Road sign vandalism in Canberra?

By 13 September, 2011 18

Was wondering if the ACT police is doing anything about the mindless twits who seem to enjoy destroying road signs, particularly in Gungahlin (but I’ve noticed the damage further into the city).

I’ve lived all over the country, and have never seen so many destroyed signs in my life.

Some are ripped out of the ground, some appear to have been driven over so they’re flattened, others defaced or just blatantly vandalised / destroyed.

Signs are expensive, and we all end up paying for this mindless stupidity.

Missing/damaged signs represent a safety hazard.

They also look damn ugly, and would lead visitors to Canberra to wonder what’s going on.

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18 Responses to Road sign vandalism in Canberra?
#1
basketcase11:11 am, 13 Sep 11

I’m pleased that the vandalism doesn’t extend to decoration with bullet holes. Gotta look on the bright side :-)

#2
Mysteryman11:41 am, 13 Sep 11

basketcase said :

I’m pleased that the vandalism doesn’t extend to decoration with bullet holes. Gotta look on the bright side :-)

For a long time it did in the Gungahlin region. Bogans from NSW and other parts of Canberra would shoot up the signs back when there weren’t many people living out that way. While the Bogan population on Gungahlin has increased significantly in recent years, the bullet holes fortunately haven’t.

#3
buzz81912:40 pm, 13 Sep 11

Was wondering who ACT Police should be looking at for this behaivour? Maybe they should knock on every door in Gungahlin and ask the resident’s if they are responsible for the behaivour?

Or do you suggest they should spend their times sitting on the roads protecting road signs above all else?

What else should the Police be doing? Why can’t people learn to keep their hand’s to themselves and respect other people’s property?

#4
p112:57 pm, 13 Sep 11

buzz819 said :

Was wondering who ACT Police should be looking at for this behaivour? Maybe they should knock on every door in Gungahlin and ask the resident’s if they are responsible for the behaivour?

Or do you suggest they should spend their times sitting on the roads protecting road signs above all else?

What else should the Police be doing? Why can’t people learn to keep their hand’s to themselves and respect other people’s property?

Speed Cameras would prevent this*.

* - Well, if they weren't so much speed cameras as all-the-time-cameras, and if there was someone watching the picture all the time who would call the police when they saw a "bad person" doing something bad, and the police were in the area and not already busy, and they would arrive in time to catch the "bad person" committing the "bad deed", and arrest them, and the court system would impose a penalty which would either change the bad persons behaviour so that they were no longer a bad person, or it would impose a custodial sentence so that the bad person was isolated from society for a while.

#5
Gerry-Built3:23 pm, 13 Sep 11

I’d say that if most people knew how much road signs cost; there would probably be much greater vigilance in our community…

perhaps the cost should be directly passed on to any offenders who are actually caught… that’d soon stop the buggers…

#6
WilliamZ3:50 pm, 13 Sep 11

I suggest that the problem with the roadsigns is a “sign” of a much deeper and systemic problem on how the ACT does its policing. It basically is a reactive force rather than preventative. I never see cars patrolling, particularly in high crime areas. I never have once seen the police on foot or bike.

There’s a wall of separation between the police and the community. They will respond to your burglary, eventually…in a few hours, maybe more, maybe a lot more. But do they actually prevent crimes?

#7
KeenGolfer5:13 pm, 13 Sep 11

WilliamZ said :

It basically is a reactive force rather than preventative. I never see cars patrolling, particularly in high crime areas. I never have once seen the police on foot or bike.

You need to get out more then. Considering for example the number of drink drivers that are caught in Canberra, how do you think that happens if there are no cars patrolling?

WilliamZ said :

They will respond to your burglary, eventually…in a few hours, maybe more, maybe a lot more.

I take it you have been the victim of a burglary by your comment? Jobs are done on a priority basis. A burglary that has already occurred is at the lower end of the priority scale, so a car will attend when there are no higher priority jobs to attend. Do you want the police to rush to a burglary that has already occurred – rather than attend to someone who is currently being assaulted, or attending someone’s house where the offender is still there?

WilliamZ said :

But do they actually prevent crimes?

Do you really expect the police to be everywhere, all the time, stopping every crime before it occurs? If that’s the case I suggest you lobby the government for more funding for police resources.

#8
WilliamZ5:34 pm, 13 Sep 11

Golfer, if drink driving is really a problem in the ACT, and I suggest that it is…perhaps the punishment dished out/prosecution is not severe enough. And how about having truly random stops that are not so darn ‘predictable’? Other points I made were just observations I put out there…property crime happens because the criminals know they can get away with it. Sounds like comments from the recent London riots. Then again, how much does the ACT spend on community youth centres? You connect the dots…

#9
The Antichrist5:52 pm, 13 Sep 11

WilliamZ said :

I never see cars patrolling, particularly in high crime areas. I never have once seen the police on foot or bike.

There’s a wall of separation between the police and the community. They will respond to your burglary, eventually…in a few hours, maybe more, maybe a lot more. But do they actually prevent crimes?

You don’t spend much time driving around Charnwood, or walking past the Moose at 2am on a Fri/Sat night do ya mate ?

The only wall of seperation here is between your view of life and the real world.

#10
Tooks8:02 pm, 13 Sep 11

WilliamZ said :

I suggest that the problem with the roadsigns is a “sign” of a much deeper and systemic problem on how the ACT does its policing. It basically is a reactive force rather than preventative. I never see cars patrolling, particularly in high crime areas. I never have once seen the police on foot or bike.

There’s a wall of separation between the police and the community. They will respond to your burglary, eventually…in a few hours, maybe more, maybe a lot more. But do they actually prevent crimes?

Police do nothing really. The crooks hand themselves in.

But do they actually prevent crimes?

No. No police patrol has ever prevented a crime.

