The best double glazing companies in Canberra

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Monaro Windows

Monaro Windows, one of Canberra’s highest rated Double Glazing Companies. Photo: Thomas Lucraft.

Canberra is known for freezing cold winters and stifling hot summers, making heating and cooling your home a challenge. Double glazing is one way to keep you comfortable, be energy efficient and save money on energy bills.

Double glazing has other advantages too, including reducing condensation and noise pollution. It’s also more secure. And these days, double glazing is more affordable than ever.

If you’re looking to build new or upgrade your existing property, you’ll want to choose a double-glazing company that is professional, efficient and economical.

In this article, we’ll outline the qualities to consider when choosing a double-glazing installer, and share where to find the best in Canberra.

What makes a great double glazing company?

Choosing the right double glazing company can take the worry out of making the wrong choice on product and installation method.

It can be helpful to keep the following in mind when choosing a double glazing company.

  • Quality products. If you want your double glazing investment to make a real difference, you’ll want to buy top-quality products. With so many types of products on the market, it’s best to research options and discuss offerings with each double glazing company.
  • Proven track record. You’ll want to check how long the double glazing company has been in business and what their track record is. Head to their website and check out their reputation online.
  • Expert staff. The best glaziers are experts in their field. They know the ins and outs of double glazing, so you’ll want to take advantage of their knowledge to tailor a temperature control solution that works for you.
  • Competitively priced. No one likes to over-pay. When selecting a double-glazing company, check their pricing against others in the market.
  • Guarantee. Make sure your double-glazed windows, and installation service, are guaranteed. This will protect your investment. Check the company’s website for details of their guarantee promise and/or talk to installers.

The best double glazing companies in Canberra

Riotact’s editorial team has combed through 20 years of on-site comments to compile a list of the most recommended businesses according to you.

To be listed in our Best of Canberra series, each business needs to have consistently received positive feedback on Riotact and Facebook as well as maintaining a minimum average of 4/5 stars on Google.

Monaro Windows

Monaro Windows

Monaro Windows is all about high-performance, energy efficient windows and doors for residential and commercial properties. A local, family owned business, Monaro Windows has been manufacturing premium quality aluminium windows and doors in Canberra since 1988. Their products not only enhance energy efficiency, they add privacy, reduce noise, add protection and visual appeal.

High-performance, architecturally designed aluminium doors and window from the Vantage, Elevate and ThermalHEART ranges provide innovative performance and outstanding results. Monaro Windows also sells high performing uPVC windo designs from Kommerling that are beautiful, durable and easy to maintain.

Monaro Windows offers doors for all styles and tastes, each providing a quality ‘first impression’, including dramatic aesthetic effects. The company’s range of windows includes bi-fold, sliding, louvre, sashless, double hung, awing and casement. They can withstand harsh weather and remain stain-free even during violent storms.

Windows and doors come in a wide range of standard styles and colours. Monaro Windows can also customise products.

Monaro Windows has two showroom locations—Queanbeyan and Mitchell.

As Jodie Arrow wrote on Google, “We had our old windows updated with some slick looking double glazed widows, great service at a good price …”

7/42 Stephens Road
Queanbeyan NSW 2620
TwinGlaze

TwinGlaze

Glazing movers and shakers, TwinGlaze, revolutionised the local market with their solutions centric product made right here in Canberra.

After embarking on an extensive research and development program in 2015, TwinGlaze developed an environmentally sensitive and cost-effective system allowing any single glazed window to be transformed into its fully insulated double glazed counterpart.

Known as TwinGlaze®, this system allows for original frames to be retained by replacing only the glass. By engineering a combination of materials, the TwinGlaze® system mitigates the expense of full frame window replacement, while reaping the insulating and energy efficiency benefits that double glazing offers.

The TwinGlaze® system delivers a high-performance double-glazing profile through a combination of laminated security glass, a thermal argon gap, and Low E toughened glass to deliver optimum thermal performance. Easily installed into any existing timber or aluminium frame, this system maintains the look and feel of your home.

