Selling Second Hand Books in Canberra?

By 8 September, 2011 19

I need to clear a fair few books out of the house.  

Before going the St Vinnies/Lifeline donation route, I wondered if there are any second hand bookshops around which Rioters would recommend as a first port of call?

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19 Responses to Selling Second Hand Books in Canberra?
#1
dtc11:36 am, 08 Sep 11

I have used the one at Lyneham shops and they seemed reasonable. Of course, as you expect they pick out a few books from your pile and don’t pay a huge amount (a few dollars), but its better than nothing. One good thing is that they stock a wide range of books/genres, so they might be interested in a book that no one else is.

#2
excession11:54 am, 08 Sep 11

Gaslight Books out at fyshwick were doing an arrangement where you could ‘trade in’ used books for new ones (for about 20% of the original cost of a book, so a dollar or less a book). That could reduce your stack of read books; but they don’t have infinite capacity, so not likely to be able to absorb more than a handful of books.

As time goes by, and e-books take off, it’s getting harder and harder to convince book-buyers (customers like myself) to BUY physical books.

Amazon/iBooks is the way of the future, and dead-tree versions of books days are numbered.

#3
addicus12:17 pm, 08 Sep 11

Beaky’s Books in Tuggeranong Hyperdome might be worth a try – 02 62934866

#4
DermottBanana1:36 pm, 08 Sep 11

When I used to hang out in second hand bookstores, and got to know the owners (about 5 years back), I learnt the standard rate was around $1 a book, for example if they were offering someone cash for a deceased reliative’s book collection.

#5
Stevian1:41 pm, 08 Sep 11

excession said :

Gaslight Books out at fyshwick were doing an arrangement where you could ‘trade in’ used books for new ones (for about 20% of the original cost of a book, so a dollar or less a book). That could reduce your stack of read books; but they don’t have infinite capacity, so not likely to be able to absorb more than a handful of books.

As time goes by, and e-books take off, it’s getting harder and harder to convince book-buyers (customers like myself) to BUY physical books.

Amazon/iBooks is the way of the future, and dead-tree versions of books days are numbered.

There not gonna be going anywhere in the near future. Printed books will still be going strong when you’re in de cole cole groun. Let’s see who right? Hint: it’s gonna be me

#6
kezzafezza2:09 pm, 08 Sep 11

Canty’s Bookshop 59-61 Wollongong Street, Fyshwick

You can sell books, or you can get store credit for books and get more $$ worth of credit than cash

#7
poetix3:43 pm, 08 Sep 11

BookLore in Lyneham (next to Tilleys) may be interested. Give them a ring first though.

#8
Deref4:04 pm, 08 Sep 11

Beyond Q in Curtin – best second hand/antiquarian bookshop in Canberra.

#9
Amethyst2:56 am, 09 Sep 11

Any kids books? I’d love to take them off your hands if there are! I’m a pre-service teacher and trying to build up a small library for any future students!

#10
Merle10:04 am, 09 Sep 11

Deref said :

Beyond Q in Curtin – best second hand/antiquarian bookshop in Canberra.

Used to be, back when they were Lawtons. Now, not so much. It’s okay.

#11
MickGeorge1:13 pm, 18 Sep 11

@Amethyst .. I quite a lot of second hand kids books that I would like to sell

#12
Siren4:26 pm, 18 Sep 11

kezzafezza said :

Canty’s Bookshop 59-61 Wollongong Street, Fyshwick

You can sell books, or you can get store credit for books and get more $$ worth of credit than cash

+1. We use these guys frequently.

#13
Henry825:33 pm, 18 Sep 11

If you’re a student, or know a student; chuck them up on ANU classifieds (assuming they’re worth anything). Just watch out for ‘tyre kickers’, from experience the classifieds are notorious for that.

#14
Rusalka7:59 pm, 18 Sep 11

kezzafezza said :

Canty’s Bookshop 59-61 Wollongong Street, Fyshwick

You can sell books, or you can get store credit for books and get more $$ worth of credit than cash

Another huge +1 to this.

I just sold some books there the other day, and it is easily the best second-hand bookshop in Canberra. Not to mention that Luke and his staff are lovely. I don’t go to new bookshops any more since being introduced to them 8+ years ago (not that there are many to go to any more).

#15
Jethro9:29 pm, 18 Sep 11

excession said :

As time goes by, and e-books take off, it’s getting harder and harder to convince book-buyers (customers like myself) to BUY physical books.

Amazon/iBooks is the way of the future, and dead-tree versions of books days are numbered.

Normally I’m all with the whole ‘traditional retail is dead’ crowd. However, a huge chunk of book readers are aesthetes who love books as much for their feel and looks (even smell!), and who will never be able to have that type of relationship with a Kindle. There will always be a market for dead trees.

As evidence of this, I suggest you do a quick google search for ‘bookshelf porn’ (one of the odder subspecies of porn on the interwebz)

Of course, as one of said tree-killing aesthetes I still buy my books online, because, hey, why would I give Dymocks $40 for something bookdepository can give me for $10?

#16
milkman5:44 am, 19 Sep 11

One of the problems I see with e-books is quality. When a book is published in the traditional sense, there is a (generally large) degree of editing and formatting. With e-books, much of this is lost, so the resulting product, unless from a known author, is often not as good.

Time will tell, but I don’t see the printed word disappearing any time soon.

#17
damien haas8:26 am, 19 Sep 11

milkman said :

One of the problems I see with e-books is quality. When a book is published in the traditional sense, there is a (generally large) degree of editing and formatting. With e-books, much of this is lost, so the resulting product, unless from a known author, is often not as good.

Time will tell, but I don’t see the printed word disappearing any time soon.

You are kidding arent you ? I read a lot of books, a real lot. Books published in the last ten or so years are riddled with errors – spelling, grammar, punctuation. The trifecta of editorial responsibility.

i can forgive sloppy plots, middling character development, flaws of logic i could sail the battleship potemkin through – those are the authors fault (although an editor can guide an author out of those problems).

Many of the functions that an editor used to perform are now being ignored or handed back to aspiring authors.

At least a person publishing their own ebook is aware that they alone are the author and editor, and cant rely on ‘the publisher’ to tidy their work for them.

#18
Okwhatever8:50 am, 19 Sep 11

Paper lasts a lot longer than digital media, it is difficult to imaging archeologists digging up a hard disk in 500 years and getting anything useful off it. Relying on electricity to store information is stupid when you consider that natural events can render that system useless ie. coronal mass ejection from the sun or a large impact from an asteroid…. no iPad then matey.

#19
poetix11:24 am, 19 Sep 11

milkman said :

Time will tell, but I don’t see the printed word disappearing any time soon.

There is nothing like holding an actual book, made from dead trees. I just received author copies of my new poetry collection, some of which were published on-line previously in e-zines, as well as in print. For me, knowing that this book will be in the National Library after I’m dead, and in at least a few other people’s hands before that, is the best thing that can happen.

We’ve really dragged this off topic now!

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