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Public transport failure?

By johnboy - 15 January 2013 57

The ABC has word on an RMIT study on Canberra’s public transport policy which is less than kind.

The national study by a Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) academic found Canberra was no where near meeting any of its sustainable transport targets.

It says the national capital has experienced a sustained decline in public transport and a steady rise in car driving over most of the past two decades.

Canberra was the only capital city where public transport share actually fell in the five years to 2011.

The report blames poor policies which have focussed on road construction while reversing successful public transport measures in place until the late 1980s.

Who would have thought mouthing empty platitudes wouldn’t pay off?

What’s Your opinion?


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57 Responses to
Public transport failure?
1
davo101 9:49 am
15 Jan 13
#

p. 25 if you want to read the original. My favourite bit:

Current plans to replace one of the ‘frequent’ services with a light rail line do not change the fundamentally flawed nature of planning a public transport system that offers a real choice to only a minority of the population. Rather, it confirms that Canberra’s light rail scheme runs the risk of replicating the poor performance of some US light rail systems and Sydney’s single line.

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2
Rollersk8r 10:18 am
15 Jan 13
#

davo101 said :

p. 25 if you want to read the original. My favourite bit:

Current plans to replace one of the ‘frequent’ services with a light rail line do not change the fundamentally flawed nature of planning a public transport system that offers a real choice to only a minority of the population. Rather, it confirms that Canberra’s light rail scheme runs the risk of replicating the poor performance of some US light rail systems and Sydney’s single line.

Strongly agree!

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3
Antagonist 10:34 am
15 Jan 13
#

Rollersk8r said :

davo101 said :

p. 25 if you want to read the original. My favourite bit:

Current plans to replace one of the ‘frequent’ services with a light rail line do not change the fundamentally flawed nature of planning a public transport system that offers a real choice to only a minority of the population. Rather, it confirms that Canberra’s light rail scheme runs the risk of replicating the poor performance of some US light rail systems and Sydney’s single line.

Strongly agree!

Shane obviously did not read that part: “Certainly we need to get the balance right and put more effort into public transport, Mr Rattenbury said. “That’s why I’m very pleased that as a result of the Greens-Labor parliamentary agreement we are moving towards developing light rail in the ACT. Nice one, Shane :)

The author of the study sums it up nicely right here: “But the bottom line in terms of service frequency, connections, speed and directness of service… then that’s generally got worse in the last few years.”

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4
Chop71 10:42 am
15 Jan 13
#

Why not give light rail to those who have waited the longest, ie Woden / Belconnen and then Tuggers.

No wonder residents outside the inner north voted like they did in the last election.

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5
johnboy 10:46 am
15 Jan 13
#

Belco voted pretty well for the government…

of course a headline candidate pairing of Coe and Dunne wouldn’t have helped.

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6
Ray Polglaze 11:21 am
15 Jan 13
#

It’s worth reading the two pages on Canberra in the report (pp. 25-26). It’s a comprehensive fail by the Labor Government. Mees concludes “Canberra needs to replace its current transport policies with an approach based on the experience of cities where public transport has succeeded, not those where it has failed”. But is this a realistic proposal?

http://mams.rmit.edu.au/ov14prh13lps1.pdf

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7
Diggety 11:26 am
15 Jan 13
#

Antagonist said :

Rollersk8r said :

davo101 said :

p. 25 if you want to read the original. My favourite bit:

Current plans to replace one of the ‘frequent’ services with a light rail line do not change the fundamentally flawed nature of planning a public transport system that offers a real choice to only a minority of the population. Rather, it confirms that Canberra’s light rail scheme runs the risk of replicating the poor performance of some US light rail systems and Sydney’s single line.

Strongly agree!

Shane obviously did not read that part: “Certainly we need to get the balance right and put more effort into public transport, Mr Rattenbury said. “That’s why I’m very pleased that as a result of the Greens-Labor parliamentary agreement we are moving towards developing light rail in the ACT. Nice one, Shane :)

So a major study is conducted into transport studies, and our minister for transport doesn’t read it. But makes public comment on it anyway.

I don’t think Shane Rattenbury hasn’t dropped his Greenpeace work ethic at all. A worry considering the importance of his portfolios.

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8
HiddenDragon 11:49 am
15 Jan 13
#

After a suitable period of hand wringing and various other gestures of concern, this, and other such studies will be used as another excuse to increase parking fees, introduce parking fees where they do not yet apply, and reduce parking spaces – all in order to “encourage” car-driving recalcitrants to use more sustainable forms of transport. In the meantime, the elected officials, and their senior non-elected courtiers, will continue to enjoy their publicly funded cars and privileged parking spaces.

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9
Ben_Dover 12:05 pm
15 Jan 13
#

davo101 said :

p. 25 if you want to read the original. My favourite bit:

Current plans to replace one of the ‘frequent’ services with a light rail line do not change the fundamentally flawed nature of planning a public transport system that offers a real choice to only a minority of the population. Rather, it confirms that Canberra’s light rail scheme runs the risk of replicating the poor performance of some US light rail systems and Sydney’s single line.

Well that virtually guarantees we’re going to get the bloody thing then.

You vote out the greens at election time, and still end up with the greens holding the balance of power, you’re stuffed.

Alice down the rabbit hole stuff, but with a Rat instead of a rabbit.

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10
Deref 12:20 pm
15 Jan 13
#

HiddenDragon said :

After a suitable period of hand wringing and various other gestures of concern, this, and other such studies will be used as another excuse to increase parking fees, introduce parking fees where they do not yet apply, and reduce parking spaces – all in order to “encourage” car-driving recalcitrants to use more sustainable forms of transport. In the meantime, the elected officials, and their senior non-elected courtiers, will continue to enjoy their publicly funded cars and privileged parking spaces.

Bingo.

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11
Jivrashia 1:28 pm
15 Jan 13
#

reversing successful public transport measures in place until the late 1980s.

What were they?
I can understand measures being eroded by the ever increasing density of the population and traffic, but what were those that were actually REVERSED?

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12
thebrownstreak69 1:37 pm
15 Jan 13
#

Chop71 said :

Why not give light rail to those who have waited the longest, ie Woden / Belconnen and then Tuggers.

No wonder residents outside the inner north voted like they did in the last election.

The intertown service is what works – why implement light rail?

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13
Martlark 1:39 pm
15 Jan 13
#

The big advantage of light rail is the great cost and the inflexibility of the fixed route. Let me explain: if you’ve spent huge dollars on something you’re more likely to encourage it and make it work. ie: increased Government commitment to getting it popular. The fixed route means that people can now rely upon the transport infrastructure and not have to worry that a wave of the hand can change the route (common with bus routes).

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14
davo101 1:41 pm
15 Jan 13
#

Jivrashia said :

reversing successful public transport measures in place until the late 1980s.

What were they?
I can understand measures being eroded by the ever increasing density of the population and traffic, but what were those that were actually REVERSED?

p.7 ff

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15
Diggety 1:47 pm
15 Jan 13
#

Jivrashia said :

reversing successful public transport measures in place until the late 1980s.

What were they?
I can understand measures being eroded by the ever increasing density of the population and traffic, but what were those that were actually REVERSED?

Increased population densities and traffic are more likely to increase public transport. Instead the opposite has happened.

Or so my Urban Planning friends tell me.

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