For a cost-effective double-glazing solution that lifts thermal performance, boosts energy efficiency, and improves glass safety look to Twin Glaze Canberra.

TwinGlaze ACT Team

Keir Winesmith shared this great feedback on Google, “Excellent service from trustworthy staff and a good product.”

33 Spongolite Street
Beard ACT 2620

Architech Windows

Architech Windows is a leader in double-glazed, high-performance windows, installed by professional and experienced tradespeople. The company has specialised in new builds and retrofitting with energy efficient windows since 2010. Architech Windows also custom designs windows.

Dean Gordon wrote on RiotACT, “We used Architech and they were brilliant. From sales to install and then after installation service, their communication and customer service was fantastic. We got the tilt and turn double glazed throughout the whole house, including tinting and couldn't be happier.”

Magnetite Double Glazing

Magnetite Double Glazing retrofit products are built for the Australian environment. Residential services include assessing, designing and delivering tailored double-glazing services to upgrade the performance of existing window and doors, using a unique, award-winning system.

Iain Fyfe wrote on Google, “Magnetite is helpful and knowledgeable about their product and window insulation …  Our house has a lot of windows, recycled heritage as well as contemporary, and a great solution was installed in all cases at reasonable cost.”

Supaglass Industries

Established in 2011, Supaglass Industries offers tailor-made glass products and personalised service. Specialising in double glazing manufacture, waterjet cutting and glass toughening services, Supaglass keeps a large range of glass and equipment on hand ready to be fit to your specific needs. This means Supaglass can significantly reduce wait times on their services, with no compromise to quality or construction requirements.

On Google, Terry Rushton writes, “We are extremely happy with the double glazed windows supplied and installed. Would highly recommend Supaglass and would certainly use them again.”

If you’re looking for more information on double glazing, you might like our article on the best glaziers in Canberra. If you’re upgrading your home, you might like our articles on the best builders and renovators and the best painters Canberra has to offer.

Your experience with double glazing companies in Canberra

Thanks to our commentators who have provided insightful feedback. If you believe we have got it wrong, please let us know.

Have you had experience with any of the double glazing companies listed above? If so, share your feedback in the comments below.

Frequently Asked Questions

What should I look for in double-glazed windows?

As a minimum, you should look for the energy ratings of the windows, product guarantees, the quality of the double glazing itself and the quality of the window frames.

How much do double glazed windows cost?

This depends on factors such as the type and quality of window you buy, the number of windows you need and complexities with installing. You should ask for a detailed quote from more than one supplier to be comfortable you’re getting the best buy for your budget.

What are the benefits of installing double glazed windows?

The many benefits of installing double glazing windows include providing year-round comfort, protecting the environment, saving on your energy bills, reducing noise, increasing security and adding value to your property.

Is double glazing worth the money?

Double glazing can reduce energy bills by a significant amount. You’ll need to balance savings against many factors, like the cost of installing or retrofitting double glazed windows, how long you intend to stay in your home and whether you have the money to invest in the windows. It’s best to ask a few double glazing companies to work out what they think the value of your investment will be.

Is double glazing just for winter?

No. Double glazing makes your home comfortable in all seasons, especially by keeping warm air inside in winter and cool air inside in summer.

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Monaro Windows have a good product but the service is dreadful with endless delays and a lack of communication when it comes to the installation. Unless you are prepared for a long wait for the installation, I would not recommend.

I know this is an old thread and there’s already a lot of great info on here, but if you can’t be bothered to DIY and want to have it done professionally, check out https://malplas.com.au/

We’ve been using them for years and they’ve always done an ace job.

Maybe they’re great, but I’ve looked at their website in the past, and looking at it again, it’s just as bad. I would like to see some examples of their work before I bother picking up the phone.

madmum said :

InKambah said :

I’m interested in double glazing my windows in 2015. Any tips on a good vendor/contractor?

