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Tidbinbilla serves Kangaroo meat at their cafe.

By 12 December 2012 126

Over the weekend myself and an interstate friend went to Tidbbinbilla for a lovely day with the kangaroos and wildlife. Afterwards we decided to stop off at the new cafe they have there for lunch. You can imagine our shock and horror when we saw grilled kangaroo fillet and kangaroo sausages on menu. Kangaroos are one of the main attractions at Tidbinbilla, what message are we sending to visitors if we offer our native animal up for lunch. Spend the day with the kangaroos then come and eat them for lunch served along side Native Bush Tomatoes, wtf?.

Although I probably shouldn’t be suprised, this is canberra after all.

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126 Responses to Tidbinbilla serves Kangaroo meat at their cafe.
#61
Henry826:56 pm, 12 Dec 12

Kangaroos are actually overpopulating Canberra. Why do you think we cull them every year?

#62
threepaws7:08 pm, 12 Dec 12

crappicker said :

As someone who loves to see kangaroos hopping around, I hate to see them slaughtered for mass consumption. To offer kangaroo meat on the menu at, of all places, the Tidbinbilla cafe, seems a serious misjudgement by management.

I like to see lambs frolicking in spring and cows grazing in a paddock too. Unless you are in fact vegetarian or vegan, then your comment is ridiculously hypocritical.

If kangaroos bred for consumption gets your back up, then you really need to investigate where the rest of your meat comes from, then start putting your money where your mouth is and shop humane.

#63
threepaws7:29 pm, 12 Dec 12

zorro29 said :

lol there is actually a kangaroo picture on the menu…

actually seems like a great showcase of local and unique flavours and produce

Brush-tailed rock wallaby, a critically endangered species… hopefully not on the menu :)

But seriously, they have a fantastic breeding program for these critters there.

#64
Instant Mash9:45 pm, 12 Dec 12

All this did was get me seriously hungry for some skippy… Thanks, OP.

Might have to check that place out.

#65
Pandy10:58 pm, 12 Dec 12

Pork Hunt said :

I wonder if any Actors Riot are aware of a country/province/state with beavers on their coat of arms? I’d eat beaver…

I choked!!

But to answer your question: Toronto

#66
Conan of Cooma7:42 am, 13 Dec 12

Instant Mash said :

All this did was get me seriously hungry for some skippy… Thanks, OP.

Might have to check that place out.

The vac packed steaks you can get from Woolies are pretty darn good.

#67
watto239:40 am, 13 Dec 12

I always ask the vegans, how can they assure me that their vegetables were farmed in a responsible manner and not from land resulting from cut down rainforest or from farms employing cheap child labour :-)

#68
neanderthalsis9:51 am, 13 Dec 12

On a side note, anyone know where I can pick up some bush tomatoes? Some grilled roo with lemon myrtle seasoning and a rocket and bush tomato salad would make a great summer lunch.

#69
devils_advocate10:49 am, 13 Dec 12

bigfeet said :

LSWCHP said :

Watson said :

Indeed. I’m a member at Tidbinbilla, but haven’t been there for a few months. I might head out there for a walk and a bit of roo on the weekend. Is the place licensed at all? BYO?

No reason to BYO…there’s enough roos out there for everyone.

they should serve the roo with a nose tag in.

#70
Baldy12:17 pm, 13 Dec 12

troll-sniffer said :

Invited by vegetarians for dinner? Point out that since you’d no doubt be made aware of their special dietary requirements, tell them about yours, and ask for a nice steak.

Hmm. I like this idea. I’ll try it next time I go to a vego’s house.

#71
Aaroncbr12:59 pm, 13 Dec 12

watto23 said :

I always ask the vegans, how can they assure me that their vegetables were farmed in a responsible manner and not from land resulting from cut down rainforest or from farms employing cheap child labour :-)

Buy organic/Australian.
Ask the someone who works at your grocer where it comes from, then research based on their answer.
Grow your own.

Pretty easy really.

