BBQ’ed Lawnmower – how to buy a sheep in Canberra

Aurelius 12 September 2008 117

It’s Spring! So like many locals, I will soon be cursed with the weekly chore of mowing the lawn. But I don’t like doing that, so I am seeking another solution.

I am seeking a lamb to eat my lawn, and then when the summer months are behind us, I want to have a big BBQ party at Easter and eat the aforementioned lamb. But buying a lamb has proven more of a challenge than first imagined. Does anyone know someone who wants to sell one in the next couple of weeks? The standard way of getting a lamb (go to the saleyards and buy it) is a little impractical if sales are only held on weekdays, and work tends to get in the way at such times.

Can the hivemind help out here? I’ve been asking around my own circle, but all the leads have come to nothing thus far.

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117 Responses to BBQ’ed Lawnmower – how to buy a sheep in Canberra
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Loquaciousness Loquaciousness 7:46 pm 14 Sep 08

Granny said :

Did you hear the one about the hermit who went out for a wood fired alpaca pizza?

Yeah, I heard he had a bit of a Downer, and got completely bagged.

L

Granny Granny 6:37 pm 14 Sep 08

Did you hear the one about the hermit who went out for a wood fired alpaca pizza?

Thumper Thumper 6:34 pm 14 Sep 08

That would be, one hermit went out for a wood fired alpaca pizza

Loquaciousness Loquaciousness 5:30 pm 14 Sep 08

Didn’t you hear? Herman’s Hermits (sans Herman, I’m told) went out for woodfired alpaca pizza only last week …

L

Aurelius Aurelius 5:18 pm 14 Sep 08

For a thread that’s gone for 75 posts (76 now) I’m surprised there hasn’t been more vitriol, discussion of woodfired pizza, or mention of Hermans Hermits here.

Loquaciousness Loquaciousness 4:46 pm 14 Sep 08

Granny said :

(It’s probably the Bolivian quinoa that nullifies the donkey aftertaste).

Gold!

Can I just say … tagline?!

L

Granny Granny 4:36 pm 14 Sep 08

Lay some of that Char-grilled Alpaca Sirloin with Bolivian Quinoa and Chimichurri Sauce on me, baby! (It’s probably the Bolivian quinoa that nullifies the donkey aftertaste).

Loquaciousness Loquaciousness 4:24 pm 14 Sep 08

peter@home said :

found this great link for alpaca recipes….

http://www.laviande.com.au/content/recipes/index.shtml

/me licks her lips.

Thanks Peter!

L

peter@home peter@home 4:15 pm 14 Sep 08

Loquaciousness said :

Granny said :

They probably taste a bit like a cross between a goat and a camel.

Possibly with a hint of Llama, I would imagine, and an aftertaste similar to that of donkey.

*rolls eyes*

L

found this great link for alpaca recipes….

http://www.laviande.com.au/content/recipes/index.shtml

Loquaciousness Loquaciousness 4:09 pm 14 Sep 08

Granny said :

They probably taste a bit like a cross between a goat and a camel.

Possibly with a hint of Llama, I would imagine, and an aftertaste similar to that of donkey.

*rolls eyes*

L

peter@home peter@home 3:57 pm 14 Sep 08

ant said :

Steaks in outback pubs taste great because they hang their meat for the proper time. And if you keep the flies off (it’s usually done in a cool room of some sort, but not cold) there’s no maggots. The meat tenderises, and develops good flavour.

I age my meat in the fridge using kitchen towels for a week, usually, and the difference it makes is quite amazing.

get a meat safe – hang it up in the garage, and soak the hessian in water prior to hanging the meat up. keeps it cool, and allows the meat to age.

I had a very old safe that it wood and flyscreen with hessian covering it. it was called an evaporative safe, and ensured that it kept the meat cool via evaporation.
it allowed it to age, and at night, you could remove the hessian and use the natural coolness.

Granny Granny 3:34 pm 14 Sep 08

They probably taste a bit like a cross between a goat and a camel.

Loquaciousness Loquaciousness 3:08 pm 14 Sep 08

Granny said :

Probably the only good alpaca is a barbecued alpaca, I should think. Give it a go, I say!

Indeed. I wonder if they taste any good though?

L

Granny Granny 3:01 pm 14 Sep 08

Probably the only good alpaca is a barbecued alpaca, I should think. Give it a go, I say!

Loquaciousness Loquaciousness 2:36 pm 14 Sep 08

Aurelius said :

I am yet to track down a suitable lamb, though yesterday a friend offered me two alpacas.

Can you barbecue alpacas?

L

ant ant 8:35 am 14 Sep 08

Imarty, abattoirs nowadays largely use hot water to process the carcasses faster, which impacts on the meat flavour, and increases water content, which also casues the meat to go off easier. the meat packed in trays is still bleeding, and it is the sitting in blood that causes teh “off” taste some meat has nowadays.

Aurelius Aurelius 7:43 am 14 Sep 08

I am yet to track down a suitable lamb, though yesterday a friend offered me two alpacas. The quest continues though, so advice for obtaining lamb is still desired.
Oh, and the advice re looking after said lamb, and post-slaughter BBQ preparation is also well received.

imarty imarty 10:57 pm 13 Sep 08

Aurelius, good luck with finding the sheep, not sure I can help there but there seems to be some good suggestions!
ant, you’re right about the aging, beef should be aged minimum 5 days, up to 3 weeks if you’re dry aging (not in a vacuum bag), lamb and pork about 3. The naturally ocurring enzymes in the meat breakdown the connective tissue within the muscle thereby increasing the tenderness and contributing (slightly) to the flavour. Feed and fat (marbling) is the major influence on flavour, personally, I prefer grass fed beef which is not that easy to find nowadays.
Where you got the hot water in abattoirs and continuing to bleed idea from and it’s impact on flavour and tenderness has got me buggered. Doesn’t happen in terms of trying to improve quality.
Also much of the meat you eat has been dead for about a week anyway, minimum.

ant ant 8:03 pm 13 Sep 08

Steaks in outback pubs taste great because they hang their meat for the proper time. And if you keep the flies off (it’s usually done in a cool room of some sort, but not cold) there’s no maggots. The meat tenderises, and develops good flavour.

I age my meat in the fridge using kitchen towels for a week, usually, and the difference it makes is quite amazing.

Matto Matto 1:12 pm 13 Sep 08

Still no go, bloody hopeless. I’m gonna quit while I’m behind.

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