Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Community

Charity and fundraising auctions for the Canberra community

A Look around Canberra: Gungahlin

By Alexandra Craig - 12 February 2016 80

IMG_7506

This week I’m heading back up the GDE (or via Northbourne and Flemington Road, depending on which you prefer) to my first hometown in Canberra: Gungahlin. The suburb of Gungahlin is named after the Aboriginal word meaning ‘white man’s house’ or ‘little rocky hill’. It was originally spelt ‘Goongarline’.

I moved here back in 2011 when I was a brand new jellybean to Canberra and thought ’20 minutes seems like a reasonable time to travel to work.’ Unfortunately no one told me about the GDE roadworks (probably because I didn’t know a single soul here) and some days it would take me 45-50+ minutes to get to work. I saw out my 12 month lease and then high-tailed it out of there.

The above paragraph comes with a big ‘however’, because although I moved, I actually didn’t mind Gungahlin. It’s a pretty nice place and I found that most people were generally quite friendly and community oriented. Sadly the same can’t be said for other parts of Canberra that I’ve lived in.

It’s no secret that Gungahlin is booming. I probably head up there every couple of months and am always astounded as to how different it looks to the last time I visited, and even moreso how much it’s changed in the last 5 years. I had zero friends for a period of time after moving here so I used to spend my weekends doing a lot of walking, so I feel like I’ve seen all of Gungahlin on foot. I visited a couple of weeks ago and there’s a giant Bunnings Warehouse smack bang where there was a vacant block what seemed like 3 months ago. It popped up out of nowhere!

IMG_7503

Hibberson Street, the main drag of Gungahlin, is a bit of a hot issue at the moment. Local MLA Meegan Fitzharris is pushing for Hibberson Street to become closed to vehicular traffic, a pedestrian only zone. She ran a survey recently and there was a strong show of support for her proposal. I have to say that I agree, and I think it’s a great idea. That street was quite congested with traffic when I lived around the corner in 2011, and it’s even worse now. I also think closing it off to traffic would open up the possibility of Gungahlin having their very own Sunday markets, and would also allow for the local restaurants to open up more al-fresco dining options.

One of my favourite parts of Gungahlin is Yerrabi Pond. Not only is it a lovely spot for a picnic (there’s also communal BBQs available) or an afternoon walk or cycle with your leashed dog, but it’s also great for kids with a playground and flying fox – I wish I wasn’t too tall for the flying fox!

Quick Stats

Street theme: Industrialists, aspects of industry, and Gungahlin district pioneers.
Federal Electorate: Fraser
Federal MP: Andrew Leigh
Territory Electorate: Molonglo
Population: 5617
Population breakdown: 49.5 per cent male, 50.5 per cent female
Average children per family: 1.8<
Crime: 720 incidents in 2015 (not including traffic infringements)

IMG_7510

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
80 Responses to
A Look around Canberra: Gungahlin
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
dungfungus 9:24 pm 02 Mar 16

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

17,433 people according to the last CENSUS Working Population, however, I would reduce this number a bit to take account of those who are currently stay at home mums, students and Unemployed. However this Journey To Work number also excludes, tradies, contractors, school age students and elderly who have to go to Civic so that may bump it back up a little.

ANU has 20,000 students alone (not all on Campus) and Civic and surrounds has about 65-70,000 regular workers, plus all the tradies, consultants etc who do not have regular office sites there. Considering the Tuggeranong population is just below a quarter of the ACTs total population, but a larger proportion of the Working Age Population these numbers roughly make sense.

I think you are trying to muddy the water to increase the ratio above 10%.
If you are correct in those workforce numbers that means 62,260 residents of Tuggeranong are “workers” (seems very high number to me) and 17,433 of them work in Civic. Let’s adjust that figure down one sixth for reality as most would be public servants who only work 10 months of every year when leave/sickies/etc. are factored in so they don’t travel on those days.
This leaves about 14,500 and while you are correct that ANU has 20,000 students most of them are foreign and I doubt if any live in Tuggeranong due to the distance from the campus.
So, lets say that the 14,500 odd are joined by some others to make 15,000 a day travelling to Civic and as 100,000 people are resident in Tuggeranong then 15% of them travel to Civic every day.
Clearly I was very wrong so I apologise again for exaggerating.

