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Ask RiotACT: What’s up with the shopping trolley locks?

By Run_W - 7 February 2017 18

Ask RiotACT

Hi Rioters.

There seems to be a bit of a standoff going on with the shopping trolleys and the locks.  Round here, all of the trolleys have been fitted with locks, but they are helpfully tied back with zip ties. Both Coles and Woolworths are doing it.

I guess they have complied with the legislation and fitted the trolleys with locks.

I have asked a few people at the supermarkets, but no one has admitted to knowing anything. Does anyone know out there what is going on?

What’s Your opinion?


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18 Responses to
Ask RiotACT: What’s up with the shopping trolley locks?
dungfungus 10:51 am 10 Feb 17

JC said :

Zohra said :

dungfungus said :

No_Nose said :

dungfungus said :

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

That is why it is best to actually read the act:

Litter Act 2004
Section 24G
4. “trolley containment system” means a system approved by the director-general that is designed to reduce the number of a retailer’s shopping trolleys taken out of the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.
Example—trolley containment system: a system which requires the deposit of money by customers to use a shopping trolley which is refundable on the return of the trolley

The coin operated “containment system” is only an example. It doesn’t say it is mandatory.

And the system is to be designed to “reduce the number of trolleys taken out of the precinct……….”

And locks aren’t mentioned – it refers to a “deposit of money”.

Appalling bad drafting of the ACT (it would appear).

It’s actually good drafting. If someone comes up with a different idea or system, the legislation doesn’t have to be changed to allow it. The Director-General just has to approve it, which presumably means it has to be effective in some way in order to be approved.

There are already other systems.l including both mechanical and electrical locks that stop trolleys being taken out of a given area.

Years ago when I lived in Sydney the local shopping centre had these grids that would stop trolleys on the footpaths that linked the shopping centre to public footpaths. And same in U.K. thinking about it.

And saw just the other day in Sydney a shopping centre (Westfield Chatswood) that had an electronic system that locks trolley wheels.

And Dungers I am surprised that such a right wing supported such as yourself would want to government to be so specific to specify a system to use. Then again you are attacking a labor government so guess anything goes.

I was directing my criticism to “the government”, not your Labor government specifically but if you want to apologise for them I will accept it.
And just because I am a Geoffrey Blainey fan doesn’t mean I am “a right wing supporter”.

JC 12:33 am 10 Feb 17

Zohra said :

dungfungus said :

No_Nose said :

dungfungus said :

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

That is why it is best to actually read the act:

Litter Act 2004
Section 24G
4. “trolley containment system” means a system approved by the director-general that is designed to reduce the number of a retailer’s shopping trolleys taken out of the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.
Example—trolley containment system: a system which requires the deposit of money by customers to use a shopping trolley which is refundable on the return of the trolley

The coin operated “containment system” is only an example. It doesn’t say it is mandatory.

And the system is to be designed to “reduce the number of trolleys taken out of the precinct……….”

And locks aren’t mentioned – it refers to a “deposit of money”.

Appalling bad drafting of the ACT (it would appear).

It’s actually good drafting. If someone comes up with a different idea or system, the legislation doesn’t have to be changed to allow it. The Director-General just has to approve it, which presumably means it has to be effective in some way in order to be approved.

There are already other systems.l including both mechanical and electrical locks that stop trolleys being taken out of a given area.

Years ago when I lived in Sydney the local shopping centre had these grids that would stop trolleys on the footpaths that linked the shopping centre to public footpaths. And same in U.K. thinking about it.

And saw just the other day in Sydney a shopping centre (Westfield Chatswood) that had an electronic system that locks trolley wheels.

And Dungers I am surprised that such a right wing supported such as yourself would want to government to be so specific to specify a system to use. Then again you are attacking a labor government so guess anything goes.

dungfungus 6:04 pm 09 Feb 17

Zohra said :

dungfungus said :

No_Nose said :

dungfungus said :

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

That is why it is best to actually read the act:

Litter Act 2004
Section 24G
4. “trolley containment system” means a system approved by the director-general that is designed to reduce the number of a retailer’s shopping trolleys taken out of the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.
Example—trolley containment system: a system which requires the deposit of money by customers to use a shopping trolley which is refundable on the return of the trolley

The coin operated “containment system” is only an example. It doesn’t say it is mandatory.

And the system is to be designed to “reduce the number of trolleys taken out of the precinct……….”

And locks aren’t mentioned – it refers to a “deposit of money”.

Appalling bad drafting of the ACT (it would appear).

It’s actually good drafting. If someone comes up with a different idea or system, the legislation doesn’t have to be changed to allow it. The Director-General just has to approve it, which presumably means it has to be effective in some way in order to be approved.

I would call that a “gonzo government” solution”.

Zohra 5:25 pm 09 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

No_Nose said :

dungfungus said :

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

That is why it is best to actually read the act:

Litter Act 2004
Section 24G
4. “trolley containment system” means a system approved by the director-general that is designed to reduce the number of a retailer’s shopping trolleys taken out of the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.
Example—trolley containment system: a system which requires the deposit of money by customers to use a shopping trolley which is refundable on the return of the trolley

The coin operated “containment system” is only an example. It doesn’t say it is mandatory.

