Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Excellence in Public Sector consulting

And it’s 8/8/1. Negotiations to follow

By johnboy - 27 October 2012 99

Despite certain democracy hating tree killers trying to call the election result two days before people actually got to vote it has turned into a monumentally close affair.

Elections ACT have the final allocation of seats:

Brindabella

* Zed Seselja

* Joy Burch

* Brendan Smyth

* Mick Gentleman

* Andrew Wall

Ginninderra

* Alistair Coe

* Vicki Dunne

* Mary Porter

* Chris Bourke

* Yvette Berry

Molonglo

* Katy Gallagher

* Jeremy Hanson

* Andrew Barr

* Simon Corbell

* Shane Rattenbury

* Giulia Jones

* Steve Doszpot

Shane Rattenbury to decide what happens next.

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
99 Responses to
And it’s 8/8/1. Negotiations to follow
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
5
watto23 2:24 pm 31 Oct 12

Aeek said :

watto23 said :

Another interesting fact, that I picked up before the election is that candidates ran for seats, they didn’t even live in. As a result of the election not a single MLA actually lives in Gungahlin.

Two ways to look at this, the system allows for people to change electorates but not their home address. Also the people in the electorate of Ginninderra (Mostly Gungahlin)

Ginninderra electorate is all of Belconnen + Hall, Nicholls, Palmerston and Crace. Kalleen is also a fringe case. No surprises that all the members come from the Belconnen majority and none from Gungahlin.

Molonglo is the same, Gungahlin is still in the minority even though the electorate includes most of Gungahlin.

Yes got that mixed up…. point is that candidates moved to other electorates so the parties had the best chance of winning. ala Zed. However there is no actual representation of the region. A politician will always look after thei backyard first 🙂

I think 5 electorates of 5 would allow for a few more pollies to get things done, plus a decent representation of the region. yes those on the the borders of the satellite towns might still get grouped the the neighbouring town, but it would allow for more flexibility with the electoral boundaries.

HenryBG 12:57 pm 31 Oct 12

Jethro said :

HenryBG said :

Sadly, like many prejudices, yours is utterly wrong:

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/independent-schools-are-bastions-of-equality-and-tolerance-20091123-it24.html

The report states, “only 53.9 per cent of participants from Catholic secondary schools reported being subjected to racist treatment, whilst over 76 per cent of students from both types of government schools indicated experiencing some form of racist treatment”.

Additional evidence that Catholic and independent schools successfully promote social cohesion and tolerance is found in an analysis of the 2005 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes by education commentator Andrew Norton.

That’s not what my post was about HenryBG… I was referring to the simple fact that kids in independent schools primarily come from middle to high income families that value education, whereas public schools have kids from across the spectrum –

Oh dear, still getting it wrong with your unjusitifed prejudices:

From the same link I provided:

“t should also be noted that the social composition of Catholic school communities largely mirrors that of government schools. Instead of only serving the privileged, many Catholic schools exist in low socio-economic communities with a strong multicultural profiile.”

Wasn’t hard to walk you into that one, I must say.

Aeek 12:51 pm 31 Oct 12

watto23 said :

Another interesting fact, that I picked up before the election is that candidates ran for seats, they didn’t even live in. As a result of the election not a single MLA actually lives in Gungahlin.

Two ways to look at this, the system allows for people to change electorates but not their home address. Also the people in the electorate of Ginninderra (Mostly Gungahlin)

Ginninderra electorate is all of Belconnen + Hall, Nicholls, Palmerston and Crace. Kalleen is also a fringe case. No surprises that all the members come from the Belconnen majority and none from Gungahlin.

Molonglo is the same, Gungahlin is still in the minority even though the electorate includes most of Gungahlin.

maxblues 12:44 pm 31 Oct 12

johnboy said :

And now it’s official.

(Note to the idiot academic who called me a bozo on Twitter when she was incorrectly claiming an 8/7/2 split to be “official” the day after the election)

Which clown called you a bozo?

johnboy 12:23 pm 31 Oct 12

And now it’s official.

