Police targeting traffic control

By 29 May, 2013 19

ACT Policing issued a total of 136 Traffic Infringement Notices (TINs) and 101 cautions for Traffic Control offences during the month of May as part of its multi-agency road safety strategy.
At different periods during the year, the strategy targets specific issues and behaviours which contribute to death and serious injuries on Canberra’s roads, with Traffic Controls among those concerns.

Officer in Charge of Traffic Operations Sergeant Rod Anderson said ACT Policing’s focus on Traffic Controls during the month of May was aimed at keeping our roads safer.

“We know from the statistics provided by Territory and Municipal Services (TAMS) that a large number of vehicle collisions in the ACT occur at intersections including traffic lights and turn arrows, roundabouts and at intersections controlled by signs (i.e. give way and stop),” Sergeant Anderson said.
“As a result ACT Policing paid particular attention during the month of May on drivers disobeying red and amber lights/arrows, not stopping or giving way at intersections whether controlled by signs or not and drivers not using a roundabout correctly including indicating off roundabouts.”

“It’s important that motorists heed and obey traffic rules to ensure the safety of all those traveling on our roads.”

Territory and Municipal Senior Manager Rifaat Shoukrallah said statistics showed that about 55 per cent of collisions on ACT Roads occurred at intersections in 2012.

“8312 collisions were recorded on ACT roads last year. Of these, 4593 occurred at intersections,” Mr Shoukrallah said.

“We’re asking all road users to take extra care at intersections. This includes giving way to oncoming traffic, leaving a decent gap between your car and the car in front of you and indicating when leaving a roundabout.”

Fines for different Traffic Control offences range from a minimum of $167 and the loss of two demerit points to $291 and the loss of three demerit points for each offence.

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19 Responses to Police targeting traffic control
#1
beardedclam3:32 pm, 29 May 13

136 TIN’s and 101 cautions for the whole month??
Just doesnt seem like alot to me. Is it the campaign working or not enough officers on the beat?

#2
p14:06 pm, 29 May 13

At different periods during the year, the strategy targets specific issues and behaviours which contribute to death and serious injuries on Canberra’s roads, with Traffic Controls among those concerns.

Traffic controls contribute to death and serious injury?

Territory and Municipal Senior Manager Rifaat Shoukrallah said statistics showed that about 55 per cent of collisions on ACT Roads occurred at intersections in 2012.

But I thought speeding caused all accidents in Canberra? Are people consistently speeding through intersections? maybe speed cameras shouldn’t be on straight bits of road after all?

#3
bikhet4:06 pm, 29 May 13

beardedclam said :

136 TIN’s and 101 cautions for the whole month??
Just doesnt seem like alot to me. Is it the campaign working or not enough officers on the beat?

They heard about the new fine payment system and decided “What’s the point.”

#4
carnardly5:42 pm, 29 May 13

Not at an intersection, but I witnessed yet again another fine example of “too close and too fast” this morning.

I was wandering over the pedestrian bridge over Parkes way near the ferry terminal and boom boom – a 3 car nose to tailer on the eastbound middle lane of Parkes way below. There were many other people walking over the bridge at the same time and all stopped for a look. Some laughed.

Why do people get up each other’s bums *that* closely that they can’t stop from 40 to 50 kmph of speed without barrelling into the car in front.

#5
JC5:55 pm, 29 May 13

carnardly said :

Why do people get up each other’s bums *that* closely that they can’t stop from 40 to 50 kmph of speed without barrelling into the car in front.

Simple answer and happened to me this morning on Gininderra Drive. See if you leave a safe gap between your own car and the car in front then someone will see all that “wasted space” and want to fill it. If you then slow down to once again leave a safe space then someone else will fill that space and so on. The end result is you will eventually come to a complete stop.

Now don’t laugh I recall reading an article years ago when I lived in Sydney that said if drivers going along Anzac Parade were to obey all traffic rules, including leaving a safe distance then due to the behaviour of other drivers as described above it was take the best part of 2 hours to drive from Maroubra to the City.

