :

Masquara said :

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

Short answer: yes.

The empty bourbon case was made of cardboard and it has a barcode which can tell exactly where and when it was bought. That data can then be matched with recorded CCTV at the shop and an image of the purchaser is availble.

Surely the whole point of having a barcode is that they are ALL THE SAME?

Do you have one of those “Every Day Reward Card thingees”?
Every time you buy something the information on the barcode is harvested to creat a profile of you so that other products can be sublty marketed to you.
For example, everyone is selling car insurance these days (including supermarkets) so if your file shows that you buy a slab of VB ever day they are not going to offer you anything like car insurance.
Every barcode scanned gives a lot of information – they are not the same.

Surely, Dungers, the card is linked to the individual who presents it at the checkout. The poor old slab of VB is an inaminate object and there are thousands out there waiting to be purchased and drunk regardless of whether the card holder has insurance or not. They all have the same barcode.
I don’t have an everyday thingy rewards card but I am 100% confident that every time I pay with a bank card someone somewhere eventually gets my data. They can use it for good or evil, I have no say in that.

#17
bigred9:35 pm, 10 Jul 14

Tooks said :

bigred said :

Very defensively written release. So police were called at 9.05 pm. what time did they actually arrive?

They gave them just enough time to escape just so they could avoid work.

Well, what time did they arrive?

#18
dungfungus10:02 am, 11 Jul 14

Pork Hunt said :

dungfungus said :

Pork Hunt said :

dungfungus said :

davo101 said :

Masquara said :

What’s the house made of? Cardboard?

Short answer: yes.

The empty bourbon case was made of cardboard and it has a barcode which can tell exactly where and when it was bought. That data can then be matched with recorded CCTV at the shop and an image of the purchaser is availble.

Surely the whole point of having a barcode is that they are ALL THE SAME?

Do you have one of those “Every Day Reward Card thingees”?
Every time you buy something the information on the barcode is harvested to creat a profile of you so that other products can be sublty marketed to you.
For example, everyone is selling car insurance these days (including supermarkets) so if your file shows that you buy a slab of VB ever day they are not going to offer you anything like car insurance.
Every barcode scanned gives a lot of information – they are not the same.

Surely, Dungers, the card is linked to the individual who presents it at the checkout. The poor old slab of VB is an inaminate object and there are thousands out there waiting to be purchased and drunk regardless of whether the card holder has insurance or not. They all have the same barcode.
I don’t have an everyday thingy rewards card but I am 100% confident that every time I pay with a bank card someone somewhere eventually gets my data. They can use it for good or evil, I have no say in that.

In this case the carton was bourbon and cola and it would have purchased on the way to the party so it would be a simple matter of checking grog shops in the vicinity in the hours before the party started.

#19
Ghettosmurf8712:18 pm, 11 Jul 14

dungfungus said :

In this case the carton was bourbon and cola and it would have purchased on the way to the party so it would be a simple matter of checking grog shops in the vicinity in the hours before the party started.

It’s probably not quite that simple, though I see your point. As pointed out earlier, the barcode is not unique to the specific carton, though it is unique to the specific product. So therefore, if multiple cartons of bourbon&coke were bought in the hours preceding the party, you would not know for sure which of those cartons ended up at the party, just that one of them did.

Other plausible scenarios:

The carton was bought in advance, whether that be the morning of the party, a day before, a week before, etc. I know in my own experience, that if I’m going to be at the shops buying groceries on a particular day and I also know that there is a party to go to in a couple of days, I’ll buy my booze at that time to save making another trip.

The carton was bought previously for another occasion and only part consumed. The carton was then used to transport the remaining 2/3/4 4-packs to this party.

Someone else other than the attendee bought the carton. Be that parents, spouse/partner, sibling, housemate. i.e, housemate says he’s going to the bottle-o and asks if you want anything, you say yeah mate, a carton of bourbon, here’s $XX, cheers.

