4076 roos to be shot during ACT’s largest kangaroo cull

Lachlan Roberts and Genevieve Jacobs 8 May 2019 96

This year’s cull is the largest undertaken in the history of the program. Photo: George Tsotsos.

The ACT will conduct its largest-ever cull of Eastern Grey kangaroos, with 4076 roos to be killed in nature park reserves across the territory.

The 2019 ACT cull quota is more than the previous year when 3253 roos were culled across the territory and the program will also extend to over 14 sites.

This year’s cull is the largest undertaken in the history of the program in terms of numbers and sites to be targeted, which ACT Parks and Conservation Service director Daniel Iglesias said was due to grassy habitats decreasing across many local nature reserves, causing thousands of kangaroos to starve during the coming winter.

Canberra kangaroo cull and why it’s the right move for our environment

There’s another kangaroo cull going ahead in the ACT, and it will be the largest undertaken in the history of the culling program to date. Daniel Iglesias from ACT Parks and Conservation Service explains more about what’s happening and why wildlife ecology experts believe it’s the right move for our environment.

Posted by The RiotACT on Monday, 6 May 2019

“Kangaroos are an integral part of the ecosystems around Canberra. The conservation cull protects biodiversity and maintains kangaroo populations at appropriate levels to minimise impacts on other plants and animals in critical grassland and woodland sites,” Mr Iglesias said.

“Given the lack of rain, if we don’t cull the kangaroos humanely now, many will starve to death during winter and the quality of the habitat for other species that rely on the ground level vegetation will deteriorate.

“Nobody likes culling kangaroos” – Daniel Iglesias. Photo: Goerge Tsotsos.

“Our ecologists have used the best current scientific knowledge to analyse the status of each reserve’s population, the amount and type of vegetation, rainfall and other relevant factors to determine the numbers to be culled to support conservation outcomes.

“While nobody likes culling kangaroos, it is currently the most humane method of population management available to the ACT Government as a responsible land manager.”

The ANU’s Professor George Wilson, a nationally recognised expert on wildlife ecology management, has backed the plan and says that ACT Parks and Conservation research on managing urban kangaroo populations is the best in Australia.

“The scientists have done marvellous work in conjunction with the two universities in assessing an appropriate density in different reserves,” he says. “They have the best information in the country on what density of kangaroos is appropriate alongside other biodiversity objectives and they must manage to that density. Otherwise, they’re culpable for biodiversity loss.”

Professor Wilson says lack of natural predation has caused an exponential increase in the local kangaroo population. “The kangaroos have this wonderful environment with lots of green grass and protection. That’s not a problem when population is low, but once they get into the tens of thousands, a natural increase of 15 per cent or more each year has a huge impact on the environment.”

After studying and working with kangaroos for more than 50 years, Professor Wilson says he knows (and likes) the marsupials more than most people. “I do everything I can to maximise their welfare. That doesn’t involve allowing them to starve to death or be hit by cars, which are now their major form of predation in Canberra.

“We love to see kangaroos on Red Hill, but we need to know what population Red Hill can actually support. Is it 50, 150, or is it 550?”

Professor Wilson calls the international “compassionate conservation” movement “bad science and bad animal welfare” that allows animals to starve and be run over rather than managing their populations. He believes that a professional shot to the head is “far and away” the most effective control measure.

“ACT Parks and Conservation have a responsibility to biodiversity more widely. They’d abrogate that responsibility if they don’t manage kangaroo populations effectively.”

ACT Parks and Conservation Service will place warning signs and surveillance cameras at all entry points to the reserves where culls are taking place and staff will patrol the reserves during culling operations.

Callum Brae Nature Reserve, Crace Nature Reserve, East Jerrabomberra Grasslands, West Jerrabomberra Grasslands, Goorooyarroo Nature Reserve, Gungaderra Nature Reserve, Kama Nature Reserve, Mulligans Flat Nature Reserve, Mulanggari Grasslands, the Pinnacle Nature Reserve, Mount Mugga Mugga Nature Reserve, Isaacs Ridge Nature Reserve, Mount Majura Nature Reserve and Mount Ainslie Nature Reserve will be closed from Tuesday 7 May, from late afternoon until early morning each day.

The sites are to be re-opened from 26 July or earlier if the program is completed sooner.