#6
magiccar97:44 pm, 29 May 13

“not using a roundabout correctly including indicating off roundabouts.”
I honestly can’t remember the last time I saw a police officer indicate leaving a roundabout. The only people who do it a duttering old biffers, or learners with instructors. Its a pointless rule.

Perhaps the reason so many collisions occur at intersections and roundabouts is because the planning of them is absolute rubbish. Why do we need abnormal roundabouts that have 5-6 exits when a simple 4 way intersection would suffice? They listed the top black spots around Canberra and the majority were the abstract intersections like the roundabout at Canberra Av and Wentworth Av. People just don’t know what to do so they panic, which is when accidents happen.

They need to put in place people who plan roads using their brains rather than the bums, then they might see some improvements.

#7
EvanJames9:22 pm, 29 May 13

OMG, they’re enforcing indicating when leaving roundabouts? Holy crap. I’m impressed.

#8
bd8412:02 am, 30 May 13

Doesn’t seem to have a large impact, they could get that many in one day standing at every intersection on Northbourne Ave/Federal Hwy or at Belconnen Way and the GDE.

#9
patrick_keogh7:53 am, 30 May 13

Not surprising that there are so few detections of these offences. Last weekend (yes, in May) I was stopped at the traffic lights at the intersection of Benjamin Way and College Street. A police car with three officers was stopped on the front row of the lights going southbound on Benjamin Way. A car came down Nettlefold Street, and went through a light so red that the police car had a green light less than a second later. Did any one of the three notice? I don’t know. However they certainly made no attempt to follow and stop the offending vehicle.

#10
patrick_keogh7:55 am, 30 May 13

JC said :

Now don’t laugh I recall reading an article years ago when I lived in Sydney that said if drivers going along Anzac Parade were to obey all traffic rules, including leaving a safe distance then due to the behaviour of other drivers as described above it was take the best part of 2 hours to drive from Maroubra to the City.

I bet the drivers who were involved in the collision took longer than two hours to get to work though. The old road safety maxim about “Better to be late than dead on time” comes to mind.

#11
kumadude8:00 am, 30 May 13

magiccar9 said :

“not using a roundabout correctly including indicating off roundabouts.”
The only people who do it a duttering old biffers, or learners with instructors. Its a pointless rule.

I disagree, using a blinker entering and exiting roundabouts shows consideration to others waiting to enter. The flow of traffic is far more efficient and petrol consumption is reduced: those waiting can tell what you wish to do, react accordingly, usually not need to come to a complete halt, therefore not needing to a whole lot of petrol getting out of first gear.

The use of blinkers should be an automatic prerequisite response to turning, changing lanes and entering/exiting roundabouts. When I witness people not using blinkers I wonder if they are on drugs, drunk, uncoordinated, mentally suffering, foreigners on holiday or simply Canberrans.

#12
Spiral9:11 am, 30 May 13

Indicating to leave roundabouts seems to be a tricky issue when the driver is going straight through.

For a large roundabout it makes sense to indicate when you want to exit, even if you are going straight through as other users may not have seen where you entered.

For small roundabouts there is often so little time that some people put their left indicator on even before they enter the roundabout, making it difficult for other users to judge if the driver is actually turning left or going straight through.

#13
EvanJames9:41 am, 30 May 13

magiccar9 said :

“not using a roundabout correctly including indicating off roundabouts.”
I honestly can’t remember the last time I saw a police officer indicate leaving a roundabout. The only people who do it a duttering old biffers, or learners with instructors. Its a pointless rule.

It’s not a pointless rule, it’s common sense and is a courtesy to cars waiting to enter the roundabout; indicating tells them that they can. Traffic flows better, there’s less delays caused by roundabouts.

Plus, when you see someone exiting a roundabout with their right indicator going, they are demonstrating that they are a drooling moron.

#14
curmudgery11:45 am, 30 May 13

The three rules I use to keep me and my family safe on the roads are:

Always tell the others what you intend to do – then do that. Don’t do anything else.
Always leave an ‘idiot gap’. If someone takes it, make a new one.
Everyone on the road is an idiot except me – and I’m not real sure about me.

