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ACT driver behaviour ‘alarming’, ‘reckless’ and ‘beyond comprehension’

By Charlotte Harper - 12 January 2017 29

Police wrap

ACT Policing have issued a statement expressing concern at “alarming driver behaviour so far in 2017” saying the number of drivers caught doing the wrong thing so far was “beyond comprehension”, and citing examples including the discovery of a driver on the road with a child under the age of four unrestrained.

“ACT Policing is disappointed with the disregard shown on our roads already this year,” the statement reads.

“The first 11 days of 2017 has seen ACT Policing’s Traffic Operations Team issue more than 480 Traffic Infringement Notices and Cautions, with several of these being for high range speeding.

“One driver was caught travelling 98km/h over the posted speed limit, driving at 178km/h on Belconnen Way in Macquarie.

“Further high range speeding infringements included;

151km/h in a 90km/h zone
99km/h in a 60km/h zone
135km/h in a 80km/h zone
126km/h in a 60km/h zone
99km/h in a 40km/h zone”

According to the statement, Acting Officer in Charge of Traffic, Station Sergeant Ken Hedges said this behaviour was not good enough.

“These high range speeders all local Canberra drivers putting themselves and members of their own community at risk,” he said.

“They show a complete disregard for the road rules and take zero responsibility for road safety.”

ACT Policing officers have also issued infringements including but not limited to driving while uninsured, driving while using a mobile phone, illegal U-turns, negligent driving and driving with a child under 4-years-old unrestrained.

“This type of behaviour is reckless as it can have such disastrous consequences. Think of your own friends and family and how you feel about putting them at risk,” Station Sergeant Hedges said.

What’s Your opinion?


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29 Responses to
ACT driver behaviour ‘alarming’, ‘reckless’ and ‘beyond comprehension’
1
Paul Costigan 11:32 am
12 Jan 17
#

There is definitely something in the air – besides a lot of heat. Having spent most of the last few weeks here in Canberra I have observed the roads to have been quieter but also noticed that the mad drivers have come out in force – and I exclude in that any criticism of the usual meandering tourists. It is not just the high speed ones who are a nuisance – and the police are correct, there are many of them at the moment. There seems to be extras out there who have forgotten so many of the basics including to be polite and patient. If you need to drive right now – I suggest be extra careful and be prepared to not get annoyed yourself when confronted with the stupidity of so many.

2
dungfungus 11:46 am
12 Jan 17
#

It’s past time to start using first offence custodial sentences as a deterrent to this type of behaviour.

3
K_c24 12:20 pm
12 Jan 17
#

Can you really reprimand the whole of Canberra for poor driving during the first 11 days of the year given that Summernats is on for three of those days? Kind of skews the data set quite substantially.

4
nealg 12:27 pm
12 Jan 17
#

Wonder what the score was over the Summernats weekend?
Certainly was evidence of increased hoon activity with fresh burnout marks around town.
Although just over the border the part of the old Federal Hwy at the entrance to the Eaglehawk Holiday Park is covered in them.
Just takes one idiot to get out control to ruin the lives of others.

5
Reprobate 3:27 pm
12 Jan 17
#

So, how’s that expanded speed camera network (anticipated in the budget to increase revenue flows to the Gov’t each year) going with modifying driver behaviours and reducing speeds across Canberra?

6
Maryann Mussared 4:03 pm
12 Jan 17
#

And what about that alarming statistic of nearly one in three drivers drugs tested over the Christmas New Year period testing positive to drugs?

7
bikhet 4:51 pm
12 Jan 17
#

Maryann Mussared said :

And what about that alarming statistic of nearly one in three drivers drugs tested over the Christmas New Year period testing positive to drugs?

Yes, one third of Canberra drivers are dope fiends – either that or all Canberra drivers are dope fiends one third of the time.

More seriously, this is one of those statistics that is essentially meaningless. If you don’t know the sampling methodology you don’t know much. It might be that the drivers tested for drugs had already been pulled over for other reasons, and that before the drug test police had reason to suspect that the drivers were influenced by drugs and so tested them.

8
Maryann Mussared 6:56 pm
13 Jan 17
#

bikhet said :

Maryann Mussared said :

And what about that alarming statistic of nearly one in three drivers drugs tested over the Christmas New Year period testing positive to drugs?

Yes, one third of Canberra drivers are dope fiends – either that or all Canberra drivers are dope fiends one third of the time.

More seriously, this is one of those statistics that is essentially meaningless. If you don’t know the sampling methodology you don’t know much. It might be that the drivers tested for drugs had already been pulled over for other reasons, and that before the drug test police had reason to suspect that the drivers were influenced by drugs and so tested them.

I do agree with what you say about understanding the methodology and it is a good question to ask about statistics thrown out in a media release. But it is just a teensy bit frightening that those deranged hoons who undertake you or overtake and pull in quickly just might – perhaps – be under the influence of drugs. The article I read sounded as though DUI was pretty much under control, which of course we all know if not the case.

9
dungfungus 10:35 am
14 Jan 17
#

There have been long delays on the GDE where they are applying the “el-cheapo chip and perpetually sticky tar” on the carriageway.

