Your re-sealed roads are rubbish!

By 10 December, 2013 93

Gee, it seems we Canberrans will cop anything – even the rubbish they call road re-sealing. You see (hear and feel) all the loose aggregate (stones) and you think ‘oh, this is temporary, they’ll be back to put the proper bitumen coat on’. But they don’t. So our streets now resemble something worse than you’ll find in the outback.

Our street was fine before they rushed (it took them 45min) a program of re-sealing ahead of the last election. They selected a much larger aggregate size, which means the kids can’t walk on the road without covered footwear, so less bike riding/random acts of exercise. There are still loose stones everywhere years afterward. I rang to complain and I asked what standard do they have to comply with.  Answer: None (they do for newly built roads only).

A few years ago they couldn’t put the roads in the right places (think about the interchange), now they can’t pave properly.  What next? Dirt roads?

I love Canberra but I’m getting sick of this cheap, miserly and sometimes mean government.

Please login to post your comments
93 Responses to Your re-sealed roads are rubbish!
#1
davo1018:30 am, 10 Dec 13

I love Canberra but I’m getting sick of this cheap, miserly and sometimes mean government.

Meanwhile the other half of Canberra thinks the government is lavish and extravagant. Funny how finding a compromise results in everyone being unhappy.

#2
Deref8:50 am, 10 Dec 13

A mate of mine who’s a keen bicycle rider says that the effort required to pedal on chipseal is significantly greater than that on a decent surface.

If that’s true, and it certainly makes sense, then the same’s true of the energy required to move a car over chipseal.

Wouldn’t it be interesting to know how much more petrol’s burnt to provide the extra energy across Canberra’s roads.

#3
AAMC9:44 am, 10 Dec 13

WhaWhat next? Dirt roads?

Hope so; it will make the mundane trip to work more interesting with a winch recovery!

#4
KB197110:24 am, 10 Dec 13

AAMC said :

WhaWhat next? Dirt roads?

Hope so; it will make the mundane trip to work more interesting with a winch recovery!

And Scandanavian Flicks…….

#5
Gungahlin Al10:29 am, 10 Dec 13

I agree wholeheartedly, and have been saying as much here for years.
And it turns suburban back streets into cheese grates for your kids.

#6
KB197110:52 am, 10 Dec 13

Gungahlin Al said :

I agree wholeheartedly, and have been saying as much here for years.
And it turns suburban back streets into cheese grates for your kids.

Go & drive around the suburbs/streets of anyother City/town in Australia and you will see that statement is incorrect.

#7
Grrrr11:15 am, 10 Dec 13

All the above, and I find that they can’t even smooth the dips / holes out whilst they’re at it. Half the roads I’ve seen re-sealed were worse off as a result. I just don’t get it – are we all missing something? Extra grip for cars as a result of the rougher surface, maybe?

#8
Solidarity11:16 am, 10 Dec 13

Makes riding a motorbike much more interesting, that’s for sure. Can’t ride in the middle due to loose gravel everywhere, can’t ride in the car wheel tracks because the car in front pelts rocks at you… fun!

#9
rhino11:19 am, 10 Dec 13

I think the problem lies in how they think of value. To them, they have $x million to spend and they think “we could make one road really nice or we could “reseal” 5 roads to this lower standard and we will have gotten more from our money”.

The problem with that lies in the cost to the community. Extra petrol multiplied by hundreds of thousands of trips over that road, plus broken windscreens and chipped paint repairs etc all make the cost far greater. That cost may not be on the balance sheet of the government, but the total cost to community should be considered. After all, the government is basically supposed to be a group of us citizens acting on behalf of all of us for our greater community benefit.

#10
Watson11:39 am, 10 Dec 13

I’m going to get behind this whinge. They did this to our old street in Nth Canberra a couple of years ago and it is exactly as you described. We used to regularly walk barefoot, but that was made impossible. Kids riding bikes got a lot more risky and scooters or rollerblades impossible. And there were no footpaths in that street.

But what irritated me most was that the surface looked quite good in that street before. This was one of those small crescents where it is virtually impossible to get any speed up with the car unless you want to end up in the park or someone’s frontyard. There were no potholes, no noticeable cracks and it was nice smooth surface.

