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Police targeting impaired drivers in May

By 8 May 2014 13

ACT Policing is targeting alcohol and drug impaired driving this month as part of our multi-agency road safety strategy.

With 1,357 drunk drivers and 116 drug impaired drivers removed from ACT roads during 2013, roadside alcohol and drug screening is a key strategy in ACT Policing’s approach to road safety.

Traffic Operations Sergeant Rod Anderson said high-visibility patrols along with unmarked police vehicles will be conducting both targeted and random alcohol and drug screening.

“Roadside alcohol or drug screening can happen anywhere and at any time – and any vehicle could be an unmarked RBT vehicle. If you think you can avoid police by driving home using back streets, think again – every police vehicle is equipped to be a mobile breath test station,” Sergeant Anderson said.

“Alcohol and drug impaired drivers pose the highest risk on our roads; by removing these drivers we reduce the potential for serious injury or fatal collisions on our roads.”

About 5.30pm last night (May 7), police conducted a roadside breath test on a 33-year-old Rivett woman on Sulwood Drive, Kambah. The woman returned a positive result and was conveyed to Tuggeranong Station for a breath analysis, which returned a high-range result of 0.183. The driver explained she had been on her way to pick up her daughter from childcare. The driver was identified as a repeat offender and will face the ACT Magistrates Court at a later date.

“Drivers should know by now that it’s drink or drive, not both. If you do choose to drive impaired by alcohol or drugs, you not only risk your life and the lives of others, you will be caught and face the full consequence of your actions.”

Impaired drivers are required to appear before the court and face fines of up to $1,650 (alcohol) and $1,100 (drugs) for first time offenders, imprisonment, or both. Repeat offenders face harsher consequences with fines up to $2,200 (alcohol) and $2,750 (drugs), imprisonment, or both. An offending driver can also face a loss of their driver’s licence for a period specified by the court.

(ACT Policing Media Release)

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13 Responses to Police targeting impaired drivers in May
#1
bd845:31 pm, 08 May 14

I know this release is just to get inside people’s heads and think before drink driving, but it really does make it sound like they’re targeting it now after previously ignoring it.

#2
bigred8:18 pm, 08 May 14

still waiting for tailgating or foglight month

#3
magiccar98:21 pm, 08 May 14

I hope they do a better job this month than they did last. I saw more drivers running blatant orange/red lights than ever! Special note to the double length dump druck who actually passed through the intersection at athllon and hindmarsh drives when the opposite light had been green for several seconds. Good work!

#4
bigfeet10:55 pm, 08 May 14

bigred said :

still waiting for tailgating or foglight month

You have certainly had an obsession on Riotact for many years about foglights. Out of all the traffic issues people could get fixated on this, to me, seem to be at the very low end of the scale. In fact, I can’t even understand why having your fog lights on is illegal.

Who decides if it is foggy enough to have them on? Is it really that terrible to have them on when it is just misty? Or a little bit overcast? Or a chance of rain? Or sunny?

Is there something I am missing that makes it life-threatening?

#5
jl4:52 am, 09 May 14

The fact that there are repeat offenders tells me the previous punishment wasn’t enough. Never heard of anybody getting imprisonment unless they kill somebody (and even then…wow, not very often).

#6
bigred10:19 pm, 09 May 14

bigfeet said :

bigred said :

still waiting for tailgating or foglight month

You have certainly had an obsession on Riotact for many years about foglights. Out of all the traffic issues people could get fixated on this, to me, seem to be at the very low end of the scale. In fact, I can’t even understand why having your fog lights on is illegal.

Who decides if it is foggy enough to have them on? Is it really that terrible to have them on when it is just misty? Or a little bit overcast? Or a chance of rain? Or sunny?

Is there something I am missing that makes it life-threatening?

You miss a lot. The road rules are very clear. Why not comply?

#7
Alderney7:19 am, 10 May 14

bigred said :

The road rules are very clear. Why not comply?

