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Watt’s the answer

By 28 September 2012 246

watts

My name is Matt Watts and I am a Liberal Candidate for Ginninderra in the October 20 Assembly election.

Regular readers would know me as the first candidate to donate Lego and participate in the RiotACT’s Candidate Lego Challenge (link). You may also have seen me at a shopping centre or at your front door, spreading the word that I’d be an effective local MLA.

I asked the RiotACT team to leave the comments functionality switched on so that we can have an open dialogue. The RiotACT team advised me that they’ll have to moderate anything that’s off-topic, yet I’m happy to answer general questions about my beliefs, background, policies, etc.

If you want the official Canberra Liberals policies, head here. Now – about me:

I was born in Sydney. My mum’s a teacher and my dad was trained as an electrical engineer, starting his career at the Sydney County Council before a couple of moves to now work for Boral. One grandfather was a plumber, and the other grandfather was a manager at Sunbeam back when they made quality products in Australia. I mention this background to enforce that, whilst I am an established public servant, and proud of the service I have performed for the community through my work, I wasn’t spawned within the APS bio-dome.
I joined the Department of Immigration as an APS 1 in 1999, straight after completing my HSC, with a view to supporting my studies via the APS. I commenced a Bachelor of Arts at Sydney Uni in 2000, with which I was mightily unimpressed (and it me, probably), so I soon got over that distraction and stayed with Immigration. I moved to Canberra in 2003.

I was involved in Immigration’s response to the Palmer and Comrie reports and, with my interest in administrative matters piqued, I resumed study and obtained my Master’s in Public Policy (specialising in social policy) from the ANU.

Work has taken me on deployments to remote areas; most recently I spent six months as a director on Christmas Island. I haven’t travelled much, but I enjoy experiencing new environments. My first overseas trip took me to Canberra’s Friendship City, Dili, and I was amazed at certain correlations between our two cities!

I am a Hash House Harrier, both locally and whenever I travel. It keeps me relatively fit and I’ve met people of really diverse backgrounds. I also enjoy reading widely including history, magazines on current affairs and comics, supporting live local music, whisky tasting, walking (which is handy because I’ve never had a driver’s license), reading and TV shows like Doctor Who.

At various levels over the years I’ve been a member of the Belconnen Community Council, the Australian Privacy Foundation, Neighbourhood Watch, the Australian Institute of Administrative Law, the Institute of Public Administration Australia, ACT Light Rail, Music ACT, Friends of the (Australian War) Memorial and Electronic Frontiers Australia. I was even involved in the CPSU at one stage. I’m also a Justice of the Peace. Being involved in my community is important to me.

I’ve been a member of the Liberal Party since I was sixteen because I’ve never liked the nanny state. I ran as a candidate for Ginninderra in 2008 and as Senator Humphries’ running mate in 2010 (I am likely to have been a Senator if I didn’t save Gaz from the path of a speeding van as we were crossing Northbourne Ave!).

I am especially interested in improved local service delivery, planning and infrastructure, liquor licensing, higher quality community consultation and strengthening the quality of public administration within the ACT Government, particularly with regards to unintended consequences. For example, the feel-good plastic bag “ban” has led to more non-biodegradable bag use in landfill and increased litter in our streets; government intervention is rarely a panacea. Government should serve the Canberra community more than it tries to socially engineer it.

If you want to meet me in person, I will be at the October Hall Markets in the afternoon, and I am at the Jamison “Trash and Treasure” every Sunday morning until the election.

Over to you…!

[authorised by stephen doyle - liberal party canberra]

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246 Responses to Watt’s the answer
#211
Matt_Watts11:52 am, 23 Oct 12

Duffbowl said :

Matt_Watts said :

Duffbowl said :

Matt_Watts said :

Duffbowl said :

Matt_Watts said :

I’m sure they have some rules… Do you have ready access them? Cheers.

Answered like a true politician: don’t bring me problems, bring me solutions!

Solutions focussed, mate. Happy to look at it.

Effluent of a similar ilk, conveyed in an open-top container that differs from the previous one.