Can you provide a link where you got the figure for the the numbers of workers resident in Tuggereanong because my research with ABS says the labour force in 2011 was 51,396.

madelini 3:26 pm 02 Mar 16

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Forgive me if I, like many other people, choose to enjoy the best offerings of our city than the Coffee Club at the Hyperdome. Or, are those aspects just for the privileged few who earn above $80k/annum and live in a 12km radius of the City Centre? Some of us are also not lucky enough to have all friends and family living in the same part of Canberra, but still enjoy being able to catch up in person.

Some things are worth the slight increase in expense.

As I said, a choice not a need. I live within 12kms of the city centre and don’t go to civic twice a week. I would likely go less than once a month. I also can’t afford to eat out twice a week, and my income I would guess, if you can afford to eat out twice a week, is much lower than yours; certainly much lower than “$80k/annum”.

By that logic, no one aside from the people who live in Acton, Reid and Braddon (the end not near the supermarket) would ever “need” to go into the City. To experience Canberra and what it has to offer (including night life, events such as the Multicultural Festival and performances at any of the theatres), or as a more centralised place in which to meet friends and family, then most people – even those living at the fringes – do “need” to go to the City to contribute to their enjoyment and quality of life.

Perhaps if you lived further out than within the 12km radius, you would also be able to afford to go out and enjoy the social aspects of the city centre?

Maya123 12:44 pm 02 Mar 16

madelini said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Forgive me if I, like many other people, choose to enjoy the best offerings of our city than the Coffee Club at the Hyperdome. Or, are those aspects just for the privileged few who earn above $80k/annum and live in a 12km radius of the City Centre? Some of us are also not lucky enough to have all friends and family living in the same part of Canberra, but still enjoy being able to catch up in person.

Some things are worth the slight increase in expense.

As I said, a choice not a need. I live within 12kms of the city centre and don’t go to civic twice a week. I would likely go less than once a month. I also can’t afford to eat out twice a week, and my income I would guess, if you can afford to eat out twice a week, is much lower than yours; certainly much lower than “$80k/annum”.

dungfungus 12:19 pm 02 Mar 16

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

17,433 people according to the last CENSUS Working Population, however, I would reduce this number a bit to take account of those who are currently stay at home mums, students and Unemployed. However this Journey To Work number also excludes, tradies, contractors, school age students and elderly who have to go to Civic so that may bump it back up a little.

ANU has 20,000 students alone (not all on Campus) and Civic and surrounds has about 65-70,000 regular workers, plus all the tradies, consultants etc who do not have regular office sites there. Considering the Tuggeranong population is just below a quarter of the ACTs total population, but a larger proportion of the Working Age Population these numbers roughly make sense.

I think you are trying to muddy the water to increase the ratio above 10%.
If you are correct in those workforce numbers that means 62,260 residents of Tuggeranong are “workers” (seems very high number to me) and 17,433 of them work in Civic. Let’s adjust that figure down one sixth for reality as most would be public servants who only work 10 months of every year when leave/sickies/etc. are factored in so they don’t travel on those days.
This leaves about 14,500 and while you are correct that ANU has 20,000 students most of them are foreign and I doubt if any live in Tuggeranong due to the distance from the campus.
So, lets say that the 14,500 odd are joined by some others to make 15,000 a day travelling to Civic and as 100,000 people are resident in Tuggeranong then 15% of them travel to Civic every day.
Clearly I was very wrong so I apologise again for exaggerating.

bj_ACT 10:32 am 02 Mar 16

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

17,433 people according to the last CENSUS Working Population, however, I would reduce this number a bit to take account of those who are currently stay at home mums, students and Unemployed. However this Journey To Work number also excludes, tradies, contractors, school age students and elderly who have to go to Civic so that may bump it back up a little.

ANU has 20,000 students alone (not all on Campus) and Civic and surrounds has about 65-70,000 regular workers, plus all the tradies, consultants etc who do not have regular office sites there. Considering the Tuggeranong population is just below a quarter of the ACTs total population, but a larger proportion of the Working Age Population these numbers roughly make sense.

dungfungus 8:10 am 02 Mar 16

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

bj_ACT 5:30 pm 01 Mar 16

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

dungfungus 1:24 pm 01 Mar 16

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

bj_ACT 11:55 am 01 Mar 16

rubaiyat said :

You didn’t mention the snowy mountains highway.

Didn’t fit the theme of Tuggeranong neglect?

You’ll have to explain what you mean????

rubaiyat 6:33 pm 29 Feb 16

You didn’t mention the snowy mountains highway.