#72
MissChief1:15 pm, 13 Dec 12

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

#73
Gungahlin Al1:19 pm, 13 Dec 12

The OP has done a mighty fine job of promoting the cafe, and particularly this meal. How many people are now considering roo salad at Tidbinbilla over the break? I know I am.
#outragefail

Aslo nice to know that the ACT will be able to put those culled roos to good use now…

#74
NoImRight1:28 pm, 13 Dec 12

“Shock and horror”? You are fragile. Roos arent exactly endangered. Why not eat them?

Stop the “its Canberra” crap too. You can get roo steaks all over Australia.

#75
Lillypilly1:29 pm, 13 Dec 12

MissChief said :

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

A sanctuary of kangaroos? I must have missed the news where it’s now an issue that roos in this region have suddenly become near extinct…

Your faux outrage is showing.

#76
DrKoresh1:40 pm, 13 Dec 12

MissChief said :

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

Grow up MissChief. Calling it a ‘sanctuary’ implies that roos are somehow threatened which they are clearly NOT in anyone’s opinion (and if you disagree then your opinion is plainly, objectively wrong).
I’d also like to know how it’s inappropriate to serve kangaroo meat where you have an abundance of roos, can you explain it for me?

#77
poetix2:35 pm, 13 Dec 12

Come on peeps, this is getting cruel. Not to the roos, so much as to OP.

Surely he didn’t expect such a release of buzzing, meaty flies when he opened Pandora’s pouch? Which is a horrible image, isn’t it, Skip. Skip? Skip?

Which one of you rendered her marsoupial?

#78
MissChief11:31 pm, 13 Dec 12

DrKoresh said :

MissChief said :

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

Grow up MissChief. Calling it a ‘sanctuary’ implies that roos are somehow threatened which they are clearly NOT in anyone’s opinion (and if you disagree then your opinion is plainly, objectively wrong).
I’d also like to know how it’s inappropriate to serve kangaroo meat where you have an abundance of roos, can you explain it for me?

What? LOL. No it doesn’t. I’ve said nothing at all against eating kangaroo and I’ve already explained the gist of the article. Why don’t you do some fact finding yourself. Start with looking up the meaning of sanctuary and then go and read the Tidbinbilla website.

“The Sanctuary at Tidbinbilla offers fabulous nature based experiences and a great way to discover our natural world. A large wetlands ecosystem surrounded by bushland and protected by a predator-proof fence provides sanctuary for a range of native animals in a natural setting.”

#79
MissChief11:37 pm, 13 Dec 12

Lillypilly said :

MissChief said :

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

A sanctuary of kangaroos? I must have missed the news where it’s now an issue that roos in this region have suddenly become near extinct…

Your faux outrage is showing.

Again with the endangered/extinct argument? DrKoresh? Troll?

#80
Gungahlin Al10:16 am, 14 Dec 12

MissChief and OP: any closed ecosystem will likely be subject to population imbalances, requiring correction by the stewards. The feral-fenced sections of Tidbinbilla would be no different, with the rangers having to boot out excess numbers of certain species from time to time to prevent starvation.

Similarly, the reserves and farmlands we have created all around us create ideal breeding environments for certain species (like roos and Noisy Miners), usually to the detriment of other species, and eventually to the detriment of those species themselves as they reach resource tipping points.

A critical part of good stewardship of rural and reserve lands with “soft” barriers to movement is recognising and acting on such human-induced population imbalances where they occur, in order to minimise effects on other species and ultimately cruelty to those populations themselves. Hence the regretable need for culling.

The introduction of native species on menus at such sites opens up the possibility of dialogue and education around such issues and hopefully some acceptance of what can only ever be a lesser of two evils situation. It also opens up discussion about the values of growing markets and acceptance of our own species as commercially viable, especially given the environmental effects of growing and harvesting native species are far better than for the introduced species we currently favour. We’ll never replace them, but reduced reliance on ruminants and hard-hoofed livestock would help enormously in areas of emissions, soil erosion, soil compaction, nutrient runoff, algael blooms, etc.

In my opinion, these are important public education topics, and fit well with the conservation edict of the Tidbinbilla sanctuary.

#81
imarty10:35 am, 14 Dec 12

Gungahlin Al said :

MissChief and OP: any closed ecosystem will likely be subject to population imbalances, requiring correction by the stewards. The feral-fenced sections of Tidbinbilla would be no different, with the rangers having to boot out excess numbers of certain species from time to time to prevent starvation.