Come on Duffbowl, there’s no need for that. Why can’t a candidate openly say he doesn’t know the detail about a particular policy (in this case, a policy from Melbourne), and ask for more info about it?

Fair call, and I’ll wear that one. My cynicism stems from your use of a phrase that was all too familiar when I worked in a certain department.

Understandable… One thing I’ve noticed especially in this forum is that if you say something as a politician, there’s a certain automatic level of cynicism from punters. I’ve made comments here in a personal capacity previously (different name – have had it for years) and the the responses are quite different!

#212
rosscoact1:04 pm, 23 Oct 12

Matt,

bad luck, you fought the good fight. My leanings are just left of centre and yours appear to be just right of centre and in conversation we are in agreement more that we are at odds.

I’m sorry you didn’t get a spot, you would make a great MLA I’m sure.

So, what’s next?

#213
Diggety1:32 pm, 23 Oct 12

Matt_Watts said :

FioBla said :

You might win the Mully Cup.

I think I missed out to Pocock, dammit.

(and a shame the LDP aren’t smashing him)

+1

#214
Matt_Watts2:11 pm, 23 Oct 12

rosscoact said :

Matt,

bad luck, you fought the good fight. My leanings are just left of centre and yours appear to be just right of centre and in conversation we are in agreement more that we are at odds.

I’m sorry you didn’t get a spot, you would make a great MLA I’m sure.

So, what’s next?

Cheers. I’ll be back to work, like a normal person!

#215
DrKoresh12:30 pm, 27 Oct 12

Masquara said :

HenryBG said :

What’s the @$%^#en story? You’re not a denier are you, Matt? It’s a simple enough question, and the answer has been known to science for about 180 years, so what’s your story?

Anyone who uses the term “climate change denier” is no supporter of science.

Get real Masquara, anyone who still claims the evidence for climate change is inconclusive is no supporter of science. They are in denial of the science which makes them deniers, so I’d like to see the “logic” behind your statement.

#216
HenryBG1:37 pm, 27 Oct 12

DrKoresh said :

Masquara said :

HenryBG said :

What’s the @$%^#en story? You’re not a denier are you, Matt? It’s a simple enough question, and the answer has been known to science for about 180 years, so what’s your story?

Anyone who uses the term “climate change denier” is no supporter of science.

Get real Masquara, anyone who still claims the evidence for climate change is inconclusive is no supporter of science. They are in denial of the science which makes them deniers, so I’d like to see the “logic” behind your statement.

I would’ve voted Liberal is Watts hadn’t woken me up to the fact that Abbott & Minchin are not exceptions within that Party.

Maybe when the Libs throw out the retards and join the rest of us in the 21st Century I’ll consider voting for them.

There are pretty much only 3 countries outside the ex-soviet world where climate denialism still has any credibility: The USA, Canada, Australia. The rest of the world has moved on. The Tories in the UK have introduced carbon pricing. Scandinavia started implementing carbon pricing almost 30 years ago. Australia has never had much credibility in the global intellectual stakes (some notable exports notwithstanding) and this climate-denialism which is such a feature of Australian society at the moment, being a core belief of one of our two major political parties, makes as look like a bunch of dunces.

#217
Matt_Watts9:58 pm, 30 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

DrKoresh said :

Masquara said :

HenryBG said :

What’s the @$%^#en story? You’re not a denier are you, Matt? It’s a simple enough question, and the answer has been known to science for about 180 years, so what’s your story?

Anyone who uses the term “climate change denier” is no supporter of science.

Get real Masquara, anyone who still claims the evidence for climate change is inconclusive is no supporter of science. They are in denial of the science which makes them deniers, so I’d like to see the “logic” behind your statement.

I would’ve voted Liberal is Watts hadn’t woken me up to the fact that Abbott & Minchin are not exceptions within that Party.

Maybe when the Libs throw out the retards and join the rest of us in the 21st Century I’ll consider voting for them.

