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respect for all creatures, as long as they don’t smell bad or look ugly

By 14 June 2009 66

My place of work has called in the exterminators to get rid of some mice who have made the office their home.  The exterminators use bait stations which attract the mice, who eat the poison and run off to die.  I understand the death involves internal bleeding, which doesn’t sound like a painless way to go. 

I understand people not wanting to share their work places or homes with other creatures and am well aware that mice are considered to be a pest.  But surely there is a way to either repel them from settling there in the first place or, if they do have to be killed, using a humane means of doing so.  Old fashioned traps have the benefit of being quick if they work first time, but pose problems if the mouse is smart enough to try to take the bait with a paw only to find it smashed with a spring loaded metal bar.

Does anyone have any information to share on humane pest control in Canberra?

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66 Responses to respect for all creatures, as long as they don’t smell bad or look ugly
#1
Whatsup4:52 pm, 14 Jun 09

We purchased some “Clever Mouse Traps” from Bunnings. They capture the mouse alive and well so you will need to check them every morning, if they are full we drive to a local park, where we let the little beasties go. No critter handling required, just open the lid and away they run. We use peanut butter as a bait which attracts them nicely.

#2
Morgan5:34 pm, 14 Jun 09

Or carry disease.

You have got to be kidding, clever mouse traps releasing them in the park? They are an introcuced species that are classed as vermin. Give me a break.

#3
farnarkler5:39 pm, 14 Jun 09

I’ll lend you our cats. They’ll soon get rid of the problem.

#4
I-filed6:09 pm, 14 Jun 09

I inquired on this exact topic with the RSPCA. They use inhumane pest control themselves, they said.

#5
barking toad6:17 pm, 14 Jun 09

I assume this thread is a piss-take.

So I’ll suggest AK47s.

If it’s a serious thread, I am embarrassed for reponding.

#6
weeziepops6:28 pm, 14 Jun 09

Death by cat wouldn’t be a nice way to go. Plus one of the people at work is allergic. I understand that some people want to reduce the number of mice which share our world. I don’t agree but am only asking that the killing be done as humanely as possible. It would be good if the RSPCA could offer some advice that would minimise pain to these creatures when humans want to get rid of them.

#7
SheepGroper6:39 pm, 14 Jun 09

The best way would be to make work unattractive to mice, that is by making sure there’s little to attract them in the first place. Could food scraps be luring them in? Dirty kitchen areas inside, food litter from people lunching outside?

#8
BerraBoy686:42 pm, 14 Jun 09

farnarkler said :

I’ll lend you our cats. They’ll soon get rid of the problem.

Hey weeziepops , glad to hear you’re being considerate of even those creatures most consider to be pests, but I’ll say I agree with farnarkler. Cats are the natural solution. It might not be clean and pain free, but it is the ‘green’ solution. Tell your boss that an RSPCA cat and catfood costs less than an exterminator, and they’re fun too.

#9
weeziepops7:21 pm, 14 Jun 09

I’ll give SheepGroper’s advice a try, I think. Cats aren’t an option, unfortunately, as a colleague is allergic. Thanks to those who have taken my post seriously and respected my views.

#10
ant8:02 pm, 14 Jun 09

I often find that mice (not sure if they’re exotic mice or native mice) are living in the compost (one of those bottomless plastic things). They are quite useful, they shred up all the big leaves and things so they compost faster. I realised they were there when I was watering the compost to get it to compost faster, and a very wet mouse appeared and glared at me. Only problem is, it attracts the snakes (as I also discovered the unpleasant way).

#11
Felix the Cat8:32 pm, 14 Jun 09

Maybe some sort of food laced with a drug that puts the mice to sleep and then you can retrieve them and take them to the Vet to be euthanased. Would be a costly way of going about it though.

#12
VYBerlinaV8_the_one_8:50 pm, 14 Jun 09

A vet euthanasing a mouse?

Use a chunk of wood. If they’re already asleep they won’t know about it anyway.

I’ve only ever had to deal with rodents once, and I found Mr Talon did the job nicely.

#13
pug206gti9:20 pm, 14 Jun 09

Internal bleeding – caused by eating the chemical Warfarin.

Wait until your dimmer years, and you too will probably end up on it! Well you’ll be prescribed it anyway.

(I’m serious.)

#14
grunge_hippy9:42 pm, 14 Jun 09

my dog must think its a cat, because it is always catching mice.

#15
Thumper10:03 pm, 14 Jun 09

Mice are sooooo cute, Big black eyes that look at you…

Come on, Awwwwwwwwwwwwwww…

Except my cat bites them in half and eats them….

#16
SkipDaRoo11:10 pm, 14 Jun 09

Get peanut butter to attract them, then tie little Timex watch bombs to them, and then send to an enemies house. You may or may not require Angelina Jolie for this.

#17
Ari11:36 pm, 14 Jun 09

This is a joke thread, right?

#18
Granny2:27 am, 15 Jun 09

I’d say go for the “Clever Mouse Traps” mentioned by Whatsup.

If you are anything like me, then there is nothing more traumatic or disgusting than a mutilated, headless rodent served up to you proudly for breakfast by some over solicitous feline. This is pretty much enough to make me reasonably hysterical. Blood and guts are not my forte.

Traps. Bleah! Same problem.

If you have a small child you may be able to bribe them five dollars or even ten to dispose of the splatted mouse corpse. If you are very unlucky they will still turn you down and you will have to do it yourself whilst pretending that you’re awfully grown up and don’t mind at all, like when you have to take them along for your bloodtest.