Similarly, the reserves and farmlands we have created all around us create ideal breeding environments for certain species (like roos and Noisy Miners), usually to the detriment of other species, and eventually to the detriment of those species themselves as they reach resource tipping points.

A critical part of good stewardship of rural and reserve lands with “soft” barriers to movement is recognising and acting on such human-induced population imbalances where they occur, in order to minimise effects on other species and ultimately cruelty to those populations themselves. Hence the regretable need for culling.

The introduction of native species on menus at such sites opens up the possibility of dialogue and education around such issues and hopefully some acceptance of what can only ever be a lesser of two evils situation. It also opens up discussion about the values of growing markets and acceptance of our own species as commercially viable, especially given the environmental effects of growing and harvesting native species are far better than for the introduced species we currently favour. We’ll never replace them, but reduced reliance on ruminants and hard-hoofed livestock would help enormously in areas of emissions, soil erosion, soil compaction, nutrient runoff, algael blooms, etc.

In my opinion, these are important public education topics, and fit well with the conservation edict of the Tidbinbilla sanctuary.

Gungahlin Al, this thread has no place for balanced, well thought out logical arguments…

#82
Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd11:33 am, 14 Dec 12

MissChief said :

DrKoresh said :

MissChief said :

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

Grow up MissChief. Calling it a ‘sanctuary’ implies that roos are somehow threatened which they are clearly NOT in anyone’s opinion (and if you disagree then your opinion is plainly, objectively wrong).
I’d also like to know how it’s inappropriate to serve kangaroo meat where you have an abundance of roos, can you explain it for me?

What? LOL. No it doesn’t. I’ve said nothing at all against eating kangaroo and I’ve already explained the gist of the article. Why don’t you do some fact finding yourself. Start with looking up the meaning of sanctuary and then go and read the Tidbinbilla website.

“The Sanctuary at Tidbinbilla offers fabulous nature based experiences and a great way to discover our natural world. A large wetlands ecosystem surrounded by bushland and protected by a predator-proof fence provides sanctuary for a range of native animals in a natural setting.”

I go there quite a bit and have never seen a roo in the actual sanctuary. They are in abundance every where else though.

#83
watto2311:38 am, 14 Dec 12

MissChief said :

DrKoresh said :

MissChief said :

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

Grow up MissChief. Calling it a ‘sanctuary’ implies that roos are somehow threatened which they are clearly NOT in anyone’s opinion (and if you disagree then your opinion is plainly, objectively wrong).
I’d also like to know how it’s inappropriate to serve kangaroo meat where you have an abundance of roos, can you explain it for me?

What? LOL. No it doesn’t. I’ve said nothing at all against eating kangaroo and I’ve already explained the gist of the article. Why don’t you do some fact finding yourself. Start with looking up the meaning of sanctuary and then go and read the Tidbinbilla website.

“The Sanctuary at Tidbinbilla offers fabulous nature based experiences and a great way to discover our natural world. A large wetlands ecosystem surrounded by bushland and protected by a predator-proof fence provides sanctuary for a range of native animals in a natural setting.”

So I guess any restaurant on a farm, should stop serving meat from the farm as well?
What about a restaurant that overlooks a marine sanctuary and serves fish/seafood.

As long as its all sustainable its fine by most people. The OP has made a tenuous link that most rational people can understand the differences between whats on show and whats to eat.

#84
Postalgeek12:01 pm, 14 Dec 12

DrKoresh said :

MissChief said :

Grow up people. The article is clearly NOT about eating kangaroo meat but about the appropriateness of serving kangaroo at a sanctuary for kangaroos.

Grow up MissChief. Calling it a ‘sanctuary’ implies that roos are somehow threatened which they are clearly NOT in anyone’s opinion (and if you disagree then your opinion is plainly, objectively wrong).
I’d also like to know how it’s inappropriate to serve kangaroo meat where you have an abundance of roos, can you explain it for me?

There is an area of Tidbinbilla specifically called The Sanctuary. I don’t know if they have kangaroos in that particular area, but Tidbinbilla in general is a Nature Reserve.