And the system is to be designed to “reduce the number of trolleys taken out of the precinct……….”

And locks aren’t mentioned – it refers to a “deposit of money”.

Appalling bad drafting of the ACT (it would appear).

It’s actually good drafting. If someone comes up with a different idea or system, the legislation doesn’t have to be changed to allow it. The Director-General just has to approve it, which presumably means it has to be effective in some way in order to be approved.

Chris Mordd Richards 1:20 pm 09 Feb 17

Had to track down where I had the number saved, but I just left a voicemail for Craig Hermiston, Woolworths Group Manager ACT who I dealt with last year for the other Woolies article, asking if he can give me a comment on why the trolleys are like this at the moment. I’ll post his reply if/when he calls me back.

dungfungus 12:45 pm 09 Feb 17

Leon Arundell said :

The explanation is a loophole written into Section 24G of the Litter Act 2004.
Section 24G says that “A retailer commits an offence if the retailer fails to keep a shopping trolley identified as belonging to the retailer under section 24F (1) within the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.” It makes an exception if “the retailer operates and maintains a trolley containment system at the retailer’s premises,” but without requiring the system to actually be effective.

That’s the way I saw it too……………..

Leon Arundell 10:35 am 09 Feb 17

The explanation is a loophole written into Section 24G of the Litter Act 2004.
Section 24G says that “A retailer commits an offence if the retailer fails to keep a shopping trolley identified as belonging to the retailer under section 24F (1) within the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.” It makes an exception if “the retailer operates and maintains a trolley containment system at the retailer’s premises,” but without requiring the system to actually be effective.

pink little birdie 10:58 am 08 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

No_Nose said :

dungfungus said :

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

That is why it is best to actually read the act:

Litter Act 2004
Section 24G
4. “trolley containment system” means a system approved by the director-general that is designed to reduce the number of a retailer’s shopping trolleys taken out of the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.
Example—trolley containment system: a system which requires the deposit of money by customers to use a shopping trolley which is refundable on the return of the trolley

The coin operated “containment system” is only an example. It doesn’t say it is mandatory.

And the system is to be designed to “reduce the number of trolleys taken out of the precinct……….”

And locks aren’t mentioned – it refers to a “deposit of money”.

Appalling bad drafting of the ACT (it would appear).

If you have a better cheaper way to “reduce the number of trolleys taken out of the precinct……….”
I’m sure the supermarkets would love to hear it.
The deposit schemes do actually work for a moderate capital cost and then a low ongoing cost.

dungfungus 8:08 am 08 Feb 17

No_Nose said :

dungfungus said :

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

That is why it is best to actually read the act:

Litter Act 2004
Section 24G
4. “trolley containment system” means a system approved by the director-general that is designed to reduce the number of a retailer’s shopping trolleys taken out of the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.
Example—trolley containment system: a system which requires the deposit of money by customers to use a shopping trolley which is refundable on the return of the trolley

The coin operated “containment system” is only an example. It doesn’t say it is mandatory.

And the system is to be designed to “reduce the number of trolleys taken out of the precinct……….”

And locks aren’t mentioned – it refers to a “deposit of money”.

Appalling bad drafting of the ACT (it would appear).

Chris Mordd Richards 11:10 pm 07 Feb 17

I’ll see if the Woolies ACT region manager who’s number I still have from my plastic bags pricing (or lack of) article from last year, is willing to comment on this question. Let you know.

mountainman 8:35 pm 07 Feb 17

Dan Murphys in Woden installed locks in the trolleys just prior to Christmas. I didn’t have any change / cash on me so I went to the cashier pretty frustrated. They just gave me a Dan Murphys key ring which contained a plastic circle the size of a coin and I used this to get my trolley. Whilst I was there I saw a couple of other people do the same thing!

No_Nose 7:06 pm 07 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

That is why it is best to actually read the act:

Litter Act 2004
Section 24G
4. “trolley containment system” means a system approved by the director-general that is designed to reduce the number of a retailer’s shopping trolleys taken out of the retailer’s shopping centre precinct.
Example—trolley containment system: a system which requires the deposit of money by customers to use a shopping trolley which is refundable on the return of the trolley

cross 12:11 pm 07 Feb 17

5 bucks on ebay gets you a universal trolley unlocker

Grail 8:55 am 07 Feb 17

The supermarkets like Woolworths usually have contracts with trolley-wranglers. I suspect the zip ties on the trolley locks are going to stay in place until the current contracts are over, and new contracts can be negotiated based on the expectation that customers will be returning trolleys to trolley bays in order to claim the deposits back.

dungfungus 8:33 am 07 Feb 17

I can’t find anything about fitting locks in the apparent latest legislation (under litter regulations) here: http://www.tccs.act.gov.au/territory-services/city_rangers/changes_to_shopping_trolley_legislation_litter_act_2004

There is reference to “trolley containment systems” but to me this would mean the existing steel rail corrals in the parking areas that hold the trolleys.

And just because there is a $2 security deposit when the locks are finally activated won’t mean that the trolleys won’t end up in the familiar places likes lakes, median strips etc.

After all, locks are only respected by honest people.

Your suggestion about the supermarkets being told to fit the trolleys with locks but not necessarily use them seems likely.

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