#11
2620watcher8:51 pm, 13 Sep 11

I applaud those who deface the old wooden mission brown coloured sign in Cook. Always brings a childish smile to my face when sitting at the lights waiting to go!

#12
thatsnotme10:48 pm, 13 Sep 11

WilliamZ said :

I suggest that the problem with the roadsigns is a “sign” of a much deeper and systemic problem on how the ACT does its policing. It basically is a reactive force rather than preventative. I never see cars patrolling, particularly in high crime areas. I never have once seen the police on foot or bike.

There’s a wall of separation between the police and the community. They will respond to your burglary, eventually…in a few hours, maybe more, maybe a lot more. But do they actually prevent crimes?

The Antichrist said :

WilliamZ said :

I never see cars patrolling, particularly in high crime areas. I never have once seen the police on foot or bike.

There’s a wall of separation between the police and the community. They will respond to your burglary, eventually…in a few hours, maybe more, maybe a lot more. But do they actually prevent crimes?

You don’t spend much time driving around Charnwood, or walking past the Moose at 2am on a Fri/Sat night do ya mate ?

The only wall of seperation here is between your view of life and the real world.

+1

Talk to a taxi driver, or courier, and ask them how often they see police out on the roads. I’m sure they’d have a very different story to your average office worker, who drives to and from work every day.

Fortunately for most of us, the work the police do is largely invisible. Personally, I’m happy for it to stay that way.

#13
yellowsnow11:43 pm, 13 Sep 11

People steal the street sign in my street every few weeks. Every time TAMS replaces it, it disappears again. Reason: street name sounds vaguely cool, and no doubt teens think it would be a great addition on their wall alongside Justin Bieber or Timberlake posters or whatever the hell youngins idolise these days. (I won’t say what the street name is because the less scrupulous among you may wish to also add my street sign to your collection).

The obvious solution to the problem is to lobby the powers that be to change the name to something less tempting, like ‘Loser St’, but i doubt they’ll go for it. I guess eventually, once all the bogan teens of Canberra have a copy of the street sign, demand will be exhausted and they’ll move on to coveting another street.

#14
poetix9:14 am, 14 Sep 11

yellowsnow said :

People steal the street sign in my street every few weeks. Every time TAMS replaces it, it disappears again. Reason: street name sounds vaguely cool, and no doubt teens think it would be a great addition on their wall alongside Justin Bieber or Timberlake posters or whatever the hell youngins idolise these days. (I won’t say what the street name is because the less scrupulous among you may wish to also add my street sign to your collection).

The obvious solution to the problem is to lobby the powers that be to change the name to something less tempting, like ‘Loser St’, but i doubt they’ll go for it. I guess eventually, once all the bogan teens of Canberra have a copy of the street sign, demand will be exhausted and they’ll move on to coveting another street.

I think ‘Loser St’ would be a tempting target too, to put near friends’ doors. It is so frustrating not knowing what your ‘vaguely cool’ street is. Any clues? Does it involve drugs, perchance?

#15
troll-sniffer9:36 am, 14 Sep 11

yellowsnow said :

People steal the street sign in my street every few weeks. Every time TAMS replaces it, it disappears again. Reason: street name sounds vaguely cool, and no doubt teens think it would be a great addition on their wall alongside Justin Bieber or Timberlake posters or whatever the hell youngins idolise these days. (I won’t say what the street name is because the less scrupulous among you may wish to also add my street sign to your collection).

The obvious solution to the problem is to lobby the powers that be to change the name to something less tempting, like ‘Loser St’, but i doubt they’ll go for it. I guess eventually, once all the bogan teens of Canberra have a copy of the street sign, demand will be exhausted and they’ll move on to coveting another street.

Aaah no, the obvious solution is to devise a vandal proof (or as close as possible to it) solution. If TAMS are regularluy replacing the sign with no attempt to make it more difficult for the next bogan teen, then they are being negligent with public funds.

I believe Holden Cres in Wanniassa now has vandal proof signage, consisting of an application of white paint on the kerb with the name of the crescent painted thereupon. Not rocket science but possibly too far down the inventive path for the rest of TAMS to copy.

#16
yellowsnow10:33 am, 14 Sep 11

troll-sniffer said :

Aaah no, the obvious solution is to devise a vandal proof (or as close as possible to it) solution. If TAMS are regularluy replacing the sign with no attempt to make it more difficult for the next bogan teen, then they are being negligent with public funds.

Isn’t that what TAMS specialise in – wasting public funds? Classic case was along the bike path leading from Cotter Rd to Molonglo River, near the RSPCA. About two years TAMS planted hundreds of 3-4m tall trees along the path, and watered them weekly all through summer. Must have been quite expensive.

Then, the following autumn Roads ACT contractors came along and bulldozed at least a hundred of these trees to make way for construction of the North Weston Pond. I asked Roads ACT about this. At first they denied anything happened, but then went out to have a look at the site and admitted all the trees had been bulldozed, but then went on to blame TAMS and the lack of communication between agencies in the ACT government. ‘If only TAMS came to us to ask us what was planned for this site, we would have told them not to plan trees there’. Classic Canberra.

#17
Ceej197312:35 am, 15 Sep 11

Same story down in far south Tuggers. Most damage seems to be at roundabouts at a rate of about 1 sign per week. The Govt. doesnt even replace them now. I was quite annoyed when the Govt. went and flattened out all the raised beds on roundabouts. It was obvious the bogans were about to have a field day after the safety nazi’s got there way.

#18
Deref8:47 am, 15 Sep 11

Putting a length of razor wire on the top of the signs, sunk in so that the blades protrude but are invisible from underneath, might prove something of a deterrent for a while.

Speaking of sign vandalism, how about the vandalism of businesses using street signs as advertising space?

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