Look the definition of ‘sanctuary’ up in a dictionary and you’ll probably see nature reserve, but you won’t find any mention of ‘sanctuary’ meaning a place for species close to extinction. A sanctuary is a protected area. People, numbering in the billions, use sanctuaries.

I like eating kangaroo and emu on the odd occasion. I’m not phased by kangaroo being served in the restaurant, but I can understand why some people might question the appropriateness of serving up denizens of a sanctuary next door in the restaurant. The OPs supercilious language did neither him or his cause any favours.

#85
Ben_Dover1:04 pm, 14 Dec 12

Should restaurants in vineyards not serve wine?

“Won’t someone think of the poor little grapes!”

#86
LSWCHP7:13 pm, 14 Dec 12

Gungahlin Al said :

MissChief and OP: any closed ecosystem will likely be subject to population imbalances, requiring correction by the stewards. The feral-fenced sections of Tidbinbilla would be no different, with the rangers having to boot out excess numbers of certain species from time to time to prevent starvation.

Nice work Al. That’s one of the most thoughtful things I’ve ever seen here.

#87
FreddyVegan1:06 pm, 26 Dec 12

Putting aside the unnecessary murder of a beautiful innocent animal, to consume kangaroo meat is disgusting. The thought of someone eating kangaroo flesh makes me feel incredibly ill. I encourage you all to do some research into eating kangaroo meat before you talk about how healthy it is.

http://www.kangaroo-protection-coalition.com/eatkangaroomeat.html

However judging by some of the responses here I wouldn’t be all that surprised if a bit of fecal material and urine mixed in with your meat bothered you. The level of ignorance shown by a majority of the people posting here is very troubling.

#88
Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd1:20 pm, 26 Dec 12

FreddyVegan said :

Putting aside the unnecessary murder of a beautiful innocent animal, to consume kangaroo meat is disgusting. The thought of someone eating kangaroo flesh makes me feel incredibly ill. I encourage you all to do some research into eating kangaroo meat before you talk about how healthy it is.

http://www.kangaroo-protection-coalition.com/eatkangaroomeat.html

However judging by some of the responses here I wouldn’t be all that surprised if a bit of fecal material and urine mixed in with your meat bothered you. The level of ignorance shown by a majority of the people posting here is very troubling.

I think ou need to check your own ignorance before commenting on others.

#89
Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd1:25 pm, 26 Dec 12

FreddyVegan said :

Putting aside the unnecessary murder of a beautiful innocent animal, to consume kangaroo meat is disgusting. The thought of someone eating kangaroo flesh makes me feel incredibly ill. I encourage you all to do some research into eating kangaroo meat before you talk about how healthy it is.

http://www.kangaroo-protection-coalition.com/eatkangaroomeat.html

However judging by some of the responses here I wouldn’t be all that surprised if a bit of fecal material and urine mixed in with your meat bothered you. The level of ignorance shown by a majority of the people posting here is very troubling.

Oh wow lololololll I took the plunge and checked your link. I like how none of it is sourced. I like how the *ecoli* pics are some of the worst shopped pics I ever seen and I like how no pic is in perspective, it just random close up pics. Could you be any more desperate to promote your ridiculous cause, freddy vegan?

#90
FreddyVegan1:56 pm, 26 Dec 12

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

FreddyVegan said :

Putting aside the unnecessary murder of a beautiful innocent animal, to consume kangaroo meat is disgusting. The thought of someone eating kangaroo flesh makes me feel incredibly ill. I encourage you all to do some research into eating kangaroo meat before you talk about how healthy it is.

http://www.kangaroo-protection-coalition.com/eatkangaroomeat.html

However judging by some of the responses here I wouldn’t be all that surprised if a bit of fecal material and urine mixed in with your meat bothered you. The level of ignorance shown by a majority of the people posting here is very troubling.

Oh wow lololololll I took the plunge and checked your link. I like how none of it is sourced. I like how the *ecoli* pics are some of the worst shopped pics I ever seen and I like how no pic is in perspective, it just random close up pics. Could you be any more desperate to promote your ridiculous cause, freddy vegan?

I understand sometimes it can be very confronting to see the truth, becoming defensive is a common reaction.I hope in time you will realise the ethical and health issues associated with consuming kangaroo meat, and all meat for that matter :)

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