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ANU speed limits

By dtc - 5 September 2011 30

speed limits

Now that everyone is excited about road signs and Australian standards, I though I would submit a photo of my favourites – 3 signs, 3 speeds, all within 15m of each other.

Leading up to the 40km/h sign the speed limit is either 50 or 60km/h (I’m not sure), meaning the speed limit goes 60, 40, 20 and then 10 – all within a distance of 15m.

Given the location – Hutton Street, leading into the ANU (and into a car park), its hardly going to cause any problems.

But it always amuses me.

What’s Your opinion?


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30 Responses to
ANU speed limits
buzz819 2:24 pm 05 Sep 11

Innovation said :

Also, Buzz819 isn’t the maximum speed limit on all roundabouts 60k’s unless a lower speed limit is posted? If so, are you saying that the speed limit over the whole stretch should be 60k’s.

Umm no. The speed limit of a roundabout is the same limit as the road it is on. But you thinking that does explain why people are so confused about roundabouts.

p1 2:23 pm 05 Sep 11

DermottBanana said :

A few years ago, in NRMA’s Open Road magazine, I saw a letter written in which suggested the 70 & 90 limits be abolished (and most the other ‘minor’ limits severely rationalised), and all the white posts we see (the metre-high ones withe the reflectors) be colour-coded to indicate what the speed limit was.
Most sensible suggestion I ever heard on the topic.

Nice idea, but I suspect its adoption would result in this.

Henry82 2:09 pm 05 Sep 11

Doesn’t matter – Everyone will ignore all 3 signs and drive at their own speed (including Police/ANU Security)

MonarchRepublic 1:54 pm 05 Sep 11

creative_canberran said :

I don’t really get the point of the 10km/h sign (and for University students even the 20 seems overly cautious.)

The 10km/h sign is at the start of a ‘shared zone’, and with the number of students that meander across the roads without so much as a glance, it seems it may be necessary. As for the 20km/h zone, it is basically at the entrance to the carpark, and I believe 20km/h or below is pretty standard for carparks.

Alas, given the driving standard of some of the people commuting in and around the ANU, those speeds may not be slow enough!

creative_canberran 1:30 pm 05 Sep 11

Felix the Cat said :

I think the ANU may be classed as private property so the rules regarding distances and types of signs may not be applicable.

Commonwealth property rather than private property so the Australian standard should still be applicable. Aside from parking, the roads are subject to ACT law.

DermottBanana 1:23 pm 05 Sep 11

A few years ago, in NRMA’s Open Road magazine, I saw a letter written in which suggested the 70 & 90 limits be abolished (and most the other ‘minor’ limits severely rationalised), and all the white posts we see (the metre-high ones withe the reflectors) be colour-coded to indicate what the speed limit was.
Most sensible suggestion I ever heard on the topic.

Felix the Cat 1:20 pm 05 Sep 11

I think the ANU may be classed as private property so the rules regarding distances and types of signs may not be applicable.

creative_canberran 1:12 pm 05 Sep 11

I don’t really get the point of the 10km/h sign (and for University students even the 20 seems overly cautious.) But seriously, could a radar even detect a vehicle going that slow with any accuracy and who is really going to bother enforcing it?

Thoroughly Smashed said :

Innovation said :

isn’t the maximum speed limit on all roundabouts 60k’s unless a lower speed limit is posted?

Well even on a high performance sports tyre you’d be hard pressed to do anything more than 60 on all but the largest roundabouts (Yamba Dr in Woden for example). I don’t recall legally enforceable limit, but most roundabouts do have signposted suggested limits which are very conservative.

krasny 1:09 pm 05 Sep 11

In fairness, that forty isn’t a “this is a 40 road” sign, it’s advising the general campus speed limit. It actually reads “Maximum 40 unless a lower speed is indicated.”

sarahsarah 12:49 pm 05 Sep 11

I notice while driving along Hinder St in Gungahlin on the weekend there were road work signs proudly proclaiming the speed limit was 50. The whole area is classified as a “high pedestrian traffic area” and is zoned as 40 and there are (admittedly stupidly high) signs to that effect. You’d think they’d check the original speed limit before putting up signs that are actually higher then what they are supposed to be, haha!

Chop71 12:48 pm 05 Sep 11

or the sign that says “this is a sign”

Thoroughly Smashed 12:41 pm 05 Sep 11

Innovation said :

isn’t the maximum speed limit on all roundabouts 60k’s unless a lower speed limit is posted?

I haven’t heard that one before.

Innovation 12:25 pm 05 Sep 11

This photo does look ridiculous and seems nonsensical – why not start the street at 20k’s or even 10k’s? However, without having seen the standards, is there a possibility that the standards require graduated signage between certain speeds and/or over minimum distances (eg roads can’t go straight from 50 or 40 to 10k’s)?

Also, Buzz819 isn’t the maximum speed limit on all roundabouts 60k’s unless a lower speed limit is posted? If so, are you saying that the speed limit over the whole stretch should be 60k’s.

MonarchRepublic 12:16 pm 05 Sep 11

I have a feeling Kingsley Street (where the pictured signs are located) and Hutton Street are both sign posted at 40km/h these days.

That doesn’t take away from the amusing display though.

buzz819 10:48 am 05 Sep 11

How about between Chuculba Crescent and Dumas Street on William Slim Drive?

Just before the roundabout at Chuculba 80 zone to a 60 zone, just after the roundabout 60 zone to an 80 zone, just before the Baldwin Drive roundabout 80 – 60 then just after that roundabout back up to 80.

It’s fantastic, I think it is all in less then 2 – 3km as well on the one road

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