Didn’t fit the theme of Tuggeranong neglect?

rommeldog56 5:44 pm 29 Feb 16

bj_ACT said :

So you mean Horse Park Drive is due for duplication ahead of Tuggers roads? The road that has less average daily usage according to traffic volume stats than the single lane Tuggeranong roads of:
Ashley Drive 23,300 per day
Erindale Drive 20,050 per day
Isabella Drive 19,850 per day
Horse Park Drive 15,350 per day

Mind you Horse Park Drive gets a lot more use than a lot of already duplicated roads in Belconnen and North Canberra.

Of course – thats what i would expect. Gunners is ACT labor heartland. Also, the MLA who replaced the beloved Katy Gallagher, Megan Fitzharris, is an active MLA, has sponsored petitions for road duplication & improvements in Gunners and actively lobbies for that – despite the soon to arrive Tram !

I wonder if that is a lesson in effective representation for the ineffective, apparently uncaring and/or apathetic Tuggeranong Labor MLAs !!! Nah, probably not………!

Postalgeek 1:44 pm 29 Feb 16

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

nazasaurus 1:33 pm 29 Feb 16

Used to live in Gungahlin and certainly wont be back. While it might appeal to certain families or budgets, I cant help but shake my head that we accept such poor planning and development by our government and don’t demand better. The cramped block sizes, uncut grass, lack of trees, lack of shaded areas, poor building standards (thank to self regulation by the industry instead of our government protecting us from charlatans) ugly architecture (concrete cube with splash of lime anyone), 50 minute drive to work and if you like a social life spending your entire life commuting to other parts of Canberra. The positives are the town centre, while fugly is practical, you can get lots done in one go.

madelini 1:29 pm 29 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Not all the wealthy people live in Forrest.

Of course they don’t. That said, the largest concentration of Canberra’s wealthiest people live in the Inner South (Forrest, Red Hill, Kingston, Griffith, Yarralulma, Deakin) and the Inner North (Reid, Campbell, Turner, O’Connor, Ainslie). Not to dispute that there are wealthy people living elsewhere – even Kambah has Gleneagles.

But at the end of the day, to say that the City does not belong to people who live further out not by choice but because the cost of rent and property prices is prohibitive to those who don’t earn much (and god forbid, are single and trying to do anything without a co-investor or housemate) is shortchanging both them and the notion of having a CBD/central cultural precinct.

bj_ACT 12:19 pm 29 Feb 16

JC said :

David M said :

Anyway, I quite like it. It’s just a shame that it’s a tough place to get out of in the morning, and back into in the afternoon. Apart from some of the roadworks on Gungahlin Drive, which are a temporary inconvenience, the Majura Parkway does a wonderful job, pity that Horse Park Drive wasn’t similarly widened to take the traffic. Funny about the way the ACT Government goes about its traffic planning, shifting choke points from one place to another.

They duplicate when the demand is there, and Horse Park Drive the demand is now there.

But interesting what you say about planning, go to Molonglo and the main road there has been built as dual carriage way, despite demand not needing it. Personally think it is a good way to go, but google it on these boards and you will find people whinging about dual carriageway roads to nowhere. Government can never win hey?

So you mean Horse Park Drive is due for duplication ahead of Tuggers roads? The road that has less average daily usage according to traffic volume stats than the single lane Tuggeranong roads of:
Ashley Drive 23,300 per day
Erindale Drive 20,050 per day
Isabella Drive 19,850 per day
Horse Park Drive 15,350 per day

Mind you Horse Park Drive gets a lot more use than a lot of already duplicated roads in Belconnen and North Canberra.

JC 11:04 am 29 Feb 16

David M said :

Anyway, I quite like it. It’s just a shame that it’s a tough place to get out of in the morning, and back into in the afternoon. Apart from some of the roadworks on Gungahlin Drive, which are a temporary inconvenience, the Majura Parkway does a wonderful job, pity that Horse Park Drive wasn’t similarly widened to take the traffic. Funny about the way the ACT Government goes about its traffic planning, shifting choke points from one place to another.

They duplicate when the demand is there, and Horse Park Drive the demand is now there.

But interesting what you say about planning, go to Molonglo and the main road there has been built as dual carriage way, despite demand not needing it. Personally think it is a good way to go, but google it on these boards and you will find people whinging about dual carriageway roads to nowhere. Government can never win hey?

madelini 9:48 am 29 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

dungfungus 11:12 am 28 Feb 16

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Not all the wealthy people live in Forrest.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site