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Solution to Kippax dumping?

By 17 October 2011 24

kippax dumping

Stuart has sent this gem in with this note:

The charity bins at Kippax are treated as nothing more than a cheaper version of the tip by many people. So here’s the Government’s reaction to the problem. Good to see it’s proving so effective…

(it’s nice to see that someone’s thoughtfully made sure to include the remote too!)

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24 Responses to Solution to Kippax dumping?
#1
MERC6001:12 pm, 17 Oct 11

Decent of them to leave the remote with it.

#2
intaba1:18 pm, 17 Oct 11

These stickers have just turned up on the bins at our shops. Except they put them on the back of the bins, only seen by the people walking down from the main road and not the people who pause their car ever so slightly to dump their crap. Not that they should be needed in the first place.

#3
AAMC1:40 pm, 17 Oct 11

Interesting that the thing being dumped are the most expensive items to dispose of at the ACT waste centres.

computer terminal – $15 each
Non-flat panel TV (eg. CRT) screen greater than 54cm diagonally – $40

leaving you crap with the SALVO’s to dispose of – priceless

#4
EvanJames10:48 am, 18 Oct 11

The person leaving the TV and remote clearly thought they were donating it. Why is it so hard to donate working, perfectly good TVs and such things?

#5
p111:09 am, 18 Oct 11

EvanJames said :

The person leaving the TV and remote clearly thought they were donating it. Why is it so hard to donate working, perfectly good TVs and such things?

Sadly, because the cost to the charity of having the appliance tested (which they have to do) is more then they could sell that TV for (even without the inevitable rail/dew/kick it cops outside overnight).

The owner might have tried to give it away first (through freecycle or the like), or they might not have bothered.

#6
troll-sniffer11:23 am, 18 Oct 11

Perhaps, just perhaps, a bout of lateral thinking by the gubmnt would see an end to this anti-social idiocy being foisted on the charity bin surrounds.

Let me see now… puts thinking cap on, switches brain into more than four cells working… the imposition of excessive disposal fees at tips means that a reasonably large percentage of the population prefers to dump at charity bins, so therefore, it’s logical to assume that the placing of ineffectual signs on charity bins is going to solve the problem. I’m a gubmnt genius!!!

What? The signs aren’t working? How could that be. We put a lot of effort into designing and printing those signs… of course they’re going to work. Be patient. As community-minded citizens realise that the risks of getting caught dropping of a TV at the local shops is far greater than the cost of doing the right thing, so people will cease dropping off CRT TVs and monitors.

Actually I think you’ll find that by 2020 the flood of abandoned TVs will have turned into a trickle, proof positive that out signage system works as intended. We live by our new slogan don’t forget: “ACT Gubmnt, Proactive After The Event”.

#7
cubicle0112:03 pm, 18 Oct 11

EvanJames said :

The person leaving the TV and remote clearly thought they were donating it. Why is it so hard to donate working, perfectly good TVs and such things?

/politely
You jest?

This is dumping. Discounting that they might not know TVs arent accepted by charities (unlikely really) its evident that it doesnt fit in the donations box…. so it cannot be donated. This is dumping, just the same as if they had left it in a public reserve.

#8
Deref12:31 pm, 18 Oct 11

Automatic dumper-recognition video cameras triggering high-powered machine guns?

#9
shirty_bear12:40 pm, 18 Oct 11

p1 said :

EvanJames said :

The person leaving the TV and remote clearly thought they were donating it. Why is it so hard to donate working, perfectly good TVs and such things?

Sadly, because the cost to the charity of having the appliance tested (which they have to do) is more then they could sell that TV for

Charities won’t accept CRTs at all, and this is the standard reason given. They can’t even give them away, much less sell them. The poor people seem to have the biggest tellies, pimpedest SUVs and endless durries on hand while us working schlubs watch the old CRT which still works fine and drive a bog-ordinary family truckster.

See http://the-riotact.com/self-awareness-comes-to-west-belconnen/35287

#10
EvanJames2:50 pm, 18 Oct 11

shirty_bear said :

Charities won’t accept CRTs at all, and this is the standard reason given. They can’t even give them away, much less sell them. The poor people seem to have the biggest tellies, pimpedest SUVs and endless durries on hand while us working schlubs watch the old CRT which still works fine and drive a bog-ordinary family truckster.

See http://the-riotact.com/self-awareness-comes-to-west-belconnen/35287

I have a CRT and like it very much! But yeah, the uncharitable thought did occur that people who use charities seem to have very high expectations nowadays… and yet I bet there’s heaps of people out there who’d love any working TV or other stuff.

I have used Freecycle to get rid of perfectly good stuff, and the Freebies bit of AllClassifieds too. I cannot bear to dump perfectly good stuff.

#11
Waiting For Godot3:34 pm, 18 Oct 11

There’s always a lot of dumping at the charity bins in the north carpark at Cooleman Court as well.

#12
OzChick12:34 pm, 19 Oct 11

No improvements today. Someone dumped a heap of furniture including mattresses at the Kippax bins (in front of Aldi) last night. They dump it late at night when no one is around.

#13
bigM12:44 pm, 19 Oct 11

maybe its time to get rid of charity bins…….just a thought

#14
Thumper12:49 pm, 19 Oct 11

bigM said :

maybe its time to get rid of charity bins…….just a thought

Sadly, yes.