Look up ACTDoubleGlazed

Hi there you can try Malplas Canberra. Great blokes

David Pollard said :

Ive installed some honeycomb blinds, which due to deep window frames can sit under existing blinds. Not sure how they go relative to double glazing or some form of stick on covering; so far I can certainly notice less cold drafts coming through the gaps between the blinds and the walls but don’t know if that translates into cheaper bills.

Honeycomb blinds are great – except that mine are the earliest version and have open edges and if a spider crawls along one of the slats, it will get stuck. nb You must have pelmets AND you should have insulated heavy curtains along with your honeycomb blinds, and then you’ll lose very little heat.

Someone posted earlier about cavity insulation – but in a solid brick house, wouldn’t the air between the bricks be an effective insulation element? I though cavity insulation was more for brick veneer walls?

Both myself and my parents have used Just Rite. Just Rite has been around for long time I think. We got our ceiling cavity wall and double glazing done through them. We found them quite professional. If you like then can check on the link I went through
http://www.justrite.com.au/products-and-services/retrofit-double-glazing/get-double-glazed-windows-for-your-home-in-canberra/
http://www.justrite.com.au/products-and-services/retrofit-wall-insulation-cavity-wall/

Good Luck 🙂

Effective and durable insulation is worth splurging on to avoid shivering through these cold Canberra winter nights in a drafty house risking the kids (or oldies) coming down with pneumonia. For an existing one room extension with three windows I’m considering double glazed windows in a wooden frame and after excluding companies that have negative reviews about their customer service on this and other forums have a shortlist of:
http://www.cswindows.com.au/products.htm
http://www.trendwindows.com.au/
http://www.justrite.com.au/
There is also something called a composite double glazed window, made up of aluminium on the outside for low maintenance, and timber inside to provide better looks and all important heat retention. Provided by Stegbar:
https://www.stegbar.com.au/Products/Windows/Siteline/Siteline-Awning-Windows
This seems to be the ideal solution, avoiding the cheap and nasty plastic film across the window solution, magnetic perspex sheets or uPVC (unplasticised Poly Vinyl Chloride).

We have done a much less expensive version of double glazing which may be of interest to someone else.

We got the man who did the shower screens to cut glass (ordinary glass works, but los e glass would be better) to fit the window frame & frame it with aluminium.
Then make sure you the get some air sealer (buy it in a roll from your hardware store) and draft seal the edges. You then just attach it with a little lever thingy (also from the hardware shop) & extra panes can be removed for cleaning or whatever.

Hugely less expensive option. Provides good insulation. Hope it helps someone.

Ive installed some honeycomb blinds, which due to deep window frames can sit under existing blinds. Not sure how they go relative to double glazing or some form of stick on covering; so far I can certainly notice less cold drafts coming through the gaps between the blinds and the walls but don’t know if that translates into cheaper bills.

AlexanderWatson7:37 am 08 Jul 16

I’ll declare straight up that I own an insulation retrofitting business but just wanted to reinforce the comments made about windows so far. In some case study work we did with the ACT government and other energy efficiency companies we saw brilliant results from retrofit products like clear comfort. They can be a little tricky to fit but if there’s nothing aesthetically wrong with your windows they’re a great (and cheap) option. If you do go down the double glazed road though, getting that thermal break on the frames is vitally important.

As for cavity wall insulation, like all products there’s pros and cons. Pros – it works really really well when done properly and doesn’t need your house to be torn apart in order to install it. Cons – is a pain though not impossible running cables in the future, you can’t see the installers work as its hidden behind the wall (we use a thermal camera to check) and in most cases you aren’t allowed to have as much power running through the power cables when completely surrounded by insulation so there’s often electrical work involved. When it’s -5 outside and you don’t realize until you walk outside its pretty easy to live with the cons 🙂

Can you recommend someone in Canberra to install the clear comfort or similar product to my unit in McKellar.
sue.s@windowslive.com

pink little birdie said :

… some aluminum double glazed windows are no better then single glazed wooden windows, as without thermal breaks the cold goes straight through the frame.