(Note to the idiot academic who called me a bozo on Twitter when she was incorrectly claiming an 8/7/2 split to be “official” the day after the election)

DrKoresh 12:15 pm 31 Oct 12

Thumper said :

Jim Jones said :

DrKoresh said :

HenryBG said :

You seem to be trying to mislead about the Greens’ policies.

The ALP were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Libs were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Greens were putting $5 million extra into education, all of it aimed at addressing the needs of disabled gay black whales.

I’ve bolded the two important bits, my god you’re a silly person.

It’s not really a valid argument unless you’re accusing someone of being a communist and eating mung-beans now, is it?

The real question here is, ‘do communists eat mung beans?’

And if so, then why?

I would say ‘yes’ on the grounds that the Chinese are (supposedly) communist and because mung beans sound like something they eat in China.

Thumper 12:08 pm 31 Oct 12

Jim Jones said :

DrKoresh said :

HenryBG said :

You seem to be trying to mislead about the Greens’ policies.

The ALP were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Libs were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Greens were putting $5 million extra into education, all of it aimed at addressing the needs of disabled gay black whales.

I’ve bolded the two important bits, my god you’re a silly person.

It’s not really a valid argument unless you’re accusing someone of being a communist and eating mung-beans now, is it?

The real question here is, ‘do communists eat mung beans?’

And if so, then why?

Jim Jones 11:31 am 31 Oct 12

DrKoresh said :

HenryBG said :

You seem to be trying to mislead about the Greens’ policies.

The ALP were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Libs were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Greens were putting $5 million extra into education, all of it aimed at addressing the needs of disabled gay black whales.

I’ve bolded the two important bits, my god you’re a silly person.

It’s not really a valid argument unless you’re accusing someone of being a communist and eating mung-beans now, is it?

DrKoresh 11:23 am 31 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

You seem to be trying to mislead about the Greens’ policies.

The ALP were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Libs were putting $50 million extra into education, including addressing the funding disparity that affects non-government students.
The Greens were putting $5 million extra into education, all of it aimed at addressing the needs of disabled gay black whales.

I’ve bolded the two important bits, my god you’re a silly person.

devils_advocate 11:17 am 31 Oct 12

Jethro said :

That’s not what my post was about HenryBG… I was referring to the simple fact that kids in independent schools primarily come from middle to high income families that value education, whereas public schools have kids from across the spectrum – kids whose parents are junkies, refugees who have been in country for a couple of months and have next to no English language skills, kids with high level learning difficulties and disabilities, kids who have been excluded from independent schools because they refuse to do their school work.

The kids in independent schools almost all would succeed in education wherever they go. It is far less the school that causes their success, but their background. Indeed, if you were to look at only the public school kids who matched the socio-economic profile of the kids from the local independent schools you would see very little difference in educational outcomes. Indeed, you might actually see the public school kids achieving more long-term educational success. Multiple studies have shown the public school students who go on to university have a lower drop-out rate than private school kids.

It is not that public schools or private schools offer anything all that different in the way of learning programs or educational opportunities, but that public schools have all the kids who independent schools will not cater for.

This is BS. Yes, background is important, yes, individual ability is important, but not to the exclusion of all other factors. Good schools impact on performance.

Also, attending a private school doesn’t guarantee academic success – consistent with the above, it can only make the situation for the individual better than it otherwise would be. Plenty of independent schools have remedial education programs and allow students to focus on vocational training prior to leaving after year 10, to go to CIT.

watto23 10:00 am 31 Oct 12

Another interesting fact, that I picked up before the election is that candidates ran for seats, they didn’t even live in. As a result of the election not a single MLA actually lives in Gungahlin.

Two ways to look at this, the system allows for people to change electorates but not their home address. Also the people in the electorate of Ginninderra (Mostly Gungahlin) didn’t care to check if the members they voted for actually lived in Gungahlin, they just voted along party lines like sheep.

So if residents of Gungahlin get a bad rub of the green in the next 4 years, who is to blame?

I know I certainly didn’t votemy top 5 preferences in Brindabella to anyone who didn’t live here and would ultimately understand the issues here.

