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Yes we can build the tram: ALP/Greens victorious

By Charlotte Harper - 16 October 2016 50

Andrew Barr

Tonight, hundreds of Canberrans in red shirts chanted, “Build the tram! Build the tram! Build the tram!” in between choruses of “Four more years! Four more years! Four more years!” as Chief Minister Andrew Barr claimed victory in the 2016 ACT Legislative Assembly election.

See Mr Barr’s speech here:

Labor and Greens supporters have for months referred exclusively to the public transport project that formed one of the key issues in the ACT election campaign as light rail, while its detractors used the word tram.

Clearly, that distinction was no longer deemed necessary.

Stages one and two of the light rail network, between Gungahlin and Woden, will be built.

The results became evident much earlier in the night (or week even) than anyone had expected, with the ABC’s Antony Green calling it for Labor shortly before 8.30pm. The result included a swing as had been predicted, but away from the Liberals, as had not.

Which party did you give your number one vote to in the ACT election today (or during pre-polling)?

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With 78.1 per cent of the vote counted early this morning, there was a projected 3.3 per cent swing against the Liberals. Most of that swing was expected to go to minor parties and independents, with a 0.2 per cent swing towards Labor and 0.1 per cent away from the Greens.

The Canberra Liberals function

Canberra Liberals leader Jeremy Hanson conceded last night that it would be difficult for his party to form government, and congratulated Chief Minister Andrew Barr on retaining office. He addressed party faithful at the Canberra Southern Cross Club.

See Mr Hanson’s speech here:

ACT Greens Leader Shane Rattenbury, who was at the pokies-free Polish Club in Turner with his fellow Greens candidates and supporters, spoke with Mr Barr during the evening to give his commitment that the Greens would once again work with Labor to form a progressive government.

Shane Rattenbury and supporters.

See Mr Rattenbury’s speech to Greens supporters here:

Winners and losers

Returned sitting MLAs include Mr Rattenbury; Mr Barr and his Labor colleagues Joy Burch, Mick Gentleman, Yvette Berry and Meegan Fitzharris; and Mr Hanson and his Liberals colleagues Steve Doszpot, Giulia Jones, Vicki Dunne and Alistair Coe.

At risk of losing their seats are incumbents Chris Bourke, Jayson Hinder and Nicole Lawder (though on Sunday morning ABC elections expert Antony Green indicated he expected Ms Lawder to be elected ahead of Steven Bailey of the Sex Party).

Candidates who would be new to the Assembly and are likely to be elected based on the latest count are Elizabeth Lee, Mark Parton, James Milligan and Paul Sweeney for the Liberals; Caroline Le Couteur for the Greens; and Rachel Stephen-Smith, Bec Cody, Chris Steel, Tara Cheyne, Gordon Ramsay, Suzanne Orr and Michael Pettersson for Labor.

In that other election contest being decided tonight, the RiotACT candidate bake-off, Labor’s Jennifer Newman picked up the editor’s choice award for her chocolate balloons cake, and Like Canberra’s Maryann Mussared won the readers’ choice gong.

Pictured are Chief Minister Andrew Barr with his family (photo: Chester Ward); the Canberra Liberals’ function (photo: Josh Mulrine); and Shane Rattenbury and supporters (photo: Charlotte Harper).

What’s Your opinion?


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50 Responses to
Yes we can build the tram: ALP/Greens victorious
1
Chris Mordd Richards 2:41 am
16 Oct 16
#

This is my only response at this stage: http://imgur.com/a/CE35o

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2
wildturkeycanoe 6:47 am
16 Oct 16
#

Canberrans are *sigh* dumb enough to keep Labor at the helm. I guess I’d better start saving up for those future 10% hits to my rates bills plus any other new levies they decide to add on, or will it be 20% now that we’ve committed to stage 2?

