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Assault of a child in the Belconnen Library

By johnboy 5 September 2013 75

ACT Policing is investigating an incident at the Belconnen library where a man is alleged to have assaulted a young child earlier today (September 5).

Police were called to the library about 1.30pm following a report that an unknown man was found in a corner of the library with a child.

The man left the location shortly afterward.

The offender is described as having dark-coloured skin, approximately 5’ 7” (170cm) tall, aged in his mid-30s to early 40s, and with a short beard. He was wearing a very loose-fitting tracksuit.

Police are appealing for anyone who was in the library at the time or can assist with the investigation to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or via www.act.crimestoppers.com.au. Information can be provided anonymously.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]


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Assault of a child in the Belconnen Library
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IrishPete 5:58 pm 04 Feb 14

lostinbias said :

I generally try to avoid emotive pitchfork reactions to these things, but considering this guy’s history he really shouldn’t be released back into the community.

I watched a Louis Theroux documentary about a detention facility for pedophiles in California. After they had completed their prison sentences they would be sent to this facility, where they would be held. They had the option to participate in rehabilitation, but most refused or were not considered safe to be in the community yet. A tiny percentage got out of there.

The way they tested their rehabilitation efforts involved sexual stimuli (not actual child abuse material or anything) and looked to me like it would work, but I’m not a doctor.

I surprisingly came to think this facility was actually a good idea, as they were being kept away from the community, however considering they had finished their sentences, they were being held in relatively comfortable surroundings, not like prison. I never thought I’d support indefinite detention in this manner, but the program seemed well and humanely implemented, and the recidivism statistics don’t fill me with confidence about letting them out into the community.

The documentary dated from 2008 or 2009, but was repeated a few weeks ago on ABC2 (search iView for Louis Theroux and it may still be viewable).

This is similar to the legislation in some Australian States, but because of the much smaller numbers of such people here there are no specialised institutions, and the offenders are simply held in prison.

The testing equipment you referred to is a PPG (look it up) and like lie detector tests (which they also mentioned using) they are not infallible.

Interestingly, the facility in the documentary is designated as a mental hospital, which has lots of implications that might not go down well in Australia. The documentary won a lot of awards, but Wikipedia says it has never been shown in the USA – it can’t be shown there because of health privacy laws, because it is a hospital!

It did look quite comfortable, but probably one reason is that it wasn’t yet full – once full, it will be busier, noisier, and eventually maybe it will be over-full and have all sorts of other problems.

One guy they interviewed extensively had been approved for release a year earlier, but could not find accommodation. This was probably because of the sexual offender notification laws in California which don’t exist here.

IP

Brianna said :

I would like to see the sentencing judge made accountable for the sentencing.

Which aspects of the sentencing remarks did you disagree with? I assume you read the report…

Walker 3:33 pm 04 Feb 14

lostinbias said :

I generally try to avoid emotive pitchfork reactions to these things, but considering this guy’s history he really shouldn’t be released back into the community.

I watched a Louis Theroux documentary about a detention facility for pedophiles in California. After they had completed their prison sentences they would be sent to this facility, where they would be held. They had the option to participate in rehabilitation, but most refused or were not considered safe to be in the community yet. A tiny percentage got out of there.

The way they tested their rehabilitation efforts involved sexual stimuli (not actual child abuse material or anything) and looked to me like it would work, but I’m not a doctor.

I surprisingly came to think this facility was actually a good idea, as they were being kept away from the community, however considering they had finished their sentences, they were being held in relatively comfortable surroundings, not like prison. I never thought I’d support indefinite detention in this manner, but the program seemed well and humanely implemented, and the recidivism statistics don’t fill me with confidence about letting them out into the community.

Seems worth considering.
It also means victims who recognise them won’t have to walk past them in the street and the sickening feelings that would go with that, or in some cases the upheaval of leaving town for such things. The criminals are the ones that should be outcast.

bundah 9:33 am 04 Feb 14

NoImRight said :

Brianna said :

I would like to see the sentencing judge made accountable for the sentencing. Why was it such a short period? What happens when he gets out again and does the same thing?
If he is paroled, then reoffends, then whoever is on the parole board should be made accountable.

In what way?

Or Charles Bronson style maybe?