Bingo. This is the most common mistake people make with double-glazing. It adds a bit to the cost, but without thermal breaks you are just throwing away your hard earned money.

Do not look for or click on Winter Windows as that website was hijacked. It is now called Clear Comfort which is in my earlier post.

Depending what your present windows are made of be careful replacing them. I can remember being told in a lecture I went to on making your house energy efficient that some aluminum double glazed windows are no better then single glazed wooden windows, as without thermal breaks the cold goes straight through the frame.
In my previous house I used ‘winter windows’; a plastic film over the wooden frame, leaving a gap between it and the glass. I had some aluminum windows too, but I couldn’t use this film on them, as the gap wasn’t enough. I had no problem with moisture.
Honey comb blinds are good too.

I’ve tried a few things in my house. Our extension has new double glazed windows with a thermal break (wood inside, colorbond outside) which we love but the old part of the house has single glazed windows.

I’ve tried the following:
Thick curtains with pelmets: Really good but you need to keep the curtains drawn and curtains/pelmets aren’t cheap.
Magnetite: A perspex window is added to the inside of the window using a magnetic frame. It is expensive but cheaper than putting in double glazing. We are happy with the result- no condensation and it looks like the original window.
Clear comfort: Probably the cheapest option. You stick this clear film over the window architrave coated with double sided tape and get the high dryer and pronto, ‘double glazing’. If you want a more flexible solution, make a wooden frame and put the clear comfort on it. You can remove this during summer and saves removing the double sided tape residue and you can replace it in winter.
Thermal blinds: This apparently have the same thermal properties as double glazing but cheaper. The effectiveness of this depends a lot on your window type. Our windows are not suitable for this being sash windows but there are ways around it.
We have rockwool in our walls and it is great. Everyone assumes we have double brick.

BTW, we have the required insulation in the roof but with the combination of time and a temporary possum tenant, it has flattened and needs to be replaced/covered with a new one.

We had new ceiling insulation put in some years ago as the original was very old and thin. Live in an ex-Govie. At the same time had wall cavity insulation pumped in via the roof tiles next to the wall. Where the windows are they drill a hole into the cement between the bricks and pump it through that, then they put cement into the whole. It made a great difference.

We also made our own double glaze with perspex which stops the cold coming through as it covers the whole metal frame. It also had stopped street noise.

Another way of doing it if you have wooden frames is using heat shrinkable wrap or get it from here http://www.clearcomfort.com.au

kean van choc11:05 am 04 Jul 16

After much quote gathering and internet research, we’re about to sign on the dotted line with Architech Windows (Queanbeyan) to retrofit uPVC double glazed windows and doors to our 60s era duplex.

So far Architech’s customer service has been excellent. They have been far more responsive than other Canberra providers.

Our expectation is that installation wil commence in September.

Will keep you posted.

I would also like to investigate retro fitting of wall insulation and double glazing of existing windows. Though I’m not new here, I’m feeling the cold more and more the older I get I’m afraid.

You do not mention whether you are looking for ceiling and/or wall insulation. Whether your existing windows are wood framed or metal ?

Had some friends retrofit “stick on” double glazing to existing metal framed windows. Not cheap but much cheaper than replacing windows. They said poor result – including moisture from condensation forming inside the panes leaving light stains. Not good. Hopefully someone on here has had a better experience with retrofitting double glazing and can recommend a good/effective solution.

I’m also looking to retrofitting of wall insulation (which would have to be “pump in”) but the supplier I have spoken to hasn’t exactly filled me with much confidence Im afraid – + it was hideously expensive. I’m also worried about how pump in wall insulation will get into all wall cavities and the impact of that on future electrical/cabling work – such as additional power points.