Stay safe, Rioters.

#15
tim_c3:20 pm, 30 May 13

kumadude said :

The use of blinkers should be an automatic prerequisite response to turning, changing lanes and entering/exiting roundabouts. When I witness people not using blinkers I wonder if they are on drugs, drunk, uncoordinated, mentally suffering, foreigners on holiday or simply Canberrans.

Probably on the ‘phone…

#16
JC7:43 pm, 30 May 13

kumadude said :

I disagree, using a blinker entering and exiting roundabouts shows consideration to others waiting to enter. The flow of traffic is far more efficient and petrol consumption is reduced: those waiting can tell what you wish to do, react accordingly, usually not need to come to a complete halt, therefore not needing to a whole lot of petrol getting out of first gear.

If people indicate properly on ENTRY then it is quite easy to work out where the car is going without the need for a left indication on exit with the benefits, however small you mention above. The only places this really doesn’t apply is roundabouts with 5 or more exits, as clearly those going to the 4th, 5th will be indicating the same as to which exit to use. But not too many of these around Canberra in particular.

That said it isn’t hard to indicate on exit for all the larger roundabouts around the place. The smaller generally suburban ones different story, but guess that why the law says to indicate unless it is not practicable to do so.

#17
JC7:45 pm, 30 May 13

Spiral said :

Indicating to leave roundabouts seems to be a tricky issue when the driver is going straight through.

For a large roundabout it makes sense to indicate when you want to exit, even if you are going straight through as other users may not have seen where you entered.

For small roundabouts there is often so little time that some people put their left indicator on even before they enter the roundabout, making it difficult for other users to judge if the driver is actually turning left or going straight through.

Small roundabouts are pointless in many cases hence why the law says indicate unless it is not practicable to do so.

#18
kumadude7:35 am, 31 May 13

JC said :

kumadude said :

I disagree, using a blinker entering and exiting roundabouts shows consideration to others waiting to enter. The flow of traffic is far more efficient and petrol consumption is reduced: those waiting can tell what you wish to do, react accordingly, usually not need to come to a complete halt, therefore not needing to a whole lot of petrol getting out of first gear.

If people indicate properly on ENTRY then it is quite easy to work out where the car is going without the need for a left indication on exit with the benefits, however small you mention above. The only places this really doesn’t apply is roundabouts with 5 or more exits, as clearly those going to the 4th, 5th will be indicating the same as to which exit to use. But not too many of these around Canberra in particular.

That said it isn’t hard to indicate on exit for all the larger roundabouts around the place. The smaller generally suburban ones different story, but guess that why the law says to indicate unless it is not practicable to do so.

Again I disagree, I am simply hearing waffle waffle excuse excuse for lack of discipline and inability to operate a vehicle.

Consider the situation where a person wishing to enter a round and a car is coming round with their right hand blinker on. At this point the person waiting does not know if they will take the exit adjacent to them or the driver is doing a full uturn. Strangely, the driver takes the adjacent exit with their right hand indicator still on.

The minimum that driver could have done is tapped the indicator off with their right hand, better would have been to flick it all the way up, suggesting they are turning left of the roundabout.

The waiting driver is now still there befuddled and being beeped at from behind.

Operating a vehicle is not simply pressing a few pedals in combination, it is about domination of the mechanics and electrical engineering whilst also being connected with the flow and rhythm of the road. I believe you should ride the road like a wave, smooth lines. I know this may sound tossy to you, but some people do not have the cognitive ability nor the passive appreciation of roads to drive properly.

#19
IrishPete9:20 pm, 31 May 13

Will they ever target fog lights, or tailgating? My thoughts go out to the male dickhead driver of the NSW-registered Sangyong Musso silver dual cab ute who tailgated me, then everyone else, on Parkes Way westbound this afternoon around 2pm, leaving Parkes Way at the ANU turnoff. You clearly have some psychological problems, mate, and I hope you seek help and are successful in resolving them. In the meantime, I suggest you stop driving.

IP

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