But, sure, it’s a fool-proof idea dungfungus

#20
PBO1:12 pm, 11 Jul 14

Easy, go back to the Facebook invite and get the IP address of whomever posted the party details, that is where you can send the bill. Anyone who thinks that this cannot be done is in for a surprise.

#21
Ghettosmurf872:34 pm, 11 Jul 14

PBO said :

Easy, go back to the Facebook invite and get the IP address of whomever posted the party details, that is where you can send the bill. Anyone who thinks that this cannot be done is in for a surprise.

And what would you charge that person with? Yes, they created an event and suggested people should go there, but how is anyone to know that they actually attended? Or that they were the ones that caused the damage?

I want whoever caused the damage to pay for it as much as anyone else, but you need proof if you want the charges to stick, and i would suggest that the creation of the idea is hardly going to be enough in a court of law.

#22
PBO9:31 am, 14 Jul 14

Ghettosmurf87 said :

PBO said :

Easy, go back to the Facebook invite and get the IP address of whomever posted the party details, that is where you can send the bill. Anyone who thinks that this cannot be done is in for a surprise.

And what would you charge that person with? Yes, they created an event and suggested people should go there, but how is anyone to know that they actually attended? Or that they were the ones that caused the damage?

I want whoever caused the damage to pay for it as much as anyone else, but you need proof if you want the charges to stick, and i would suggest that the creation of the idea is hardly going to be enough in a court of law.

Cross reference the car licence plates with IP addresses and charge them with criminal tresspass, destruction of property, instigating riotous behaviour with malicious intent, misuse of a carriage device to willfully cause damage? I am sure that there is a whole book that they can throw at them and hopefully a judge that will actually bring down the law on these little s#@ts.

#23
Maya12310:15 am, 14 Jul 14

Ghettosmurf87 said :

PBO said :

Easy, go back to the Facebook invite and get the IP address of whomever posted the party details, that is where you can send the bill. Anyone who thinks that this cannot be done is in for a surprise.

And what would you charge that person with? Yes, they created an event and suggested people should go there, but how is anyone to know that they actually attended? Or that they were the ones that caused the damage?

I want whoever caused the damage to pay for it as much as anyone else, but you need proof if you want the charges to stick, and i would suggest that the creation of the idea is hardly going to be enough in a court of law.

Even if the person who posted the invitation did not attend or do the damage, they were inviting people to break and enter a house they did not own. But I imagine facebook will likely not co-operate.

#24
dungfungus3:25 pm, 14 Jul 14

Ghettosmurf87 said :

dungfungus said :

In this case the carton was bourbon and cola and it would have purchased on the way to the party so it would be a simple matter of checking grog shops in the vicinity in the hours before the party started.

It’s probably not quite that simple, though I see your point. As pointed out earlier, the barcode is not unique to the specific carton, though it is unique to the specific product. So therefore, if multiple cartons of bourbon&coke were bought in the hours preceding the party, you would not know for sure which of those cartons ended up at the party, just that one of them did.

Other plausible scenarios:

The carton was bought in advance, whether that be the morning of the party, a day before, a week before, etc. I know in my own experience, that if I’m going to be at the shops buying groceries on a particular day and I also know that there is a party to go to in a couple of days, I’ll buy my booze at that time to save making another trip.

The carton was bought previously for another occasion and only part consumed. The carton was then used to transport the remaining 2/3/4 4-packs to this party.

Someone else other than the attendee bought the carton. Be that parents, spouse/partner, sibling, housemate. i.e, housemate says he’s going to the bottle-o and asks if you want anything, you say yeah mate, a carton of bourbon, here’s $XX, cheers.

But, sure, it’s a fool-proof idea dungfungus

I think this “party” was an impromtu event in which case the grog would have been bought on the way. Not many bogans would be able to fit a standbye carton of bourbon and cola in their home fridge.
Then again, the police would have to actually make some field enquiries at local grog shops and that never happens these days.
They still knock on your door to serve summons’ for traffic offences though.

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