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Rangehood installation in Canberra?

By 11 January 2013 11

Does anyone have any idea how much it will cost to install a new rangehood and what type of contractor do you call in to do the install?

My new house doesn’t have rangehood in the kitchen, only a vent above the stove. Therefore, I bought an canopy rangehood and I want it to be ducted to external.

What kind of costs am and I looking and who do I call to do the work?

Thank you.

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11 Responses to Rangehood installation in Canberra?
#1
neanderthalsis2:12 pm, 11 Jan 13

Oh so many questions that need to be answered…

Is there a nearby window to run it out of or are you planning on venting out through a hole in the wall?

Is it just the canopy or are you planning on mounting it as part of an overhead cabinet?

Is it a plug & play or does it need to be wired in?

I would talk to the company you bought it off. They would probably have a preferred installer that can ensure you meet all of the warranty requirements.

#2
rosscoact3:13 pm, 11 Jan 13

I’ve asked this question and as it can need a variety of trades people dependant oin whether you have ducting etc (eg carpenter, electrician, plumber) I reckon a kitchen install company is the only chance you have.

Alternatively what neanderthalsis saud, I’ll buy your range hood if you install.

Let me know how you go.

#3
wildturkeycanoe4:30 pm, 11 Jan 13

Obviously you bought the canopy style as there aren’t cupboards above the stove? This makes it a little easier. Consider a few things here.
1) Power for rangehood – can be taken from an adjacent power point near the stove. If there isn’t one within 600mm either side, you’ll have to get the sparky into the ceiling and if it’s an internal wall it isn’t easy to get a new cable down. If the stove is against an external wall, then it’s not so bad. Knowing prices for these it would be anywhere from $100 [cheap mate's rates] to $200+???
2) If the vent has to go through the roof you need an external vent kit and these are almost as much as the rangehood itself, approx $200. Then the labor to install it. Tile roof, a bit harder as you have to do the flashing around the tiles. Tin is easier [our new house has tin and the vent up there for the gas heater is done with a decktite style setup]. I only say this because I don’t think it is legal to vent the stove into the ceiling anymore??? Anyone clarify?
If the stove is against the external wall it is easier to expel the exhaust out the side of the house rather than through the ceiling and there are kits for these too, but you don’t need the canopy style rangehood.
I’ve probably confused you more but these are the things I’ve had to think about with mine, as it currently vents back into the kitchen instead of externally.
Importantly too, with gas stoves there is a minimum distance the range hood must be from the stovetop. I think a one stop installer might be the best bet, unless you have “contacts” who can do it cheaper.

#4
screaming banshee5:42 pm, 11 Jan 13

750mm from the gas hob from memory

#5
seven_mild6:26 pm, 11 Jan 13

Thank you guys.

There is no cabinet above the stove. But the stove is not against the external wall.

I think I can buy external vent kit in bunnings, however, I need to find installer to install it.

Any recommendation for the installer?

#6
Righto6:30 pm, 11 Jan 13

I have re-installed the ducting for a rangehood and do not agree that it is easier with a steel roof. You can get a flashing for a tile roof where the rubber boot slides over the vent pipe and tucks under the tile above then wraps over the below tiles. Relatively easy compared to a metal roof where you have to cut a hole in the roof and seal it. Usually the sealing doesn’t work properly and you get leaks.
You also need to get access to the roof space which is very difficult with a metal roof, but with tiles you can just slide them aside. Usually the roof space is too small to work in so you have to remove the tiles to do the job but if you have metal – good luck.
Usually installers put the cheap thin flexible duct from the vent pipe to the rangehood. It is just rubbish and usually fails after a year or so, but what do they care.
Most rangehoods are just decoration anyway 60% looks and 40% function.
Dont buy Omega.

#7
JC7:53 pm, 11 Jan 13

wildturkeycanoe said :

Obviously you bought the canopy style as there aren’t cupboards above the stove? This makes it a little easier. Consider a few things here.
1) Power for rangehood – can be taken from an adjacent power point near the stove. If there isn’t one within 600mm either side, you’ll have to get the sparky into the ceiling and if it’s an internal wall it isn’t easy to get a new cable down. If the stove is against an external wall, then it’s not so bad. Knowing prices for these it would be anywhere from $100 [cheap mate's rates] to $200+???

You will find that having an ‘outlet’ in the roof above the range hood will suffice, so it will be a simple matter for a licenced sparky to find a suitable circuit and put it in. The flex from the range hood would then be hidden behind the metal trim peice that normally comes with this type of range hood. So not hard.

The biggest issue is getting someone to do the ‘roof plumbing’.

#8
Russ11:13 pm, 11 Jan 13

JC said :

You will find that having an ‘outlet’ in the roof above the range hood will suffice.

I’d be surprised if this is still allowed – you fill the roof space with smoke and cooking smells, which can come back down through bathroom exhaust fans, and you risk coating the timber in the roof with grease.

When I did our kitchen, the range hood got a flue straight up, through the ceiling, through the tin with a deck-tite (which has never leaked) and out into the open air. I’m not a fan of through-the-wall installations, as a strong wind against the outlet can stop the rangehood from working resulting in a kitchen full of smoke.

#9
JC8:16 am, 12 Jan 13

Russ said :

JC said :

You will find that having an ‘outlet’ in the roof above the range hood will suffice.

I’d be surprised if this is still allowed – you fill the roof space with smoke and cooking smells, which can come back down through bathroom exhaust fans, and you risk coating the timber in the roof with grease.

When I did our kitchen, the range hood got a flue straight up, through the ceiling, through the tin with a deck-tite (which has never leaked) and out into the open air. I’m not a fan of through-the-wall installations, as a strong wind against the outlet can stop the rangehood from working resulting in a kitchen full of smoke.

If you read my reply in the context I replied in you will see I am talking about the power outlet and I am not making any comment in relation to the exhaust.

You will find that you will have an exhaust duct coming from the unit which you can either duct into the ceiling or outside (and yes the ceiling is still ok), you then have a more decorative cover over the duct. The power cable runs between the two to the roof cavity where the power socket is located. It has not effect what so ever on where the exhaust air goes.

#10
I_P11:07 am, 12 Jan 13

I recommend Rob from Taurus Plumbing and Gas. He is the authorised repairer for Qasair, Schweigen, Bosch etc rangehoods and we got an extra 2 years manufacturers warranty because we used him (authorised installer).

http://www.truelocal.com.au/business/taurus-plumbing-and-gas-pty-ltd/ngunnawal

My rangehood is fairly large and twin motor and installation was $770.

#11
Riley853:24 pm, 12 Jan 13

Give Dan from D&C Carpentry a call 0425 309 199

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