LegalNut 9:34 am 31 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

LegalNut said :

HenryBG said :

Jim Jones said :

My neighbours invited me to a dinner party, but I don’t like their cooking, so I went to a restaurant instead.

My neighbours haven’t invited me to any dinner party.

My neighbours and I have each put $50 in the kitty to arrange a meal.

The people arranging the meal are dumb bogans who think Maccas drive-thru is suitable (or maybe they’re vegans), so I’d like my $50 to be used to provide a decent meal which I will source from a different provider.

Keep trying though, Jim, you’ll get the hang of this analogy-thingie one of these days.

No Henry. My neighbours and I have each put $50 into the pot to arrange a healthy and nutritious but simple meal for the children of the neighbourhood to eat.

The people organising the meal have sorted out something that will do the job perfectly well.

False.
They have come up with a very substandard option which is woefully inedequate given the money they are spending. (The neighourhood meals system demonstrated it operates at only 30% of the efficiency of the alternative system).
And every year they have to devalue standards further in order to simulate continued success.
Is it necessary to point out that discipline at these meals is nonexistent, and in fact very little proper eating ever gets done?

Other choices exist which provided a much more nutricious meal.

LegalNut said :

If you want to go to a dinner where everything is gold plated or they aren’t serving pork or you need your airy-fairy vegan food, you can go and pay for it. Yes, you aren’t getting all of your $50 back.

No, we choose not to submit to an inferior and unhealthy menu and we’re getting $8.50 back. That’s it. The neighbours get the $50, we don’t impose any costs on them, and we get just $8.50 back.
Very good value if anybody knows how to do sums.

The ALP and Labor have said we should get $12.50 back. The Greens don’t care.

The problem for you is that by any objective measure, public schools are fine. I went through public schools and came out the other end of ANU with a law degree. The fact is that public schools do provide high levels of education even if some don’t want to accept it. In fact, I would argue that the college system for senior secondary education provides a higher level of education than the private institutions.

Yes, there are some limited exceptions when it comes to children with special educational needs but the independent sector doesn’t do a stellar job there either.

As for your last point, you are mistaken on two fronts. First, you don’t count the federal contribution to private education in your $8.50 which is higher than what the feds provide the public sector. You also miss the point that a significant part of the population get back nothing because they don’t have kids. Like all government services it is inherently redistributive. If you don’t want to use the government service, pay for it.

    johnboy 9:39 am 31 Oct 12

    OK guys. That’s enough about education.

    I gather tax reform is the main agenda at the moment.

davo101 9:03 am 31 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/independent-schools-are-bastions-of-equality-and-tolerance-20091123-it24.html

The report states, “only 53.9 per cent of participants from Catholic secondary schools reported being subjected to racist treatment, whilst over 76 per cent of students from both types of government schools indicated experiencing some form of racist treatment”.

Yeah, if you’re trying to make a point it’s best not to refer to rubbish research. If you look at the report it doesn’t give a breakdown of the background of the participants by school type. The result could be entirely due to the fact that the Catholic schools were 100% “Anglo” (you don’t know because they don’t say).

Plus I think the percentages are too low. If you look at their definition of a racist act it includes: heard or read comments stereotyping your cultural group?. Now I’ve watched Top Gear so I’d have to answer yes (being called a convict by Jeremy Clarkson falls into the category of stereotyping). So maybe we can interpret the study results as suggesting students from Catholic schools consume media less widely than their government school colleagues?

HenryBG said :

Andrew Norton.

I’ve read Andrew Norton’s blog for many years. I think his head would explode before he’d admit that the government sector could do anything nearly as well as the private.

Jethro 7:52 am 31 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

Jethro said :

Actually, there are two dinner parties eating very similar meals and enjoying a friendly trivia night. One party has to invite and accept every kid in the neighbourhood, including the intellectually disabled and non-English speakers . The other one selects and chooses which kids get to go to their party and occasionally kicks kids out of their party if they’re not going well at the trivia questions. The selective dinner party wins the trivia competition and asserts it must be because they prepared a better meal than the other party.

Geez, it really helps, when you go ans display an ignorant prejudice, if you can at least base it on reality.