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3
wildturkeycanoe 7:23 am
16 Oct 16
#

Sorry for double post, but I also would like to mention my personal gripe with the electoral “hare rabbit” system. Labor only gets around 40% of the primary vote. How is that a decisive victory when nearly 60% of voters do not want Labor at the helm? We will keep counting preferences till it is all over but still, Canberra will have a party in power that most people may not have cast a single vote for or who was possibly thirteenth or worse on their list. Even with the Green’s support, half the territory won’t be happy. I personally think we are given too many choices. With thirty three candidates in one electorate for example, to fill only five seats, when a party has five candidates vying for a spot, the odds of one of them getting in increases from 33:1 to 6.6:1. Even more so because people are less likely to vote for an independent who has no party affiliates in other electorates, because even if they got a seat they cannot have a majority and would be shouted down by the winning major party, whoever that is. So when it all comes down to it, the only parties that even have a chance of forming a government are Labor or Liberal, whilst anybody else would not have the numbers to gain control. If this was put to a second vote and we only had the red and blue team to choose from, I wonder which way it would have gone.
BTW, why have a “Who did you vote for?” poll after the election, when the results are already available on the election A.C.T website? The results here would really only reflect the political leanings of your subscribers, who in my mind were overwhelmingly in support of the Liberals.

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4
rommeldog56 8:20 am
16 Oct 16
#

The people have spoken. So be it. The ACT Liberal’s campaign strategists got it terribly wrong. Plus, never underestimate the apathy of the ACTs over paid and far too affluent voters.

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5
Heavs 8:35 am
16 Oct 16
#

Swing against. Too funny. Hopefully the echo chamber are quiet for the next week or so while they finish eabbod.

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6
chewy14 8:35 am
16 Oct 16
#

Fairly standard result for ACT voters, who consistently lean toward Labor regardless of the local issues.
Although they’ve likely won, the bragging quoted in the Canberra Times is a bit over the top, this vote was situation normal rather than a glowing endorsement of Labor and the Greens.

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7
MERC600 10:22 am
16 Oct 16
#

Well my wallet will become thinner through the week as I run into people who I owe some cash to over the result.
I didn’t get totally carried away though as I was wary of green support.

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8
Maya123 11:45 am
16 Oct 16
#

wildturkeycanoe said :

Sorry for double post, but I also would like to mention my personal gripe with the electoral “hare rabbit” system. Labor only gets around 40% of the primary vote. How is that a decisive victory when nearly 60% of voters do not want Labor at the helm? We will keep counting preferences till it is all over but still, Canberra will have a party in power that most people may not have cast a single vote for or who was possibly thirteenth or worse on their list. Even with the Green’s support, half the territory won’t be happy. I personally think we are given too many choices. With thirty three candidates in one electorate for example, to fill only five seats, when a party has five candidates vying for a spot, the odds of one of them getting in increases from 33:1 to 6.6:1. Even more so because people are less likely to vote for an independent who has no party affiliates in other electorates, because even if they got a seat they cannot have a majority and would be shouted down by the winning major party, whoever that is. So when it all comes down to it, the only parties that even have a chance of forming a government are Labor or Liberal, whilst anybody else would not have the numbers to gain control. If this was put to a second vote and we only had the red and blue team to choose from, I wonder which way it would have gone.
BTW, why have a “Who did you vote for?” poll after the election, when the results are already available on the election A.C.T website? The results here would really only reflect the political leanings of your subscribers, who in my mind were overwhelmingly in support of the Liberals.

It doesn’t mean that 60% of the voters don’t want Labor at the helm. It means that more people put Labor somewhere on their list ahead of the Liberals, meaning, even if they didn’t put them first, after their preferred candidate didn’t get up, they would prefer Labor than the alternative.

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9
BunLover 11:51 am
16 Oct 16
#

chewy14 said :

Fairly standard result for ACT voters, who consistently lean toward Labor regardless of the local issues.
Although they’ve likely won, the bragging quoted in the Canberra Times is a bit over the top, this vote was situation normal rather than a glowing endorsement of Labor and the Greens.

It was quite a substantial swing against the Liberals, which says more about the community mood.

Report this comment

10
JimCharles 12:08 pm
16 Oct 16
#

I would have voted Liberal but their attempt to campaign on Health wasn’t convincing, full of inaccuracies and taking old sketches paid for by Labor and drawing over them, plus using quotes from disaffected ex-project managers who were let go for a reason (and it wasn’t that they were good at their jobs).
It seemed that they were asking for power and promising money for the sake of it, rather than introducing any new ideas or proven practices that Health services in Canberra desperately needs. They missed the point and showed they didn’t understand.
It’s not just a case of promising to throw more money at things, this gravy train has gone on for long enough with poor management and a lack of accountability in the executive.
They are not smart at ACT Heath when it comes to knowing how to deliver or manage good outcomes from vast outlays of money and the turnover of more-productive staff is high, the management of the less-productive is poor.
Proper radical transformation is needed and it’s an open secret in Canberra, but for all we heard about radical change in this election, we might as well keep Labor as soon as swap for another bunch of headline makers who seemed to have no more idea than the current mob.