There are pretty much only 3 countries outside the ex-soviet world where climate denialism still has any credibility: The USA, Canada, Australia. The rest of the world has moved on. The Tories in the UK have introduced carbon pricing. Scandinavia started implementing carbon pricing almost 30 years ago. Australia has never had much credibility in the global intellectual stakes (some notable exports notwithstanding) and this climate-denialism which is such a feature of Australian society at the moment, being a core belief of one of our two major political parties, makes as look like a bunch of dunces.

Well, I’m sorry you feel that way, as I clearly stated that humans have made a significant impact on climate change.

I don’t think the term climate change denier is useful, though. Climate change has always existed. I would simply like the debate to move beyond the name calling.

If you want to maintain the ideological divide, rather than focus on outcomes, that’s your choice.

#218
HenryBG6:54 am, 31 Oct 12

Matt_Watts said :

If you want to maintain the ideological divide, rather than focus on outcomes, that’s your choice.

This would be the ideological divide between those who accept reality and those who believe what they read in The Australian, right?

Tony Abbott himself said, “Climate Change is crap”. A very clear-cut case of denial – the word ‘denial’ being the technical term for somebody who rejects reality and the most apt way to describe his views.

Your views don’t appear much better: “Climate Change has always existed”. What’s that got to do with anything?
When a friend says, “my doctor says I have cancer”, do you give him, “Cancer has always existed”?
How does this red herring “focus on outcomes”?
Answer: it doesn’t. Like anybody with an untenable ideeology, you contradict yourself.

The science (not the ideology) says that a doubling of CO2 will result in around 3 degrees of warming. This is up there with the planet’s previous mass-extinction events.
We’re already 40% of the way to that doubling now.

#219
Matt_Watts9:02 am, 31 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

Matt_Watts said :

If you want to maintain the ideological divide, rather than focus on outcomes, that’s your choice.

This would be the ideological divide between those who accept reality and those who believe what they read in The Australian, right?

Tony Abbott himself said, “Climate Change is crap”. A very clear-cut case of denial – the word ‘denial’ being the technical term for somebody who rejects reality and the most apt way to describe his views.

Your views don’t appear much better: “Climate Change has always existed”. What’s that got to do with anything?
When a friend says, “my doctor says I have cancer”, do you give him, “Cancer has always existed”?
How does this red herring “focus on outcomes”?
Answer: it doesn’t. Like anybody with an untenable ideeology, you contradict yourself.

The science (not the ideology) says that a doubling of CO2 will result in around 3 degrees of warming. This is up there with the planet’s previous mass-extinction events.
We’re already 40% of the way to that doubling now.

He actually said that the debate was absolute crap, if I recall correctly, and the fact I can’t point out a simple fact that climate change has always existed whilst also stating that HUMANS HAVE MADE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT and still be attacked as a “denier” leads me to suspect he may have been onto something :)

#220
thebadtouch9:18 am, 31 Oct 12

Matt, your 15 minutes of fame have passed. Let it go and move on. This thread has become redundant!

#221
bundah9:44 am, 31 Oct 12

thebadtouch said :

Matt, your 15 minutes of fame have passed. Let it go and move on. This thread has become redundant!

Milk it matt,and who knows there could be a cup coming your way!

#222
Thumper9:54 am, 31 Oct 12

thebadtouch said :

Matt, your 15 minutes of fame have passed. Let it go and move on. This thread has become redundant!

Federal election coming up next year. One of the local libs may jump ship.

#223
maxblues12:06 pm, 31 Oct 12

thebadtouch said :

Matt, your 15 minutes of fame have passed. Let it go and move on. This thread has become redundant!

If the Greens are forming sub-committees of non-elected peeps to help Ratso do his thinking, then maybe there is yet a role for Matt to play in the political process…like start an inquiry into why so many bottleshops are closing since the introduction of the carbon tax…Candamber has closed its Bunda St shop, Cox Kelly seem to have closed their doors and I hear the bottleshops next to LJ Hooker at Kippax is set to close. The electricity bill for your average bottleshops is around $2000 A MONTH (more in some cases) this in unsustainable and I think we will even see Woolworths close one of its BWS stores at Dickson after Christmas.
Most of us enjoy a cold frothy but if something isn’t done about runaway power prices we will end up drinking hot ales POMMY style…blech!