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96 Responses to 4076 roos to be shot during ACT’s largest kangaroo cull
Margaret Gracie Margaret Gracie 6:31 am 08 May 19

We've taken over their environment and now we will kill them because of it. Humans are disgusting, any wonder the world is on the verge of destruction.

Benny Preen Benny Preen 5:59 am 08 May 19

And we still pay through the ass for roo meat? I’m vegetarian and I’d still rather see people eat meat that is actually available to us not meat that we produce that harms the environment.

Stuart Mawbey Stuart Mawbey 5:58 am 08 May 19

Vegans would condemn Kangaroos to overpopulate, die of starvation and disease, get run over by cars. The only thing thing they suggest is desexing the animals, ok, who pays for that, every animal activist? get real. People have been eating kangaroo for at least 80,000 years, and its a shame to see them wasted as they will be in this cull. I'd rather we ate them. But we cant have everything.

    Saelig Smythe Saelig Smythe 6:57 am 08 May 19

    Maybe the problem is human over population on the planet and they should use the same method on them?

    Stuart Mawbey Stuart Mawbey 6:58 am 08 May 19

    Saelig Smythe you first, then me, maybe

    Saelig Smythe Saelig Smythe 6:58 am 08 May 19

    No, just the stupid politicians, then their supporters....cough

    Fee Mcgoo Fee Mcgoo 7:14 am 08 May 19

    Stuart Mawbey I don't. It makes sense

    Stuart Mawbey Stuart Mawbey 7:15 am 08 May 19

    Fee Mcgoo you've always had a fair bit of sense, Fee Mcgoo and a compassionate vegan to boot.

Christopher Mawbey Christopher Mawbey 5:29 am 08 May 19

Get to it

Faye Dela Torre Salcedo Faye Dela Torre Salcedo 5:16 am 08 May 19

Can we move them instead this is really disturbing.

    Mark Casao Mark Casao 6:21 am 08 May 19

    Faye Dela Torre Salcedo kangaroos are about double of the Australian population. They're like rabbits

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 8:58 pm 08 May 19

    like rabbits? a rabbit in australia can breed all year producing 7-8 young, a kangaroo is a marsupial , can only breed once a year and that doesnt start until there 3-4 years old. most roos dont live very long in this country, meaning they produce veyr few offspring. it takes knowledge to understand an animal, it take stupidity and a sheep mentality to repeat propaganda.

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 8:59 pm 08 May 19

    plus the so called popualtion of roos is a guess!! a complete guess based on incredibly dodgey science. so noone knows how many roos there are in the country. my guess from going over roo industry data over the past 20 years, they would be no more than 1 or 2 million nationwide, and thats on the high side.

    Faye Dela Torre Salcedo Faye Dela Torre Salcedo 10:38 pm 08 May 19

    Shaun Adams 😱

    Ian Baird Ian Baird 12:15 am 09 May 19

    No, they cannot be moved. They are not herd animals. Any attempt to herd them causes significant stress. Anyway, moving them would just move the problem elsewhere into other kangaroos’ territory.

Steve Aust Steve Aust 12:03 am 08 May 19

After the 4000 kangaroos can they cull 40,000 possums in ACT? They are in plague proportions too, obviously

    Elle Roberts Elle Roberts 12:31 am 08 May 19

    Stephen Roberts Powerful Owls are capable hunters and include sugar gliders, greater gliders, ringtail possums and brushtail possums in their diet. According to Dr Raylene Cooke from Deakin University, Powerful Owls eat an astounding 250 to 350 possums a year. ... In one great bite the Powerful Owl can eat a possum's head.

    Elle Roberts Elle Roberts 12:32 am 08 May 19

    Canberra needs Powerful Owls to get rid of the possum vermin,

    Steve Aust Steve Aust 12:55 am 09 May 19

    Elle Roberts - I will see if Daniel Iglesias can help with that 🙂

Nate Jennings Nate Jennings 11:11 pm 07 May 19

The problem is the grass we water all years round.

    Jason Page Jason Page 10:39 am 08 May 19

    Nate Jennings lets cull the grass. oh wait we do humans think they control every thing that’s the problem.

Hamish Lardi Hamish Lardi 9:41 pm 07 May 19

Timothy Weston Luca Gino think Luke Dal Pozzo knows

Stas Idowu Stas Idowu 9:41 pm 07 May 19

get them on the unpopular tram. ACT election 2020

Shayne Borger Shayne Borger 9:22 pm 07 May 19

Target practice n roo steaks

Rebecca De Vries Rebecca De Vries 9:07 pm 07 May 19

Its basic good land management. Roo numbers are just too high for the land to sustain all other kinds of animals with roo numbers as high as they are now.