That would be incredibly effective. I wonder what the Court of Appeals will think of the Chief Justice’s sentence? Hmm Charles Bronson style is far more appealing…

NoImRight 8:46 am 04 Feb 14

Brianna said :

I would like to see the sentencing judge made accountable for the sentencing. Why was it such a short period? What happens when he gets out again and does the same thing?
If he is paroled, then reoffends, then whoever is on the parole board should be made accountable.

In what way?

Or Charles Bronson style maybe?

Brianna 8:51 pm 03 Feb 14

I would like to see the sentencing judge made accountable for the sentencing. Why was it such a short period? What happens when he gets out again and does the same thing?
If he is paroled, then reoffends, then whoever is on the parole board should be made accountable.

lostinbias 6:36 pm 03 Feb 14

I generally try to avoid emotive pitchfork reactions to these things, but considering this guy’s history he really shouldn’t be released back into the community.

I watched a Louis Theroux documentary about a detention facility for pedophiles in California. After they had completed their prison sentences they would be sent to this facility, where they would be held. They had the option to participate in rehabilitation, but most refused or were not considered safe to be in the community yet. A tiny percentage got out of there.

The way they tested their rehabilitation efforts involved sexual stimuli (not actual child abuse material or anything) and looked to me like it would work, but I’m not a doctor.

I surprisingly came to think this facility was actually a good idea, as they were being kept away from the community, however considering they had finished their sentences, they were being held in relatively comfortable surroundings, not like prison. I never thought I’d support indefinite detention in this manner, but the program seemed well and humanely implemented, and the recidivism statistics don’t fill me with confidence about letting them out into the community.

IrishPete 3:20 pm 03 Feb 14

bundah said :

The stats I looked at came from these two sources:

http://www.bravehearts.org.au/files/Facts%20and%20Stats_updated141212.pdf?

http://www.aifs.gov.au/cfca/pubs/factsheets/a142086/

There was a hell of a lot of info there so I just grabbed a few trying to highlight that it’s often according to the stats ostensibly ordinary people that commit these horrific crimes particularly given apparently one in hundred get away with it.

I couldn’t find a mention of education level, and I see now that with the comments on intelligence what they (and you) were trying to imply is that it’s not primarily people with an intellectual disability who offend.

But the whole issue of statistics on offenders is fraught, because they usually only describe those who have been caught.

Also need to make a distinction between the number of offenders and the number of victims – an educated offender (say a teacher or priest) may have lots of victims, whereas an uneducated offender may have fewer. I don’t know that, it’s informed speculation.

IP

NoImRight 1:11 pm 03 Feb 14

CraigT said :

bundah said :

The question is whether we as a society are prepared to spend the money needed to seriously tackle the problem of child abuse or is it just in the too hard basket and therefore easier to sweep it under the carpet?

It all depends on whether the lefties are ever capable of seeing the sense in saying that an adult who is on welfare has no business to be breeding.

If receiving welfare was conditional on providing a medical certificate to the effect that no breeding is possible, a hell of a lot of child abuse (not to mention crime) would be eliminated.

Tony Abbott might be an idiot, but he’s already proven he can deal with the leftie-lobbies who sponge of us – by giving them zero information to fuel their illegal immigrant/”poor desperate refugee” hysteria – so here’s hoping that his welfare reform will,
a. cut off the 75% of disability pensioners who are nothing but scroungers.
and
b. make people work for their welfare and stop them from breeding

Does someone pay you a dollar everytime you write “leftie”? I hope so.

Please stop speaking as if you a spokesman for the “right”. You arent helping. Otherwise you are funny. I do enjoy your sweeping assumptions based on stats plucked from your probably quite large.. well you know where. If not ask your handler.

100 bucks says your response, if you are game ;-), will be a broadside about “lefties” that doesnt actually stick to topic and will simply just regurgitate what you think lefties think so you can then attack that instead. Or…google strawman argument.

bundah 10:44 am 03 Feb 14

That should be 99 out of 100 get away with it!

bundah 10:42 am 03 Feb 14

IrishPete said :

bundah said :

Child sexual abuse is a huge problem worldwide right across all socioeconomic groups. Statistics indicate that a substantial majority of offenders had not completed secondary education which is unsurprising. Further to this apparently 80% of offenders are of average intelligence.

There are endless statistics re child sexual abuse and the more research one does the more disillusioned one becomes particularly given that only one in a hundred offenders are caught and prosecuted. The picture is incredibly gloomy.