#224
Matt_Watts12:42 pm, 31 Oct 12

maxblues said :

thebadtouch said :

Matt, your 15 minutes of fame have passed. Let it go and move on. This thread has become redundant!

If the Greens are forming sub-committees of non-elected peeps to help Ratso do his thinking, then maybe there is yet a role for Matt to play in the political process…like start an inquiry into why so many bottleshops are closing since the introduction of the carbon tax…Candamber has closed its Bunda St shop, Cox Kelly seem to have closed their doors and I hear the bottleshops next to LJ Hooker at Kippax is set to close. The electricity bill for your average bottleshops is around $2000 A MONTH (more in some cases) this in unsustainable and I think we will even see Woolworths close one of its BWS stores at Dickson after Christmas.
Most of us enjoy a cold frothy but if something isn’t done about runaway power prices we will end up drinking hot ales POMMY style…blech!

That’s worse news than you’d think… Many small on-license venues purchase certain products from bottle-Os… think bottles of scotch, etc. Those drink at home and at venues are affected.

The thing is, I was involved in issues before the election, and I’ll be involved afterwards.

#225
HenryBG1:12 pm, 31 Oct 12

Matt_Watts said :

He actually said that the debate was absolute crap, if I recall correctly, and the fact I can’t point out a simple fact that climate change has always existed whilst also stating that HUMANS HAVE MADE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT and still be attacked as a “denier” leads me to suspect he may have been onto something :)

He said “The argument is absolute crap” in a context clearly referring to the scientific realities as “the argument”.

I’d be very interested in finding out what this “debate” is that you refer to.

Would this be the “debate” between every scientific organisation in the world versus The Australian?

This is like going to a dinner party and shortly after the main course, somebody starts extolling the mystic virtues of the pyramid and notable UFO encounters they’ve read about….

#226
NoImRight1:22 pm, 31 Oct 12

Matt_Watts said :

maxblues said :

thebadtouch said :

Matt, your 15 minutes of fame have passed. Let it go and move on. This thread has become redundant!

If the Greens are forming sub-committees of non-elected peeps to help Ratso do his thinking, then maybe there is yet a role for Matt to play in the political process…like start an inquiry into why so many bottleshops are closing since the introduction of the carbon tax…Candamber has closed its Bunda St shop, Cox Kelly seem to have closed their doors and I hear the bottleshops next to LJ Hooker at Kippax is set to close. The electricity bill for your average bottleshops is around $2000 A MONTH (more in some cases) this in unsustainable and I think we will even see Woolworths close one of its BWS stores at Dickson after Christmas.
Most of us enjoy a cold frothy but if something isn’t done about runaway power prices we will end up drinking hot ales POMMY style…blech!

That’s worse news than you’d think… Many small on-license venues purchase certain products from bottle-Os… think bottles of scotch, etc. Those drink at home and at venues are affected.

The thing is, I was involved in issues before the election, and I’ll be involved afterwards.

Bottle shops are closing because of the Carbon Tax? And the follow up tragedy is other business will now suffer….somehow not made clear apart from a vague reference to scotch. Geez at least try to make a sane argument of it.

#227
maxblues1:33 pm, 31 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

Matt_Watts said :

He actually said that the debate was absolute crap, if I recall correctly, and the fact I can’t point out a simple fact that climate change has always existed whilst also stating that HUMANS HAVE MADE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT and still be attacked as a “denier” leads me to suspect he may have been onto something :)

He said “The argument is absolute crap” in a context clearly referring to the scientific realities as “the argument”.

I’d be very interested in finding out what this “debate” is that you refer to.

Would this be the “debate” between every scientific organisation in the world versus The Australian?

This is like going to a dinner party and shortly after the main course, somebody starts extolling the mystic virtues of the pyramid and notable UFO encounters they’ve read about….

Ah…HenryBloodyGreen you obviously attended the ACTUAL full-day Greens workshop where they spent the whole day trying to come up with a message for aliens of the space variety but failed. It’s sad when you set yourself a low standard but fail to achieve it,

#228
Matt_Watts1:34 pm, 31 Oct 12

Geez…

Henry: argument/ debate. Whatever – I stand by my view that humans have made a significant impact on climate change!