    Kurt Halbauer Kurt Halbauer 7:54 am 08 May 19

    💯 Finally someone with some sense. Many species are endangered due to roo numbers but these ARAs all just knee jerk react to the individual animal's plight, not the degradation of entire ecosystems!

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 8:52 pm 08 May 19

    they are not too high, they arent high at all. there is far too many humans. roos cannot effect other native animals. they evolved alongside them, they do not over graze, thats a sheep and cattle behaviour, before your regurgitate the propaganda make sure its factual. roos have never been in lower numbers.

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 8:53 pm 08 May 19

    the ecosystem in canberra is degraded because of housing and farming, control that everything gets better, killing roos only stops valuable grass seeds being spread.

    Benice Richmond Benice Richmond 12:48 am 09 May 19

    Rebecca De Vries do you even live in canberra. You into fake news too. Seriously stop listening to farmers and the governments who have their own agenda. Or may be you are part of that agenda.......

Jessica Grace Jessica Grace 8:59 pm 07 May 19

The right move for our environment would be shooting 4076 humans too.

    Rastislav Zrelak Rastislav Zrelak 11:33 pm 07 May 19

    Developers 😄

    Ken Quilty Ken Quilty 12:25 am 08 May 19

    Jessica Grace start up on the big hill

    Shane Jasprizza Shane Jasprizza 12:30 am 08 May 19

    Jessica Grace volunteering?

    Sabrina Muscat Sabrina Muscat 6:47 am 08 May 19

    Jessica Grace no need, they have just deployed 5g, that should do it https://sachastone.com/5g-apocalypse-the-extinction-event/

    Mick Johnson Mick Johnson 10:05 pm 09 May 19

    you line up first since you brought up the idea

Daniel Duncan Daniel Duncan 8:04 pm 07 May 19

Do you need another person to help?

Guy Noble Guy Noble 7:50 pm 07 May 19

If they we introduced they would be classed as a pest. But because they proudly get displayed on our coat of arms its a big issue. They need culling in places all around Australia, but couldnt they be used as food instead of burying them?

    Lori J Tas Lori J Tas 9:56 pm 07 May 19

    Guy Noble they usually have lots of parasites

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 8:56 pm 08 May 19

    they do not need culling around the country, there is more than a 1000 areas where roos are extinct and that number is growing. they are far from overpopualted. only thing we have an issue with in this country is too many humans and there too stupid to change

    Benice Richmond Benice Richmond 12:46 am 09 May 19

    Guy Noble you need to check your facts mate. Or move to america because they love red necks like you and fake news

Michele Thompson Michele Thompson 7:44 pm 07 May 19

I understand why this needs to be done, however with the spread of suburbia into the pasture areas and the reduction of their natural habitat we are adding to the problem of over grazing. Can they not be moved to more sustainable areas surrounding Canberra?

    Amy LD Amy LD 7:54 pm 07 May 19

    Michele Thompson Whilst I understand where you are coming from in terms of the expansion of residential areas that have taking over the habitat of kangaroos in the ACT I also share the view that culling is necessary.

    The amount of kangaroos is seriously out of control. You only have to look along the Barton Highway at dusk, GDE, Royal Canberra Golf Course and the Nature Reserve next to Crace to see that the number are detrimental to the natural flora.

    Ronnie Cass Ronnie Cass 8:13 pm 07 May 19

    Michele Thompson - hi Michelle. We live in the Snowy Mountains adjacent to a national park and the kangaroos are in plague proportions here. We travel to our local town (Tumut) about once or twice a week and there are many dead kangaroos on the road and many more in the surrounding paddocks. Kangaroos can have an embryo on hold, one in the pouch and one on the ground at any one time. What breaks my heart is when action is not taken to control the numbers (in areas like the one I live in - surrounded by a national park). It is dreadful to see Roos trying to exist (starving really) when there is simply not enough food for the numbers. The road kill numbers out here are staggering. I am afraid that I don’t have any answers other than humane culling (which doesn’t happen here)...as the problem is virtually Australia wide.

