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The empire strikes back at the Gungahlin Priceline

By 20 April 2013 9

gungahlin

BJ has sent this one in:

As seen in the window of Priceline Gungahlin.

Globalisation, I know, but how hard is it to change a couple of letters?

Cheers,

BJ

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9 Responses to The empire strikes back at the Gungahlin Priceline
#1
Grrrr1:01 pm, 20 Apr 13

For those of us who neither shop at Priceline and haven’t had a prescription filled for years, perhaps you might like to explain teh funnies.

I’m guessing NHS is meant to read PBS, but I’m not 100% sure…

#2
JC1:27 pm, 20 Apr 13

If it was say Boots, a UK pharmacy company than yes I could handle a mistake due to globalisation. But Priceline is an Aussie company owned by another Aussie company that only operates in Australia. So how could they get that sooooo wrong?

#3
bundah2:05 pm, 20 Apr 13

Hmm someone with a wicked sense of humour or merely clueless?

#4
rosscoact4:40 pm, 20 Apr 13

So, does legislation prohibit discount of PBS subsidised prescriptions?

#5
Deref4:45 pm, 20 Apr 13

JC said :

If it was say Boots, a UK pharmacy company than yes I could handle a mistake due to globalisation. But Priceline is an Aussie company owned by another Aussie company that only operates in Australia. So how could they get that sooooo wrong?

Jezuz – if they can’t even get that right, what kind of confidence can you have in their products?

#6
poppy5:29 pm, 20 Apr 13

I noticed this a long time ago too… a bit weird how they haven’t noticed and corrected it by now, however it happened? That said, Gungahlin priceline has the cheapest prices I’ve found on some items. One regular script I get there costs me only $6 but it’s $16 at other pharmacies (including another priceline I went to once assuming it would be the same price, to my regret). There are a couple of other things there that are also much cheaper than anywhere else I have found, whilst other products have identical prices. One over the counter product I buy there a lot, I noticed seemed to be cheaper because they don’t charge GST on it according to the receipt. I’ve been to many other pharmacies to buy this and they have charged me GST on it. Either it’s a mistake, or there is some confusion about the GST laws (did seem very unfair to me to pay GST on it, it’s for a medical condition not cosmetics or body lotion or something like that!) Anyway, whilst these price differences last I will continue to shop at this priceline despite their stupid sign.

#7
peitab8:29 pm, 20 Apr 13

I’ve noticed that baby boomers and older generations tend to use ‘NHS’ instead of ‘PBS’, even in business-based correspondence (where you’d think it would actually be right). I’ll bet good money that a baby boomer was responsible for either writing or approving this sign at the Priceline corporate office.

Chemist Warehouse in Woden used ‘NHS’ in their signage when they first opened, but as I haven’t been there in years, I’m not sure if it’s still being used.

#8
EvanJames8:55 pm, 20 Apr 13

Not entirely sure how all this works, all I know is, when I get presciption drugs at the discount chemist place at brand depot, they are cheaper than if I get those prescriptions filled at Priceline Queanbeyan.

#9
JC8:10 am, 21 Apr 13

EvanJames said :

Not entirely sure how all this works, all I know is, when I get presciption drugs at the discount chemist place at brand depot, they are cheaper than if I get those prescriptions filled at Priceline Queanbeyan.

Easy to explain actually. Not all PBS drugs are subsidised. If the drug is subsidised then you, the customer will pay the PBS list price of around $36 and the government pays the rest. If the drug is not subsidised because it’s trust cost is under $36 then you the customer are paying the full price of that drug plus of course chemist mark up.

The above applies to those that pay full rate. If you have a concession/health care card/safety net etc, then the price you pay will be lower anyway meaning a drug not subsidised for a full payer may well be subsidised for you.

Now before “discount chemists” came on the scene if your prescription drug was under $36 then more often than not the chemist would happily charge you $36 even if the true cost was say $20. All the discount chemists are doing is charging you the correct price, though I do note that even traditional chemists are now charging a little less for non subsidised drugs. For example I got something the other day at Souls in Kippax for around $30, though I normally get it at discount chemist for $23. The other medicine I take is full price regardless of where I go.

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