NoImRight: merely commenting on how a closure of Bottle-Os will affect more than those who like cold beer at home, in reference to another’s comment. Relax champ, not making a climate change scare campaign.

#229
Gungahlin Al2:55 pm, 31 Oct 12

maxblues said :

…like start an inquiry into why so many bottleshops are closing since the introduction of the carbon tax…Candamber has closed its Bunda St shop, Cox Kelly seem to have closed their doors and I hear the bottleshops next to LJ Hooker at Kippax is set to close.

Carbon tax comes in (for top handful of polluters). Bottleshops close. Therefore bottleshops closed because of carbon tax.

Wood floats. Ducks float. Therefore ducks are made of wood.

Because correlation ALWAYS equals causation…not.

You need to do a search on “carbon tax gold plating” and read up a bit on where the lion’s share of electricity price rises is going, and what electricity wholesalers are doing while they have the cover of the carbon tax to be pegged with the blame by people who know no better. And shockjocks on 2UE who do know better but choose to seldom let facts get in the way of a full-on beat-up. Even Malcolm Turnbull agrees: http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/goldplating-lifts-power-prices-turnbull-20120811-2410x.html

Twice in a month I’m agreeing with HenryBG. WTF?

#230
poetix3:11 pm, 31 Oct 12

Gungahlin Al said :

Wood floats. Ducks float. Therefore ducks are made of wood.

Some ducks are made of wood. Decoy ducks. This interesting point has nothing whatsoever to do with climate change.

#231
Holden Caulfield3:13 pm, 31 Oct 12

I’m confused. Is a wood duck made of wood or duck?

#232
Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd3:28 pm, 31 Oct 12

Holden Caulfield said :

I’m confused. Is a wood duck made of wood or duck?

more importantly, would you rather eat a wooden duck or fail to duck some wood( make what you will of the term wood)

#233
NoImRight3:35 pm, 31 Oct 12

Holden Caulfield said :

I’m confused. Is a wood duck made of wood or duck?

How much wood would a wood duck duck if a would duck could duck wood?

#234
Thumper3:44 pm, 31 Oct 12

NoImRight said :

Holden Caulfield said :

I’m confused. Is a wood duck made of wood or duck?

How much wood would a wood duck duck if a would duck could duck wood?

I can’t even say that, let alone read it….

#235
colourful sydney rac3:50 pm, 31 Oct 12

maxblues said :

thebadtouch said :

Matt, your 15 minutes of fame have passed. Let it go and move on. This thread has become redundant!

If the Greens are forming sub-committees of non-elected peeps to help Ratso do his thinking, then maybe there is yet a role for Matt to play in the political process…like start an inquiry into why so many bottleshops are closing since the introduction of the carbon tax…Candamber has closed its Bunda St shop, Cox Kelly seem to have closed their doors and I hear the bottleshops next to LJ Hooker at Kippax is set to close. The electricity bill for your average bottleshops is around $2000 A MONTH (more in some cases) this in unsustainable and I think we will even see Woolworths close one of its BWS stores at Dickson after Christmas.
Most of us enjoy a cold frothy but if something isn’t done about runaway power prices we will end up drinking hot ales POMMY style…blech!

moron.

#236
poetix4:00 pm, 31 Oct 12

Thumper said :

NoImRight said :

Holden Caulfield said :

I’m confused. Is a wood duck made of wood or duck?

How much wood would a wood duck duck if a would duck could duck wood?

I can’t even say that, let alone read it….

Just let it run from your tongue like splinters off a duck’s back.

Ouch!

#237
maxblues4:34 pm, 31 Oct 12

Gungahlin Al said :

maxblues said :

…like start an inquiry into why so many bottleshops are closing since the introduction of the carbon tax…Candamber has closed its Bunda St shop, Cox Kelly seem to have closed their doors and I hear the bottleshops next to LJ Hooker at Kippax is set to close.

Carbon tax comes in (for top handful of polluters). Bottleshops close. Therefore bottleshops closed because of carbon tax.