Sadly, like many prejudices, yours is utterly wrong:

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/independent-schools-are-bastions-of-equality-and-tolerance-20091123-it24.html

The report states, “only 53.9 per cent of participants from Catholic secondary schools reported being subjected to racist treatment, whilst over 76 per cent of students from both types of government schools indicated experiencing some form of racist treatment”.

Additional evidence that Catholic and independent schools successfully promote social cohesion and tolerance is found in an analysis of the 2005 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes by education commentator Andrew Norton.

That’s not what my post was about HenryBG… I was referring to the simple fact that kids in independent schools primarily come from middle to high income families that value education, whereas public schools have kids from across the spectrum – kids whose parents are junkies, refugees who have been in country for a couple of months and have next to no English language skills, kids with high level learning difficulties and disabilities, kids who have been excluded from independent schools because they refuse to do their school work.

The kids in independent schools almost all would succeed in education wherever they go. It is far less the school that causes their success, but their background. Indeed, if you were to look at only the public school kids who matched the socio-economic profile of the kids from the local independent schools you would see very little difference in educational outcomes. Indeed, you might actually see the public school kids achieving more long-term educational success. Multiple studies have shown the public school students who go on to university have a lower drop-out rate than private school kids.

It is not that public schools or private schools offer anything all that different in the way of learning programs or educational opportunities, but that public schools have all the kids who independent schools will not cater for.

HenryBG 6:32 am 31 Oct 12

Jethro said :

Actually, there are two dinner parties eating very similar meals and enjoying a friendly trivia night. One party has to invite and accept every kid in the neighbourhood, including the intellectually disabled and non-English speakers . The other one selects and chooses which kids get to go to their party and occasionally kicks kids out of their party if they’re not going well at the trivia questions. The selective dinner party wins the trivia competition and asserts it must be because they prepared a better meal than the other party.

Geez, it really helps, when you go ans display an ignorant prejudice, if you can at least base it on reality.

Sadly, like many prejudices, yours is utterly wrong:

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/independent-schools-are-bastions-of-equality-and-tolerance-20091123-it24.html

The report states, “only 53.9 per cent of participants from Catholic secondary schools reported being subjected to racist treatment, whilst over 76 per cent of students from both types of government schools indicated experiencing some form of racist treatment”.

Additional evidence that Catholic and independent schools successfully promote social cohesion and tolerance is found in an analysis of the 2005 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes by education commentator Andrew Norton.

HenryBG 6:25 am 31 Oct 12

LegalNut said :

HenryBG said :

Jim Jones said :

My neighbours invited me to a dinner party, but I don’t like their cooking, so I went to a restaurant instead.

My neighbours haven’t invited me to any dinner party.

My neighbours and I have each put $50 in the kitty to arrange a meal.

The people arranging the meal are dumb bogans who think Maccas drive-thru is suitable (or maybe they’re vegans), so I’d like my $50 to be used to provide a decent meal which I will source from a different provider.

Keep trying though, Jim, you’ll get the hang of this analogy-thingie one of these days.

No Henry. My neighbours and I have each put $50 into the pot to arrange a healthy and nutritious but simple meal for the children of the neighbourhood to eat.

The people organising the meal have sorted out something that will do the job perfectly well.

False.
They have come up with a very substandard option which is woefully inedequate given the money they are spending. (The neighourhood meals system demonstrated it operates at only 30% of the efficiency of the alternative system).
And every year they have to devalue standards further in order to simulate continued success.
Is it necessary to point out that discipline at these meals is nonexistent, and in fact very little proper eating ever gets done?

Other choices exist which provided a much more nutricious meal.

LegalNut said :

If you want to go to a dinner where everything is gold plated or they aren’t serving pork or you need your airy-fairy vegan food, you can go and pay for it. Yes, you aren’t getting all of your $50 back.

No, we choose not to submit to an inferior and unhealthy menu and we’re getting $8.50 back. That’s it. The neighbours get the $50, we don’t impose any costs on them, and we get just $8.50 back.
Very good value if anybody knows how to do sums.

The ALP and Labor have said we should get $12.50 back. The Greens don’t care.

5

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site