Your first and second sentences partly contradict each other. I agree with the first sentence, but not the second – can you provide a source for those statistics? The third sentence is meaningless, almost as meaningless as saying with horror “50% of people are below average intelligence”.

Average intelligence is an IQ of 100 – 80% of offenders do not have an IQ of 100; probably not even 80% have an IQ between 85 and 115. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IQ_distribution.svg for an idea of the population distribution of IQ (which isn’t a very robust construct anyway, and is much harder than most people realise to measure accurately).

Indeed the low level of reporting and prosecution is very disturbing.

IP

The stats I looked at came from these two sources:

http://www.bravehearts.org.au/files/Facts%20and%20Stats_updated141212.pdf?

http://www.aifs.gov.au/cfca/pubs/factsheets/a142086/

There was a hell of a lot of info there so I just grabbed a few trying to highlight that it’s often according to the stats ostensibly ordinary people that commit these horrific crimes particularly given apparently one in hundred get away with it.

IrishPete 9:54 am 03 Feb 14

bundah said :

Child sexual abuse is a huge problem worldwide right across all socioeconomic groups. Statistics indicate that a substantial majority of offenders had not completed secondary education which is unsurprising. Further to this apparently 80% of offenders are of average intelligence.

There are endless statistics re child sexual abuse and the more research one does the more disillusioned one becomes particularly given that only one in a hundred offenders are caught and prosecuted. The picture is incredibly gloomy.

Your first and second sentences partly contradict each other. I agree with the first sentence, but not the second – can you provide a source for those statistics? The third sentence is meaningless, almost as meaningless as saying with horror “50% of people are below average intelligence”.

Average intelligence is an IQ of 100 – 80% of offenders do not have an IQ of 100; probably not even 80% have an IQ between 85 and 115. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IQ_distribution.svg for an idea of the population distribution of IQ (which isn’t a very robust construct anyway, and is much harder than most people realise to measure accurately).

Indeed the low level of reporting and prosecution is very disturbing.

IP

milkman 9:56 pm 02 Feb 14

IrishPete said :

(whoever they are, because most Australians seem to be on welfare these days, be it baby bonuses, child care assistance, health insurance rebates).

IP

The only reason many Australians get private health insurance rebates is because they are forced into having private health insurance. For our family, it would be far more expensive to pay the medicare levy surcharge than pay for private health cover.

bundah 9:03 pm 02 Feb 14

CraigT said :

bundah said :

The question is whether we as a society are prepared to spend the money needed to seriously tackle the problem of child abuse or is it just in the too hard basket and therefore easier to sweep it under the carpet?

It all depends on whether the lefties are ever capable of seeing the sense in saying that an adult who is on welfare has no business to be breeding.

If receiving welfare was conditional on providing a medical certificate to the effect that no breeding is possible, a hell of a lot of child abuse (not to mention crime) would be eliminated.

Tony Abbott might be an idiot, but he’s already proven he can deal with the leftie-lobbies who sponge of us – by giving them zero information to fuel their illegal immigrant/”poor desperate refugee” hysteria – so here’s hoping that his welfare reform will,
a. cut off the 75% of disability pensioners who are nothing but scroungers.
and
b. make people work for their welfare and stop them from breeding

Child sexual abuse is a huge problem worldwide right across all socioeconomic groups. Statistics indicate that a substantial majority of offenders had not completed secondary education which is unsurprising. Further to this apparently 80% of offenders are of average intelligence.

There are endless statistics re child sexual abuse and the more research one does the more disillusioned one becomes particularly given that only one in a hundred offenders are caught and prosecuted. The picture is incredibly gloomy.

IrishPete 8:35 pm 02 Feb 14

What kind of a person turns a discussion about the awful molestation of a 3yo child, into an opportunity to look for reds under the bed, and to laud the government’s immigration policy? Oh, yeah, a troll. Dammit, I took the bait. They’re probably really a fictional persona, and in fact actually a mild-manner accountant living in Yorkshire, England, who can’t even pronounce Canberra, never mind knows where it is.

By the way, most child abuse occurs within the home, or by more distant relatives or family friends, and is not committed by strangers on “welfare” (whoever they are, because most Australians seem to be on welfare these days, be it baby bonuses, child care assistance, health insurance rebates).

IP

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