Wood floats. Ducks float. Therefore ducks are made of wood.

Because correlation ALWAYS equals causation…not.

You need to do a search on “carbon tax gold plating” and read up a bit on where the lion’s share of electricity price rises is going, and what electricity wholesalers are doing while they have the cover of the carbon tax to be pegged with the blame by people who know no better. And shockjocks on 2UE who do know better but choose to seldom let facts get in the way of a full-on beat-up. Even Malcolm Turnbull agrees: http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/goldplating-lifts-power-prices-turnbull-20120811-2410x.html

Twice in a month I’m agreeing with HenryBG. WTF?

First let’s acknowledge the sad passing of Jimmy from the Wood Duck Inn. RIP
Secondly let’s mention the universally acknowledged effect the carbon tax will have on the CPI (higher than expected rise in September) which is used to calculate the twice yearly excise rise on your stubby of beer. No wood ducks about it, the carbon tax will increase the amount of excise the government extracts out of your stubbie. At the last beer price rise, on 1 Aug, the breweries made it clear in their correspondence that it was a normal excise/cost rise and that the effects of the carbon tax won’t kick in until the next excise rise on 1 Feb.
Thirdly, the unprecented number of bottleshops closing, is only happening since the introduction of the carbon tax. ‘Gold-plating’ has been going on for years with lack of regulation by the government but in the ten years prior to the introduction of the carbon tax, I can only think of one Canberra bottleshop closing and that was George’s at Braddon who I believe was offered a shitload by a wholesale baker who then turned it over to Ronald McDonald for a McCafe.
I would go on, but I have to duck off…

#238
NoImRight5:00 pm, 31 Oct 12

maxblues said :

Gungahlin Al said :

maxblues said :

…like start an inquiry into why so many bottleshops are closing since the introduction of the carbon tax…Candamber has closed its Bunda St shop, Cox Kelly seem to have closed their doors and I hear the bottleshops next to LJ Hooker at Kippax is set to close.

Carbon tax comes in (for top handful of polluters). Bottleshops close. Therefore bottleshops closed because of carbon tax.

Wood floats. Ducks float. Therefore ducks are made of wood.

Because correlation ALWAYS equals causation…not.

You need to do a search on “carbon tax gold plating” and read up a bit on where the lion’s share of electricity price rises is going, and what electricity wholesalers are doing while they have the cover of the carbon tax to be pegged with the blame by people who know no better. And shockjocks on 2UE who do know better but choose to seldom let facts get in the way of a full-on beat-up. Even Malcolm Turnbull agrees: http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/goldplating-lifts-power-prices-turnbull-20120811-2410x.html

Twice in a month I’m agreeing with HenryBG. WTF?

First let’s acknowledge the sad passing of Jimmy from the Wood Duck Inn. RIP
Secondly let’s mention the universally acknowledged effect the carbon tax will have on the CPI (higher than expected rise in September) which is used to calculate the twice yearly excise rise on your stubby of beer. No wood ducks about it, the carbon tax will increase the amount of excise the government extracts out of your stubbie. At the last beer price rise, on 1 Aug, the breweries made it clear in their correspondence that it was a normal excise/cost rise and that the effects of the carbon tax won’t kick in until the next excise rise on 1 Feb.
Thirdly, the unprecented number of bottleshops closing, is only happening since the introduction of the carbon tax. ‘Gold-plating’ has been going on for years with lack of regulation by the government but in the ten years prior to the introduction of the carbon tax, I can only think of one Canberra bottleshop closing and that was George’s at Braddon who I believe was offered a shitload by a wholesale baker who then turned it over to Ronald McDonald for a McCafe.
I would go on, but I have to duck off…

Thats a long post just to prove Gungahlin Al’s point.

#239
HenryBG5:15 pm, 31 Oct 12

Gungahlin Al said :

You need to do a search on “carbon tax gold plating” and read up a bit on where the lion’s share of electricity price rises is going, and what electricity wholesalers are doing while they have the cover of the carbon tax to be pegged with the blame by people who know no better. And shockjocks on 2UE who do know better but choose to seldom let facts get in the way of a full-on beat-up. Even Malcolm Turnbull agrees: http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/goldplating-lifts-power-prices-turnbull-20120811-2410x.html

Turnbull is living proof you don’t have to be retard to be in the Liberal Party.