This necessitates funnelling traffic into one lane but most Canberra drivers ignore that sign and charge on until the work being undertaken forces them to merge aggressively.

Paul is right – the mad drivers are out in force.

10
Laurel 1:41 pm
15 Jan 17
#

Maryann Mussared said :

And what about that alarming statistic of nearly one in three drivers drugs tested over the Christmas New Year period testing positive to drugs?

Random drug testing needs to be stopped right away as it is a badly flawed instrument.

Even though the facts of the effects of alcohol on driving were long ago established, it took ages for random breath testing to be introduced. In contrast, there is very little reliable evidence on the effect of drugs on driving, and much of what is presented as evidence by lawmakers to support their methods concerns mixed drugs and alcohol, and not drugs by themselves.

In addition, if one has a prescription for certain drugs, then it is not considered an offence, so there are reasons for seeing the random drug testing not as an accident-preventing tool, but rather a roadside morals test, as it only applies to illegal drugs.

Test for alcohol and leave it at that, as that is where the danger lies. Testing for drugs, at least until reliable blood levels are established, is a massive overreach by the authorities and should be subject to a moratorium.

11
rommeldog56 7:47 am
16 Jan 17
#

Laurel said :

Random drug testing needs to be stopped right away as it is a badly flawed instrument.

Even though the facts of the effects of alcohol on driving were long ago established, it took ages for random breath testing to be introduced. In contrast, there is very little reliable evidence on the effect of drugs on driving, and much of what is presented as evidence by lawmakers to support their methods concerns mixed drugs and alcohol, and not drugs by themselves.

Surely u carnt be serious. What evidence do u need other to watch and listen to people affected by illegal drugs such as Ice and dope who are out and about. Clearly many of those are not capable of driving a car.

I congratulate the police for random drug testing of drivers. There should be more of it. It keeps all other people on the road that little bit safer.

12
dungfungus 9:12 am
16 Jan 17
#

rommeldog56 said :

Laurel said :

Random drug testing needs to be stopped right away as it is a badly flawed instrument.

Even though the facts of the effects of alcohol on driving were long ago established, it took ages for random breath testing to be introduced. In contrast, there is very little reliable evidence on the effect of drugs on driving, and much of what is presented as evidence by lawmakers to support their methods concerns mixed drugs and alcohol, and not drugs by themselves.

Surely u carnt be serious. What evidence do u need other to watch and listen to people affected by illegal drugs such as Ice and dope who are out and about. Clearly many of those are not capable of driving a car.

I congratulate the police for random drug testing of drivers. There should be more of it. It keeps all other people on the road that little bit safer.

Under the new regime in the Philippines, drivers who are detected driving cars on drugs may be summarily executed.

Imagine that happening in Canberra.

13
tim_c 12:46 pm
16 Jan 17
#

Why should we be so surprised that people show little regard for the road rules – our government has spent the last few years demonstrating that the road rules don’t need to be obeyed eg. driving with fog lights on in clear weather, parking on nature strips or footpaths, driving an unroadworthy vehicle, cyclists (and pedestrians) crossing against the red light – even the ridiculous increase of speedbumps in ACT demonstrates that you’re no longer expected to obey the posted speed limit, you only have to slow down at certain critical points.

While I’m not necessarily saying we should fine everyone who uses their foglights in clear weather, or parks on nature strips or blocking footpaths, but if it’s really not such a problem, then why are these things still illegal? If they are illegal, and the ACT government does nothing about drivers who break those laws, what message does that send other than “you can pick and choose which road rules (if any) you want to obey”?

14
HenryBG 1:18 pm
16 Jan 17
#

They wouldn’t graduate to endangering lives driving at high speed if the police adopted a “broken windows” approach and pulled-over & fined every single person for every single minor infraction instead of turning a blind eye to improper use of lights, fail to indicate, tail-gating, etc…
They speed dangerously, because they’ ve learned that nobody is enforcing the road rules.

15
Laurel 2:20 pm
16 Jan 17
#

rommeldog56 said :

Laurel said :

Random drug testing needs to be stopped right away as it is a badly flawed instrument.

Even though the facts of the effects of alcohol on driving were long ago established, it took ages for random breath testing to be introduced. In contrast, there is very little reliable evidence on the effect of drugs on driving, and much of what is presented as evidence by lawmakers to support their methods concerns mixed drugs and alcohol, and not drugs by themselves.

Surely u carnt be serious. What evidence do u need other to watch and listen to people affected by illegal drugs such as Ice and dope who are out and about. Clearly many of those are not capable of driving a car.

I congratulate the police for random drug testing of drivers. There should be more of it. It keeps all other people on the road that little bit safer.

If people are affected by amphetamines or cannabis, then they should be booked, but to do this lawfully, there first needs to be established blood chemical limits for these substances above which driving ability is demonstrably impaired – just as it is for alcohol.

At this point, there are no reliable guides as to the safe limits, so booking drivers for ANY drugs in their system is unfair and amounts to little more than fishing expeditions better associated with authoritariane types of government.

The police have far too much power to abuse in this respect, and the legislators that put these laws on the books need to hear about it. The random drug tests as they stand are unacceptable in a free society.

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