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Snake warning!

By 20 September 2012 10

Territory and Municipal Services are warning us to consider matters herpetological:

With the warmer Spring weather almost upon us and snakes emerging from their hibernation, the ACT Government is encouraging Canberrans to be mindful in parks and reserves around the ACT.

“Each year our rangers receive numerous calls concerning snake sightings in the urban areas in and around Canberra. If you do come across a snake the best approach is not to catch or kill them, as harassing the reptile may cause the animal to try and defend itself by striking,” said David Dobroszczyk, Acting Manager, Canberra South District, ACT Parks and Conservation.

“It is also a timely reminder that snakes are a protected species and killing or harming them is an offence under the Nature Conservation Act.

“Ways to discourage snakes from entering your garden include keeping lawns and gardens well-maintained, ensuring pet food and water bowls are not accessible, and keeping compost heaps above the ground to reduce mouse populations (a food source for snakes).

“Also ensure your garden sheds/garages are also cleaned out regularly with materials lifted off the floor to reduce available shelter for snakes. When going for a bushwalk, people should be alert, wear enclosed shoes and avoid walking through long grass. If people encounter a snake they should move away and let it go on its way.

“Eight snake species are known to inhabit the ACT, although only a few of these are likely to be found in suburban gardens, with the Eastern Brown Snake being seen most frequently. The Red-bellied Black Snake is also relatively common, with the Tiger Snake and Copperhead seen only occasionally,” said Mr Dobroszczyk.

A ‘Living with Snakes’ Fact Sheet is available at http://www.tams.act.gov.au or for more information people can contact Canberra Connect on 13 22 81.

woody

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10 Responses to Snake warning!
#1
qbngeek12:14 pm, 20 Sep 12

Someone needs to come out to the archery range at Queanbeyan and tell the Tiger and Copperheads that they should only be seen occasionally. We haven’t seen and blacks or browns in the last few years but there is a health population of Tigers on one side of the range and a healthier polulation of Copperheads on the other.

#2
Rollersk8r4:09 pm, 20 Sep 12

To be filed with reports of Hottest Summer Ever and Worst Bush Fire Season Ever warnings!

#3
Spykler6:18 pm, 20 Sep 12

Rollersk8r said :

To be filed with reports of Hottest Summer Ever and Worst Bush Fire Season Ever warnings!

Or coldest winter in 168 years….until we get a very cold day next year and that will eclipse everything else.

#4
Truthiness8:39 pm, 20 Sep 12

I once met a Canberra lad who kept a kidnapped red belly in his govvy flat as a guard dog. He’d let it out of the tank when he went out drinking to mind the house, but always had a hell of a time finding it when he got home with mates. I didnt know him well, so I just avoided his house, In hindsight I should have reported him for cruelty. I guess i thought he’d sealed his own fate and that I’d see him in the news.

I often wonder what happened to that semi house trained redbelly when I go through Reid

#5
LSWCHP9:15 pm, 20 Sep 12

I met a cocky up near Tumbarumba about 30 years ago. He told me that he never had problems with snakes because he had this terrific gadget called a snake charmer. Being young and gullible I asked to see it, and he pulled out a 12 gauge shotgun. I gather that the idea of the reptile trying to defend itself by striking never bothered him too much.

#6
c_c9:22 pm, 20 Sep 12

Not one mention in that release about keeping vigilant and making sure to be a bit noisy in high risk areas so you don’t step on or startle the snake. Easiest way to avoid trouble is to make sure the snake has decent warning you’re coming and they can move away. Snakes only attack when they panic (after all, we tend to be a bit large for a meal).

#7
wildturkeycanoe10:23 pm, 20 Sep 12

c_c said :

Not one mention in that release about keeping vigilant and making sure to be a bit noisy in high risk areas so you don’t step on or startle the snake. Easiest way to avoid trouble is to make sure the snake has decent warning you’re coming and they can move away. Snakes only attack when they panic (after all, we tend to be a bit large for a meal).

But the backyard pets are a nice meal and while licking it’s lips the snake could be approached by a child. Kids can be noisy but to a snake they might look like something to defend their meal from. I’m thinking about some chicken wire on the perimeter of the block. that should stop ‘em, only as long as the gov can keep the grass on the back fence reserve at ankle deep!

#8
Truthiness11:46 pm, 20 Sep 12

As I understand it, stomping works to scare off some species of snakes, but it can anger the more aggressive species.

I’ve also heard people say snakes don’t like sliding over those big old style fluffy ropes, laying one around your house is supposed to help keep snakes out. Your mileage may vary.

#9
Thumper8:19 am, 21 Sep 12

Truthiness said :

As I understand it, stomping works to scare off some species of snakes, but it can anger the more aggressive species.

I’ve also heard people say snakes don’t like sliding over those big old style fluffy ropes, laying one around your house is supposed to help keep snakes out. Your mileage may vary.

Snakes are generally secretive and apprehensive creatures. They don’t want to confront you as, really, as far they are concerned you are a threat to them. Thus they will generally slither away if given the chance. You’d be surprised by how many snakes you don’t see.

Having said that, some of them, browns and tigers can get quite beligerent and may stand their ground, more so in spring when they are trying to eat as much food as possible after winter hibernation.

A fluffy rope won’t slow one down for an instant.

#10
EvanJames12:11 am, 22 Sep 12

Thumper said :

Having said that, some of them, browns and tigers can get quite beligerent and may stand their ground, more so in spring when they are trying to eat as much food as possible after winter hibernation.

A fluffy rope won’t slow one down for an instant.

Yep, but some black fruit netting on the ground will. Browns (and tigers) are aggressive, truculent mongrels. If you think one’s about, some netting will soon deal with it. Well, it’ll catch it. You have to do the rest.

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