So much for the nutters in the Liberal Party and their alarmism:

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/cost-of-carbon-tax-less-than-estimated-20121024-285se.html

“THE carbon tax has boosted the cost of living scarcely at all. Despite dire talk of an ”almost unimaginable” increase (Tony Abbott) and $100 for a Sunday roast (Barnaby Joyce) the first official consumer price figures show a far lower impact than predicted by the Treasury.
Last July, Treasury said the tax would push up the consumer price index 0.70 percentage points, adding $9.90 per week to average household costs. In return, households were given compensation averaging $10.10 per week.
But 0.70 percentage points looks like being an overestimate. Inflation figures for the September quarter – the one that encompasses almost all of the electricity and gas price rises – show them adding 0.44 points to the CPI. It’s a big figure, but not that much bigger than the usual September quarter slug.
Melbourne households have endured a 13.6 per cent increase in electricity prices – unwelcome but well short of previous September quarter jumps of 19 per cent and 21 per cent.
Advertisement
Nationwide, electricity and gas price rises have added 0.25 and 0.33 points to the consumer price index in the past two September quarters. Treasury expected the gas and electricity price hikes to account for only half of the 0.70 boost, the rest being accounted for by businesses that passed them on.
But Commonwealth Bank senior economist Michael Blythe makes the point that if the electricity and gas impact is about half what was expected, it is likely the total impact will be, too.
”It is looking as if the Treasury’s figure will be an overestimate rather than an underestimate,” he said.

#240
maxblues6:19 pm, 31 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

Gungahlin Al said :

You need to do a search on “carbon tax gold plating” and read up a bit on where the lion’s share of electricity price rises is going, and what electricity wholesalers are doing while they have the cover of the carbon tax to be pegged with the blame by people who know no better. And shockjocks on 2UE who do know better but choose to seldom let facts get in the way of a full-on beat-up. Even Malcolm Turnbull agrees: http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/goldplating-lifts-power-prices-turnbull-20120811-2410x.html

Turnbull is living proof you don’t have to be retard to be in the Liberal Party.

So much for the nutters in the Liberal Party and their alarmism:

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/cost-of-carbon-tax-less-than-estimated-20121024-285se.html

“THE carbon tax has boosted the cost of living scarcely at all. Despite dire talk of an ”almost unimaginable” increase (Tony Abbott) and $100 for a Sunday roast (Barnaby Joyce) the first official consumer price figures show a far lower impact than predicted by the Treasury.
Last July, Treasury said the tax would push up the consumer price index 0.70 percentage points, adding $9.90 per week to average household costs. In return, households were given compensation averaging $10.10 per week.
But 0.70 percentage points looks like being an overestimate. Inflation figures for the September quarter – the one that encompasses almost all of the electricity and gas price rises – show them adding 0.44 points to the CPI. It’s a big figure, but not that much bigger than the usual September quarter slug.
Melbourne households have endured a 13.6 per cent increase in electricity prices – unwelcome but well short of previous September quarter jumps of 19 per cent and 21 per cent.
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Nationwide, electricity and gas price rises have added 0.25 and 0.33 points to the consumer price index in the past two September quarters. Treasury expected the gas and electricity price hikes to account for only half of the 0.70 boost, the rest being accounted for by businesses that passed them on.
But Commonwealth Bank senior economist Michael Blythe makes the point that if the electricity and gas impact is about half what was expected, it is likely the total impact will be, too.
”It is looking as if the Treasury’s figure will be an overestimate rather than an underestimate,” he said.

HenryBeerGuzzler did you miss the point that the breweries have stated that the carbon tax effect will not be applied until NEXT February? Then frothy consumers will bearing the burden, landlords will begin using to increase leases (automatic in most commercial leases) and of course this too will be passed onto the consumer.
Probably nothing to do with the carbon tax, but I believe IGA Campbell will no longer sell liquor. It’s becoming a thirsty argument…

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