Whilst I agree the road rules ARE very clear and people should comply, I don’t see loads/many/any people driving around with their fog lights on…but maybe I just don’t get out enough.

#8
bigfeet12:44 pm, 10 May 14

bigred said :

You miss a lot. The road rules are very clear. Why not comply?

Actually they are not clear. They say you cannot operate fog lights unless “driving in fog or other hazardous weather conditions causing reduced visibility”

A bright sunny day could be a hazardous weather condition causing reduced visibility. As could rain, fog, mist, sea spray, strong wind blowing dust around or a multitude of other conditions.

So really, you could legally have them on at almost any time.

I can honestly say, however, I can’t ever recall seeing another car on the road with its fog lights on, or if I did it is so inoffensive that I didn’t notice it. To tell you the truth I wouldn’t even know how to switch mine on.

But anyway, you didn’t answer the question. Why the obsession?

#9
Pork Hunt4:30 pm, 10 May 14

Alderney said :

bigred said :

The road rules are very clear. Why not comply?

Whilst I agree the road rules ARE very clear and people should comply, I don’t see loads/many/any people driving around with their fog lights on…but maybe I just don’t get out enough.

Try driving to work at six am. The correct way to operate fog lights is with your head lights OFF.

#10
bigred4:56 pm, 10 May 14

bigfeet said :

bigred said :

You miss a lot. The road rules are very clear. Why not comply?

Actually they are not clear. They say you cannot operate fog lights unless “driving in fog or other hazardous weather conditions causing reduced visibility”

A bright sunny day could be a hazardous weather condition causing reduced visibility. As could rain, fog, mist, sea spray, strong wind blowing dust around or a multitude of other conditions.

So really, you could legally have them on at almost any time.

I can honestly say, however, I can’t ever recall seeing another car on the road with its fog lights on, or if I did it is so inoffensive that I didn’t notice it. To tell you the truth I wouldn’t even know how to switch mine on.

But anyway, you didn’t answer the question. Why the obsession?

No obsession at all. I drive a small low to the ground econobox and am often dazzled by the damn things. Partner has same issues with them. A couple of times it has resulted in near misses.

#11
Queen_of_the_Bun10:15 am, 11 May 14

bigred said :

bigfeet said :

bigred said :

You miss a lot. The road rules are very clear. Why not comply?

Actually they are not clear. They say you cannot operate fog lights unless “driving in fog or other hazardous weather conditions causing reduced visibility”

A bright sunny day could be a hazardous weather condition causing reduced visibility. As could rain, fog, mist, sea spray, strong wind blowing dust around or a multitude of other conditions.

So really, you could legally have them on at almost any time.

I can honestly say, however, I can’t ever recall seeing another car on the road with its fog lights on, or if I did it is so inoffensive that I didn’t notice it. To tell you the truth I wouldn’t even know how to switch mine on.

But anyway, you didn’t answer the question. Why the obsession?

No obsession at all. I drive a small low to the ground econobox and am often dazzled by the damn things. Partner has same issues with them. A couple of times it has resulted in near misses.

Maybe if your car is that low to the ground, it’s regular headlights not foglights that are dazzling you. I drive a small car and have never had a problem with foglights. Sometimes with high beam, but I don’t think I’ve even seen a car with foglights on.

Drive safe!

#12
Earl12:09 pm, 11 May 14

The greater risk is NOT having fog lights or low beams on in foggy conditions. The last foggy morning I witnessed over half of all drivers who must have no clue just how invisible they are without lights on. As soon as you see any fog anywhere, just chuck your lights on! It’s not going to cost you money!

#13
bigred10:49 pm, 11 May 14

Earl said :

The greater risk is NOT having fog lights or low beams on in foggy conditions. The last foggy morning I witnessed over half of all drivers who must have no clue just how invisible they are without lights on. As soon as you see any fog anywhere, just chuck your lights on! It’s not going to cost you money!

The actual issue is appropriate use of equipment in order to not inconvenience or endanger fellow citizens.

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