Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Daily flights from Canberra
to Singapore and the world

Today’s traffic story

By JD114 17 April 2008 66

Seems a colleague’s friend was driving along the Monaro Highway yesterday chatting on the old mobile (as you do) when she noticed a police car was behind her. Within a second she had mumbled gotta go and literally threw the phone down hoping against hope she had not been seen. But it was not to be, the flashing lights came on and she was pulled over.

“Do you know why I pulled you over?” the cop asked.
“Ummm yes…. because I was talking on my mobile” she replied with trepidation.
“Actually you were speeding, 98 in an 80 zone” he replied, “but now I’m going to book you for that as well!”

Net result: over $600 in fines and presumably 6 points off the old licence account as well.

Moral of the story? Well I guess it would have to be: don’t assume the cop knows you’re half as guilty as you really are!

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
66 Responses to
Today’s traffic story
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
Proud Local 11:07 am 27 Apr 08

Yes, agree completely Thumper. Most people thankfully only have brushes with the law on the road so this becomes their main focus. There is a LOT more to Policing then giving out traffic tickets unless you work for the traffic unit itself.

I don’t think it would be the best use of my time to pull over every driver that didn’t indicate, was doing 65 in in 60 zone or went through an amber light. Although if I considered any of those offences dangerous given the circumstances I certainly would.

Thumper 8:05 am 27 Apr 08

I guess that, for a lot of people, the only contact they have with police is when they have been pulled over for some sort of driving offence.

Proud Local 12:48 am 27 Apr 08

I admit, I am a bit loathe to be too honest on here, I am risking a bit by typing what I do but I am trying to be honest and constructive in what I write. I assume that the average crim does does not view this website given what I know about them. But nor do I want to give the average traffic offender some kind of advantage of knowledge of how to get away with traffic offences. Nor do I wish to give my identity away to any colleagues of superiors of mine that may visit this site.

It’s a fine line I tread I agree, but I’m trying to be helpful and make people understand our perspective. It’s like any job that you observe from the outside looking in, there is a lot more to it then meets the eye and mine is a very public career at that. I do wish to make the point that all Police have their own levels of discretion though and if in doubt, obey the law or face the potential consequences! That way you have nothing to really worry about. I’m just trying to be realistic about it and put a human perspective on it all.

minime2 11:22 pm 26 Apr 08

Respect … now there is a word for social instruction. And driving.

I go with Proud … even way back, there never was, never has been, never even suggested by any senior officer that there was/is a quota.

What it comes down to is a fair day’s work for a fair day’s pay, like any job. Sure, an officer can come in with triple the average (maybe pissant*) tickets, or just a few … just like say, a mechanic can service four cars a day and his mate alongside 10.; a brickie build a wall or his mate half-a-house. Ya do your job. Your employer will notice.

* warning … this adjective may induce convulsions in some roadusers who also use Riot.

Thumper 8:07 pm 26 Apr 08

A word of advice Hamilton.

Proud Local is a cop. He has come on here and told it how it is.

I think you can respect this.

I certainly can.

Spideydog 1:20 pm 26 Apr 08

You really don’t get sarcasim do you ant…..lol My point was, proving tailgating is harder than just “oh look tailgating, guilty”.

Rear-enders aren’t always caused by tail-gating, it can be caused by in-attention, ie driver at a safe distance behind vehicle in front, looks down for a few seconds to change radio settings, then runs into rear of vehicle in front that has stopped for some reason. This would be negligent driving, not tailgating.

I say again….To prove the offence of tail-gating observation time is needed, people will rarely tailgate for an extended period with a marked police vehicle observing. People, if they contest a tail-gating ticket can come up with all sorts of reasons and defences for being seen at that particular time travelling too close to the vehicle in front, ie un-expected closing of gap when vehicle in front braked etc, etc. Police need to observe the alleged “tail-gating” to discount these defences and also importantly, make sure that this person IS actually tail-gating. IT IS NOT THAT SIMPLE.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site