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11
Nightshade 12:30 pm
16 Oct 16
#

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Sorry for double post, but I also would like to mention my personal gripe with the electoral “hare rabbit” system. Labor only gets around 40% of the primary vote. How is that a decisive victory when nearly 60% of voters do not want Labor at the helm?

It doesn’t mean that 60% of the voters don’t want Labor at the helm. It means that more people put Labor somewhere on their list ahead of the Liberals, meaning, even if they didn’t put them first, after their preferred candidate didn’t get up, they would prefer Labor than the alternative.

That’s not true at the current time. Only #1 votes have been counted at this stage. Preferences have not yet come into play.

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12
gooterz 12:36 pm
16 Oct 16
#

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Sorry for double post, but I also would like to mention my personal gripe with the electoral “hare rabbit” system. Labor only gets around 40% of the primary vote. How is that a decisive victory when nearly 60% of voters do not want Labor at the helm? We will keep counting preferences till it is all over but still, Canberra will have a party in power that most people may not have cast a single vote for or who was possibly thirteenth or worse on their list. Even with the Green’s support, half the territory won’t be happy. I personally think we are given too many choices. With thirty three candidates in one electorate for example, to fill only five seats, when a party has five candidates vying for a spot, the odds of one of them getting in increases from 33:1 to 6.6:1. Even more so because people are less likely to vote for an independent who has no party affiliates in other electorates, because even if they got a seat they cannot have a majority and would be shouted down by the winning major party, whoever that is. So when it all comes down to it, the only parties that even have a chance of forming a government are Labor or Liberal, whilst anybody else would not have the numbers to gain control. If this was put to a second vote and we only had the red and blue team to choose from, I wonder which way it would have gone.
BTW, why have a “Who did you vote for?” poll after the election, when the results are already available on the election A.C.T website? The results here would really only reflect the political leanings of your subscribers, who in my mind were overwhelmingly in support of the Liberals.

It doesn’t mean that 60% of the voters don’t want Labor at the helm. It means that more people put Labor somewhere on their list ahead of the Liberals, meaning, even if they didn’t put them first, after their preferred candidate didn’t get up, they would prefer Labor than the alternative.

Preferences haven’t come into it at all

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13
HiddenDragon 5:43 pm
16 Oct 16
#

As I listened, last night, to the Americanised waffle about “ground games”, “swing seats”, “policy wonks” etc., I was reminded of this very apt quote, sometimes attributed to one of the founders of the American republic:

“A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury. After that, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits, with the result the democracy collapses because of the loose fiscal policy ensuing, always to be followed by a dictatorship, then a monarchy.”

Let’s just hope that the current rally in the price of that most politically incorrect of commodities – coal – is sufficiently large and durable to allow the federal government to keep pumping enough money into Canberra to pay for all the “positive”, “progressive” things which were voted for last night.

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14
chewy14 8:20 pm
16 Oct 16
#

BunLover said :

chewy14 said :

Fairly standard result for ACT voters, who consistently lean toward Labor regardless of the local issues.
Although they’ve likely won, the bragging quoted in the Canberra Times is a bit over the top, this vote was situation normal rather than a glowing endorsement of Labor and the Greens.

It was quite a substantial swing against the Liberals, which says more about the community mood.

Not really seeing as Labor and the Greens vote barely moved. People voted for more independents and minor parties as first preference, which is what hurts the Libs. It will be interesting to see where the preferences flow in coming days.

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15
JC 12:02 am
17 Oct 16
#

chewy14 said :

BunLover said :

chewy14 said :

Fairly standard result for ACT voters, who consistently lean toward Labor regardless of the local issues.
Although they’ve likely won, the bragging quoted in the Canberra Times is a bit over the top, this vote was situation normal rather than a glowing endorsement of Labor and the Greens.

It was quite a substantial swing against the Liberals, which says more about the community mood.

Not really seeing as Labor and the Greens vote barely moved. People voted for more independents and minor parties as first preference, which is what hurts the Libs. It will be interesting to see where the preferences flow in coming days.

Even if the flow back to the Libs it won’t make much difference to the end result as excess quota votes are calculated before preferences. So strong 1st preference means bigger chance of excess quota votes and these generally flow down through the major parties.

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