I’d rather that they reseal less than do it cheap. I very much doubt that the surface of the street would’ve deteriorated much if they would’ve waited a couple of years, due to there not being much traffic and cars driving slowly.

#11
Antagonist11:57 am, 10 Dec 13

Another example is the recent ‘reseal’ undertaken on Pitman St, Tuggeranong (outside Southern Cross Club). You can clearly see the white road markings and arrows from before the ‘reseal’. All they did was scatter loose stones around, without bothering to stick them down with new road tar, or remove the excess stones. I would not even call it a reseal. Dodgy as hell.

Half-@rsed is an understatement. TaMS could not organise a root in a brothel with a fist-full of $50 notes.

#12
magiccar912:13 pm, 10 Dec 13

Antagonist said :

Another example is the recent ‘reseal’ undertaken on Pitman St, Tuggeranong (outside Southern Cross Club). You can clearly see the white road markings and arrows from before the ‘reseal’. All they did was scatter loose stones around, without bothering to stick them down with new road tar, or remove the excess stones. I would not even call it a reseal. Dodgy as hell.

Half-@rsed is an understatement. TaMS could not organise a root in a brothel with a fist-full of $50 notes.

I’m glad someone brought this up. I avoid newly surfaced roads like the plague – even if it adds considerable time to my journey.

Was sitting on Pitman St the other day (in someone else’s car, naturally). I looked at the road next to me. The new surface has actually worn off through to the old one. I put this down to the extreme use of this small section from every bus exiting the interchange. Surely this would have been a prime section for the mythical ‘hot seal’ method. It’s not a large run – probably 500-600m tops – and is hammered by heavy vehicles all day long… But alas, cheap and nasty it is.

#13
goody65812:14 pm, 10 Dec 13

Yeh roads are bad here, but unless the people people complain to the proper group then nothing will change and we’ll still be here in 10 years talking about the state of our dirt roads.

#14
Thumper12:26 pm, 10 Dec 13

Solidarity said :

Makes riding a motorbike much more interesting, that’s for sure. Can’t ride in the middle due to loose gravel everywhere, can’t ride in the car wheel tracks because the car in front pelts rocks at you… fun!

And if you’ve got a belt drive, well, you’re f*cked….

#15
Gungahlin Al12:29 pm, 10 Dec 13

I was talking to Katy Gallagher (then Treasurer) and Tony Gill about this issue in one Community Cabinet Meeting at Harrison.

I asked what the resealing cycle is for Canberra Streets. “20 years” I was told.

I asked what is the life cycle of their chipseal approach to resealing streets? “15 years” I was told.

Now unless something’s seriously wrong with my Grade 1 maths, that does not represent a sustainable solution…

#16
HiddenDragon12:32 pm, 10 Dec 13

davo101 said :

I love Canberra but I’m getting sick of this cheap, miserly and sometimes mean government.

Meanwhile the other half of Canberra thinks the government is lavish and extravagant. Funny how finding a compromise results in everyone being unhappy.

Or perhaps it’s about priorities, and giving more attention to the unglamorous day-to-day stuff which matters to most Canberrans.

#17
Canberroid12:47 pm, 10 Dec 13

Deref said :

A mate of mine who’s a keen bicycle rider says that the effort required to pedal on chipseal is significantly greater than that on a decent surface.

If that’s true, and it certainly makes sense, then the same’s true of the energy required to move a car over chipseal.

Wouldn’t it be interesting to know how much more petrol’s burnt to provide the extra energy across Canberra’s roads.

I occasionally go for a ride up the Federal Highway, and the chip-seal goes right to the NSW border. Fortunately the ACT govt didn’t chip-seal the shoulder so it’s still a reasonably smooth ride apart from all the loose gravel. However the increased difficulty in riding over the chip-seal on the off-ramp to Majura Road is astounding (pictured pre-seal: https://maps.google.com.au/?ll=-35.207638,149.193708&spn=0.003078,0.004128&t=h&z=19&layer=c&cbll=-35.207829,149.193427&panoid=yZVmXN5ayaFFvEcH56zJkw&cbp=12,221.46,,0,-4.5). With the slight incline and me being knackered it means the difference between peddling seated and standing.