#15
Snarky1:07 pm, 19 Oct 11

I’ve said it before – persuade or pay mall owners to allow smaller, more attractively designed clothing donation bins INSIDE a centre and clear it more regularly – like, once or twice a week. I’d have thought it’d be good civic-minded publicity for an owner to offer an under-utilised corner or space to do so.

No bins accept furniture, TVs etc anyway, so positioning them out where douches can dump is simply asking for trouble.

#16
Classified1:17 pm, 19 Oct 11

AAMC said :

Interesting that the thing being dumped are the most expensive items to dispose of at the ACT waste centres.

computer terminal – $15 each
Non-flat panel TV (eg. CRT) screen greater than 54cm diagonally – $40

leaving you crap with the SALVO’s to dispose of – priceless

What?? You mean the govts method of stopping people from doing things by making it really expensive encourages people to do the Wrong Thing? Say it aint so!

#17
Grail2:04 pm, 19 Oct 11

The charity bins in Isabella Plains were taken away some time ago: between the dumping and the vandalism it was just too much for the Salvos and St Vinnies to handle. So no more bins.

I have the good fortune of working very close to a St Vinnies shop, so when I get around to clearing out my old clothing I know where to take it.

#18
Grail2:05 pm, 19 Oct 11

But I’ll hold this uncharitable dumping up as an example of what the “user pays” economy is all about :)

#19
krats8:27 pm, 05 Nov 11
#20
grist9:16 pm, 05 Nov 11

I’m sure this has been brought up before, but I’ll do it again just for the fun of it!

I just got back from a weekend in Melbourne. Whilst there helped my sister move into a new place from her old goup house. After she’d moved and the remaining residents took stock of the place there was quite a bit of unwanted furniture, including mattresses which had been left by other past residents.

Lucky Melbournites have a council pickup a couple of times a year. Whilst I realise this must cost a bit – both in the provision of the service and in foregone tip fees – the benefit to the locals and to the charities working amongst them must be enourmous.

The temptation to make a midnight rubbish-run to a local charity bin tempered somewhat by the knowledge that there will likely be an opportunity to get rid of your junk in a few months. #jussayin’

#21
Jethro9:41 pm, 05 Nov 11

grist said :

I’m sure this has been brought up before, but I’ll do it again just for the fun of it!

I just got back from a weekend in Melbourne. Whilst there helped my sister move into a new place from her old goup house. After she’d moved and the remaining residents took stock of the place there was quite a bit of unwanted furniture, including mattresses which had been left by other past residents.

Lucky Melbournites have a council pickup a couple of times a year. Whilst I realise this must cost a bit – both in the provision of the service and in foregone tip fees – the benefit to the locals and to the charities working amongst them must be enourmous.

The temptation to make a midnight rubbish-run to a local charity bin tempered somewhat by the knowledge that there will likely be an opportunity to get rid of your junk in a few months. #jussayin’

I agree with you on the curbside pickups. Brissie does them twice a year, plus you get sent a few free vouchers for the tip a couple of times a year. Far less illegal dumping is the result. (Also, it is great for uni students and other assorted bogans to score a free couch.

Although, if you do decide to illegally dump I don’t see why you feel the need to leave it outside a charity bin and thereby force a charity to spend the money to remove your trash.

#22
Wanda11:32 pm, 05 Nov 11

Since its 2011, one can only assume Canberra is no longer supposedly aspiring to no land fill by 2010. Why cant we have a sensible hard garbage service, like the rest of Australia?? Guess we dont have councils to ensure pragmatic approach to dealing with reality of garbage?? Or possibly ACT Goverment & connected individuals have shares in skip bin business, amazing hike in prices, strangely akin to ACTEWAGL…..

#23
grist12:08 am, 06 Nov 11

Jethro said :

grist said :

I agree with you on the curbside pickups. Brissie does them twice a year, plus you get sent a few free vouchers for the tip a couple of times a year. Far less illegal dumping is the result. (Also, it is great for uni students and other assorted bogans to score a free couch..

Yeah, we moved a couch that she’d picked up from out the front of someone’s house some years ago too. Since she is has now joined the mortgage-paying, shop-bought-furniture-owning set with the rest of us, that will soon be left out the front of her new place for the next generation of uni students to camp on. Long live recycling (and the couch)

#24
krats7:00 am, 06 Nov 11

Jethro said :

grist said :

I’m sure this has been brought up before, but I’ll do it again just for the fun of it!

I just got back from a weekend in Melbourne. Whilst there helped my sister move into a new place from her old goup house. After she’d moved and the remaining residents took stock of the place there was quite a bit of unwanted furniture, including mattresses which had been left by other past residents.

Lucky Melbournites have a council pickup a couple of times a year. Whilst I realise this must cost a bit – both in the provision of the service and in foregone tip fees – the benefit to the locals and to the charities working amongst them must be enourmous.

The temptation to make a midnight rubbish-run to a local charity bin tempered somewhat by the knowledge that there will likely be an opportunity to get rid of your junk in a few months. #jussayin’

I agree with you on the curbside pickups. Brissie does them twice a year, plus you get sent a few free vouchers for the tip a couple of times a year. Far less illegal dumping is the result. (Also, it is great for uni students and other assorted bogans to score a free couch.

Although, if you do decide to illegally dump I don’t see why you feel the need to leave it outside a charity bin and thereby force a charity to spend the money to remove your trash.

Even Queanbeyan Has Council Clean Up Days,And I Might Add, Green Waste Bins.

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