    Michele Thompson Michele Thompson 8:20 pm 07 May 19

    Ronnie Cass Hi Ronnie thank you for your insights. It helps to know that this issue is happening in other areas and not just Canberra. I am aware that kangaroos are prodigious breeders and that culling is the most humane method to control their numbers but it still breaks my heart 😢

Ryan Sjaarda Ryan Sjaarda 7:42 pm 07 May 19

About damn time

    Benice Richmond Benice Richmond 12:49 am 09 May 19

    Ryan Sjaarda seriously.

    Ryan Sjaarda Ryan Sjaarda 8:13 am 09 May 19

    Benice 100%

    They have no natural predators, over population is a threat to their health & anyone driving near the edge of town

Brendan Wilson Brendan Wilson 7:34 pm 07 May 19

that’s a very specific number

    Dave Fuller Dave Fuller 10:53 pm 07 May 19

    They might have counted them. Then determined how many were surplus. It really isn't that complicated.......

    Troy Loughnan Troy Loughnan 3:11 am 08 May 19

    imagine jumping along with your mate and the quoter it up to 4075.......unlucky for one Kanga 😮 but he’d probably jump in front of my car anyway by accident!

    Mark Casao Mark Casao 6:22 am 08 May 19

    It's a very low number

    Martin Vidovic Martin Vidovic 9:55 am 08 May 19

    Dave Fuller counting all the kangaroos does actually seem complicated

    Ian Baird Ian Baird 12:07 am 09 May 19

    Brendan Wilson No, the kangaroos are surveyed every year to monitor their numbers. The cull numbers are set so as to reduce the population to a sustainable number i.e. about 1/ha density.

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 6:59 am 09 May 19

    the survey though is based on ridiculous logic, they guess by rainfall then mulitply. they dont take into account breeding biology at all, so the numbers will always be far over the actual popualtion. its why youll see entire areas without a single kangaroo. it makes local extinctions that drastically effect the environment and then they have such high grass the government bring in cattle for so called eco grazing. if people cant see why they are doing this, they are blind. its all about eradicating roos from the territory so farmers and housing can continue to grow.

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 7:01 am 09 May 19

    plus noone can sit there and count 3000 kangaroos. ive heard people say they have videos of thousands of roos, but when counted they have as few as 40. exxageration about roo popualtions keep the killing going

    Brendan Wilson Brendan Wilson 7:02 am 09 May 19

    Ian Baird yes, it is still a specific number

    Gogo Yubari Gogo Yubari 3:26 pm 09 May 19

    Ian Baird they use different methodology to estimate between sites and between years, they don’t have a clue how many kangaroos there actually are. Have you read the documentation for the calculation? Not a shred of evidence for 1/ha

Danes Kimber Danes Kimber 7:33 pm 07 May 19

We're living in their environment. We've ruined their homes with roads and what not and now we're killing them. It's so upsetting.

    Mark Maddock Mark Maddock 8:44 pm 07 May 19

    Dana Odegard-Forrest kangaroo numbers are in such large numbers due to us. We have given them so much more access to water for instance due to farm dams.

    Nate Jennings Nate Jennings 11:13 pm 07 May 19

    Dana Odegard-Forrest we have tipped the balance. We water golf courses, football fields, front gardens for them to eat all year round. It’s not natural, nor is the amount of kangaroos. It’s our fault there are so many.

    Paul Tye Paul Tye 10:09 am 08 May 19

    No, we've provided them artificial areas that have lead to dramatically higher numbers than they would naturally have. Better culling than letting them slowly starve to death.

    Shaun Adams Shaun Adams 8:54 pm 08 May 19

    how are they starving? plenty fo grass around, thats an old worn out excuse. the only problem we have with the environment is too many humans and too much development. stop that the ecosystem gets better. easy to blaim roos when its people causing it

Gerda Lawrence Gerda Lawrence 7:28 pm 07 May 19

Not nice for animals that are dispatched but certainly kinder for the rest. Not enough feed to sustain the current population

    Ian Baird Ian Baird 12:16 am 09 May 19

    They are doing too well! That’s the problem!

    Benice Richmond Benice Richmond 12:50 am 09 May 19

    Gerda Lawrence omg another person believing the lies. Get a mind of your own and do some research.

Kerri Hallas Kerri Hallas 7:12 pm 07 May 19

A few less on the highway will be good. The Monaro was very scary on sunrise last year... way too many accidents.

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