Watching them shiver to death with internal bleeding is also not a favourite of mine. The children look at you with big, solemn eyes like you are Adolph Hitler, Ghengis Khan and Ivan the Terrible all rolled into one. Your boss may not do this to you, however the mouse will, especially if it’s a baby.

Perhaps you can donate the mice you catch to a school science lab where they will gas them before dissection. This would probably be pretty painless.

In short, weeziepops, it’s like contraception. There’s no really good solution. They all suck a little bit one way or the other. Just go for the one you find the least horrible.

Best of luck with it all!

#19
enrique8:35 am, 15 Jun 09

Whatsup said :

We purchased some “Clever Mouse Traps” from Bunnings. They capture the mouse alive and well so you will need to check them every morning, if they are full we drive to a local park, where we let the little beasties go. No critter handling required, just open the lid and away they run. We use peanut butter as a bait which attracts them nicely.

It’s views like yours that in the past contributed to numerous other problems we face in this country in relation to introduced pests. Get a grip man – these things are a serious problem in our country.

http://www.cse.csiro.au/research/rodents/Mouse_Plagues.pdf

#20
deezagood9:44 am, 15 Jun 09

I think mice are rather nice;
Their tails are long, their faces small;
They haven’t any chins at all.
Their ears are pink, their teeth are white,
They run about the house at night;
They nibble things they shouldn’t touch,
and, no one seems to like them much,
but, I think mice are rather nice.

We learnt this when I was at Primary School. And I still do think mice are rather nice and we refuse to use mice poisons in our home. There are humane ways to kill these creatures rather than letting them suffer and die slow, miserable deaths. I’m with you on this one Granny and Weezie.

#21
NoAddedMSG10:21 am, 15 Jun 09

Cyanide. It is a very fast death, and according to the one person I have met who experienced cyanide poisoning (didn’t die obviously), it is not very painful.

#22
neanderthalsis10:27 am, 15 Jun 09

Having once lived in an area in the grips of a mouse plague, I have an abject hatred of the little bastards. The grain silos would be full of them but once the grain was gone, they’d go on a rodent rampage and eat anything. When there was nothing left to eat, they all died and left rotting carcasses everywhere. A thorough spraying of Baygon kills them.

I’d suggest a python, put it in the kitchen overnight.

#23
Skidbladnir10:41 am, 15 Jun 09

Cheap, effective, or humane. Pick two.

For mine, a bit of milo mixed with some corn meal\flour & plaster of paris, in an upturned jar lid.

#24
AngryHenry10:45 am, 15 Jun 09

We had a mouse problem earlier this year.

I tried many methods of trying to irradicate them, and after about a fortnight of being kept awake by them trying to get to my dogs kibble I bit the bullet and went for the baiting solution, they have not returned.

Anyone who disturbs my slumber deserves to die a painful death.

In all seriousness, I am an animal lover, but not a pest lover. These things have a brain the size of a grain of rice, they are severly incontinent and they pee everywhere. They pose a serious risk to health and hygeine and the only thing that drives them is food and the unquenchable urge to breed.

Think about this…

- The female mouse will give birth to 4-6 litters a year, which will contain 5-10 young. These young can reproduce three months after birth, so it is calculated, that within one year, a single pair of rodents can be responsible for as many 400-700 pests.

- They contaminate more of your food than they eat and carry disease-causing organisms such as salmonella, rickettsial pox, tapeworm, trichinosis and hantvirus just to name a few.

Kill em! Kill em all!!!

#25
poptop11:04 am, 15 Jun 09

The old spring loaded mouse traps are as close to cheap, effective and humane as you’re likely to get.

Putting the bodies in the compost makes it a green choice too.

Cardboard soaked in a vegetable oil is as effective as just about any other bait.

You do need a LOT of traps. You also need to ensure they aren’t put anywhere where a non-target animal (like children) might do themselves a damage.

#26
nicnacvb11:14 am, 15 Jun 09

I think it’s disgraceful that we humans are the idiots that introduced these pests and yet the animals are the ones that suffer for it.

I believe that pests should be controlled (killed if necessary), but that we should be responsible enough to conscientiously research ways of doing it humanely rather than being lazy and sticking with the cheapest (which just happens to be the most painful, unpleasant) way.

I have in the past used baits because unfortunately I had no alternative. But it would be good if people would put a bit more effort into finding a way to get rid of theses pests humanely and effectively.

#27
Skidbladnir11:24 am, 15 Jun 09

(The jar lid method gets used on a part of a farm where we rarely set foot, so is a fire & forget method of getting rid of bulk lots of mice, where by the time I find them they are shrivelled little husks of mousefur.)

Springtraps and a regular check ftw if you don’t want rotted corpses.

#28
bren11:27 am, 15 Jun 09

Wow, really discussing the big issues here! Mice = pest = disease.

I have ‘catch and release program’ at home for non-dangerous spiders… but for mice? You’re kidding right? Why take them down to the local park, so they can run into someone else’s home – do some community service and terminate them.

#29
VYBerlinaV8_the_one_11:37 am, 15 Jun 09

I have in the past used baits because unfortunately I had no alternative. But it would be good if people would put a bit more effort into finding a way to get rid of theses pests humanely and effectively.

So what are you planning to do about this?

#30
weeziepops11:49 am, 15 Jun 09

It is a big issue for people like me who don’t want to cause suffering in others, whether they be mice or men. I am not saying there is no argument for population control. All I am saying is let it be done humanely and with as little suffering as possible. FFS.

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