Not sure if there are any subsidy schemes available for these retro fitted energy saving initiatives either – probably not.

Any comments on these issues from people who have been there and done that, would be greatly appreciated.

InKambah said :

I’m interested in double glazing my windows in 2015. Any tips on a good vendor/contractor?

Look up ACTDoubleGlazed

InKambah said :

I’m interested in double glazing my windows in 2015. Any tips on a good vendor/contractor?

Are we allowed to mention a business name on here without being banished? last time I was on a forum and recommended someone I got sin binned, can’t understand why as the question was “who can recommend”

I’m interested in double glazing my windows in 2015. Any tips on a good vendor/contractor?

Masquara said :

davo101 said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

dungfungus said :

Does argon gas in between the two panes of glass make any difference?

Not in canberra.

So you’re claiming that the laws of physics operate differently in Canberra? Hope you have a source for that.

Canberra isn’t very cold, so the sorts of double glazing niceties that matter in Trondheim and Skarfskerry may not be worth extra cost where the coldest-case-scenario is around minus 8.5.

What about heating and cooling costs, in Canberra? Not too extreme, but could still be enough to make some savings. Some calculation along those lines. I expect there’s something to it.

As for Argon, it’s a noble gas. Doesn’t interact with other stuff (or even itself I think?). It’s like a bunch of silent vow monks. That’d make a good insulator. Seems about right.

(A vacuum would do better, but Argon pays better rent for the space).

Didn’t know it was used in windows. Interesting to bring that up, dungfungus.

davo101 said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

dungfungus said :

Does argon gas in between the two panes of glass make any difference?

Not in canberra.

So you’re claiming that the laws of physics operate differently in Canberra? Hope you have a source for that.

Canberra isn’t very cold, so the sorts of double glazing niceties that matter in Trondheim and Skarfskerry may not be worth extra cost where the coldest-case-scenario is around minus 8.5.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

dungfungus said :

Does argon gas in between the two panes of glass make any difference?

Not in canberra.

So you’re claiming that the laws of physics operate differently in Canberra? Hope you have a source for that.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Maya123 said :

Make sure the gap between the glass is wide enough. 12mm I have read is a good distance. Don’t get double glazing with the 6mm gaps; it isn’t enough. Also check how good the seals are; it varies.
If you get aluminium frames make sure they have thermal breaks, or the cold/heat will go straight through them. Get pale coloured ones too. Years ago I was told in a lecture on double glazing that the insulation of a double glazed aluminium framed window without thermal break, was no better than a single glazed wooden framed window. Wooden frames are even better insulation, but not everyone likes the clunky look, or the extra maintenance.
Unfortunately many cheaper aluminium framed windows have no thermal break, and when I was buying them a couple of years ago, also only about 6mm between the glass panes. I paid extra and bought windows with wider gaps and thermal breaks. Don’t necessarily believe the sales person; do your own research, as after all, they have to sell their product.

Not entirely true. 6mm gap with the correct combination of glass is far mre effective than two pieces of float glass with a 12mm gap.

It is not a matter (or shouldn’t be) of that or that. It’s the matter of a combination of the best glass AND the best gap. 6mm is too little.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd10:10 pm 25 Jul 14

dungfungus said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Maya123 said :

Make sure the gap between the glass is wide enough. 12mm I have read is a good distance. Don’t get double glazing with the 6mm gaps; it isn’t enough. Also check how good the seals are; it varies.
If you get aluminium frames make sure they have thermal breaks, or the cold/heat will go straight through them. Get pale coloured ones too. Years ago I was told in a lecture on double glazing that the insulation of a double glazed aluminium framed window without thermal break, was no better than a single glazed wooden framed window. Wooden frames are even better insulation, but not everyone likes the clunky look, or the extra maintenance.
Unfortunately many cheaper aluminium framed windows have no thermal break, and when I was buying them a couple of years ago, also only about 6mm between the glass panes. I paid extra and bought windows with wider gaps and thermal breaks. Don’t necessarily believe the sales person; do your own research, as after all, they have to sell their product.