I’ve also almost come off my bike due to a dodgy chip-seal job on the Canberra Avenue bike lane near Manuka oval. I avoid riding on Antil st and Phillip ave because it’s like riding into a permanent stiff breeze because of the shitty chip-seal surface, and many of the “resealed” roads around Watson are atrocious.

#18
rhino12:57 pm, 10 Dec 13

I agree with others that it seems like very often they do this cheap reseal on roads that were far above average condition. If it’s a nice smooth surface with no pot holes or cracks…do not touch it. Even if it was being resurfaced properly, it still wouldn’t be worthwhile if it is fine already. But to chuck rocks on it and decrease the quality of the road surface whilst spreading rocks everywhere AND wasting our money in the process…that is almost unforgivable stupidity.

#19
davo10110:13 am, 11 Dec 13

HiddenDragon said :

davo101 said :

I love Canberra but I’m getting sick of this cheap, miserly and sometimes mean government.

Meanwhile the other half of Canberra thinks the government is lavish and extravagant. Funny how finding a compromise results in everyone being unhappy.

Or perhaps it’s about priorities, and giving more attention to the unglamorous day-to-day stuff which matters to most Canberrans me.

Yeap, that’s your opinion. Meanwhile other people think we should spend more money on health, education, police, sporting facilities, bike paths, tourist campaigns, childcare. While at the same time others think we should spend less on exactly the same list while giving them a cut in rates. What do you think the ACT government is spending its money on, blackjack and hookers? Half the budget goes on health and education, once you add on police, justice, emergency services, public transport, roads, drains, parks, and the accompanying administration there’s really not that much left

#20
Thumper11:11 am, 11 Dec 13

I asked what is the life cycle of their chipseal approach to resealing streets? “15 years” I was told.

15 years? Is that an aspirational life cycle?

:)

#21
davo10112:51 pm, 11 Dec 13

Thumper said :

I asked what is the life cycle of their chipseal approach to resealing streets? “15 years” I was told.

15 years? Is that an aspirational life cycle?

:)

Pretty much. The most commonly quoted life span for a reseal appears to be 10 years.

#22
Felix the Cat1:34 pm, 11 Dec 13

I wonder how they decide which roads get chipseal and which roads gets “proper” smooth seal? A few months back they resealed part of Gungahlin Dr and also part of Flemington Rd, both near Mitchell, and did it with smooth seal.

#23
rhino11:24 am, 16 Dec 13

Felix the Cat said :

I wonder how they decide which roads get chipseal and which roads gets “proper” smooth seal? A few months back they resealed part of Gungahlin Dr and also part of Flemington Rd, both near Mitchell, and did it with smooth seal.

Yeah, I give them credit for that road. It’s certainly an improvement and appears like it should last a while.

I would like to know how they decide which roads get what though.

#24
Jere1312:10 pm, 07 Jan 14

rhino said :

I think the problem lies in how they think of value. To them, they have $x million to spend and they think “we could make one road really nice or we could “reseal” 5 roads to this lower standard and we will have gotten more from our money”.

The problem with that lies in the cost to the community. Extra petrol multiplied by hundreds of thousands of trips over that road, plus broken windscreens and chipped paint repairs etc all make the cost far greater. That cost may not be on the balance sheet of the government, but the total cost to community should be considered. After all, the government is basically supposed to be a group of us citizens acting on behalf of all of us for our greater community benefit.

I completely agree. There was a study done in NZ that found the extra fuel used with coarse seal can be as much as an extra 0.9l/100km. Pretty significant I would say.

All I can say is please everyone put these thoughts in writing and write to Shane Rattenbury (PO Box 1020, Canberra, ACT 2601). It is the only way things will change.

I have written to Katy Gallagher twice and Shane Rattenbury once on this issue, suggesting that if we aren’t going to get any more asphalt/concrete roads (it’s too expensive in the short term or ‘uneconomical’ as they described it) we can at least invest in better quality seals with smaller aggeragate to improve noise and ride. I found Shane’s response to me much more constructive. Aparently they are trialing cape seal in two locations, so let’s hope things get better.

I’m not sure what’s worse, the damage to our cars or the tyre roar. It’s so loud when you enter the ACT on the federal hwy that you can’t have to turn the radio up. What a great first impression to our city.

#25
A_Cog12:57 pm, 07 Jan 14

Jere13 said :

Aparently they are trialing cape seal in two locations, so let’s hope things get better.

Where are the two locations?

#26
Zeital1:41 pm, 07 Jan 14

I would love to see the cost benefit of doing a road right the 1st time compared to doing a shitty job X-amount of times in terms of time spent doing/fixing etc.

#27
JC3:37 pm, 07 Jan 14

Zeital said :

I would love to see the cost benefit of doing a road right the 1st time compared to doing a shitty job X-amount of times in terms of time spent doing/fixing etc.

Most of our roads are done properly the first time, Glenloch interchange being an exception for some reason.

The problem of course is 10-15 years after they are built they, get this, need a thing called maintenance, yes maintenance because the surface has become semi pours, which allows water to get underneath which in turn then damages the pavement.

The options are rip it up the top layer of road, reseal and relay with hot mix it or spray a layer of bituminous material to reseal the road, which then needs an aggregate to form a road surface with grip.

Now unlike Sydney main roads for example our roads do not see much traffic, especially heavy vehicles which destroy the pavement. So the most cost effective thing to do is reseal. By all accounts reseal is 1/4 of the cost of a resurface and has to be done every 5-8 years. A resurface only needs to be done every 8-12 years but yes gives a better driving surface. So reseal, despite needing to be done twice as often end up being half the cost.

So as I say all the time it comes down to whether you are prepared to dip into your pocket to pay double for the road maintenance budget just to have a smoother road surface?

Canberra is no different to anywhere else in the country in using chip seal. Though in other places, again using Sydney as an example you will only generally see it in the suburban roads as main roads generally get resurfaced as heavy vehicles in particular destroy the surface meaning a resurface is the only option.

Around here you will see intersections are normally resurfaced, because vehicles stopping deform the road surface, meaning a resurface is the way to go.

#28
Zan4:04 pm, 07 Jan 14

Our car parkes are rubbish too. At Coolamon Court Weston Creek just before Christmas they sealed both car parks in the heat. They melted and they had to lay a couple of strips of gravel down the driving areas. Today (not a hot day) the car parks are still in a melt down state. What is it going to look like in February when it gets hotter.

#29
Mark of Sydney6:16 pm, 07 Jan 14

JC said :

Zeital said :

I would love to see the cost benefit of doing a road right the 1st time compared to doing a shitty job X-amount of times in terms of time spent doing/fixing etc.


Now unlike Sydney main roads for example our roads do not see much traffic, especially heavy vehicles which destroy the pavement.

Canberra is no different to anywhere else in the country in using chip seal. Though in other places, again using Sydney as an example you will only generally see it in the suburban roads as main roads generally get resurfaced as heavy vehicles in particular destroy the surface meaning a resurface is the only option.

I just don’t buy this. Following previously expressed comments that road surfacing practices in Canberra are no different to elsewhere in Australia I’ve made a point of looking at roads across the inner and middle suburbs of Sydney. And I’ve yet to see the same poor surfaces anywhere in Sydney, even on quiet suburban streets, that you see even on main roads here in Canberra. Chip seal used on roads such as Mort Street in Braddon (along with dusty and litter-strewn verges) and National Circuit in Barton is just shabby. The standard of maintenance (of roads and other elements of the public realm) are poor for a state let alone national capital.

It really strikes you when after driving from Sydney — after 270 km of well maintained motorway you hit the roar of chip seal at the ACT border for just maybe 3 or 4 km before it gets quiet again on Northbourne Avenue at Watson. And I can’t see it has anything to do with traffic levels on this stretch of road.

#30
Felix the Cat6:25 pm, 07 Jan 14

I went up to Corin Forest on the weekend and notice the stretch of road where they had the rockslide last year has been resealed with bitumen that is as smooth as a baby’s bum. Not a loose stone in sight. Not knocking it but found it interesting considering it is a low traffic road and therefore a prime candidate for chipseal.

Advertisement
GET PREMIUM MEMBERSHIP

Halloween in Australia?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

IMAGES OF CANBERRA

Advertisement
Sponsors
RiotACT Proudly Supports
Copyright © 2014 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.