Not entirely true. 6mm gap with the correct combination of glass is far mre effective than two pieces of float glass with a 12mm gap.

Does argon gas in between the two panes of glass make any difference?

Not in canberra.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Maya123 said :

Make sure the gap between the glass is wide enough. 12mm I have read is a good distance. Don’t get double glazing with the 6mm gaps; it isn’t enough. Also check how good the seals are; it varies.
If you get aluminium frames make sure they have thermal breaks, or the cold/heat will go straight through them. Get pale coloured ones too. Years ago I was told in a lecture on double glazing that the insulation of a double glazed aluminium framed window without thermal break, was no better than a single glazed wooden framed window. Wooden frames are even better insulation, but not everyone likes the clunky look, or the extra maintenance.
Unfortunately many cheaper aluminium framed windows have no thermal break, and when I was buying them a couple of years ago, also only about 6mm between the glass panes. I paid extra and bought windows with wider gaps and thermal breaks. Don’t necessarily believe the sales person; do your own research, as after all, they have to sell their product.

Not entirely true. 6mm gap with the correct combination of glass is far mre effective than two pieces of float glass with a 12mm gap.

Does argon gas in between the two panes of glass make any difference?

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd7:57 pm 25 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

Make sure the gap between the glass is wide enough. 12mm I have read is a good distance. Don’t get double glazing with the 6mm gaps; it isn’t enough. Also check how good the seals are; it varies.
If you get aluminium frames make sure they have thermal breaks, or the cold/heat will go straight through them. Get pale coloured ones too. Years ago I was told in a lecture on double glazing that the insulation of a double glazed aluminium framed window without thermal break, was no better than a single glazed wooden framed window. Wooden frames are even better insulation, but not everyone likes the clunky look, or the extra maintenance.
Unfortunately many cheaper aluminium framed windows have no thermal break, and when I was buying them a couple of years ago, also only about 6mm between the glass panes. I paid extra and bought windows with wider gaps and thermal breaks. Don’t necessarily believe the sales person; do your own research, as after all, they have to sell their product.

Not entirely true. 6mm gap with the correct combination of glass is far mre effective than two pieces of float glass with a 12mm gap.

Make sure the gap between the glass is wide enough. 12mm I have read is a good distance. Don’t get double glazing with the 6mm gaps; it isn’t enough. Also check how good the seals are; it varies.
If you get aluminium frames make sure they have thermal breaks, or the cold/heat will go straight through them. Get pale coloured ones too. Years ago I was told in a lecture on double glazing that the insulation of a double glazed aluminium framed window without thermal break, was no better than a single glazed wooden framed window. Wooden frames are even better insulation, but not everyone likes the clunky look, or the extra maintenance.
Unfortunately many cheaper aluminium framed windows have no thermal break, and when I was buying them a couple of years ago, also only about 6mm between the glass panes. I paid extra and bought windows with wider gaps and thermal breaks. Don’t necessarily believe the sales person; do your own research, as after all, they have to sell their product.

Surely efficient double glazing will inhibit the take-up of heat into interior thermal masses?

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd9:13 am 25 Jul 14

Magnetite ACT said :

Hi all,

I am Michael from Magnetite Windows in Mitchell. We specialise in converting exisiting windows into double glazed.

There are a few companies in Canberra that can provide double glazing but like all things in this world you do have to be careful that you are getting a product that is going to perform how you plan.

My recommendation, as suggested by a few already, is to do some comparison on the WERS (Window energy rating scheme) website. That way you can see from a third party what kind of performance you will get with each option. Go to http://www.wers.net/werscontent/certified-products-residential and look up the company of your choice. It gives % improvements for both summer and winter scenarios.

You will note on there that Aluminium framed windows (Single or double glazerd) reduces the overall performance of the window considerably so I would really consider going with either timber or PVC framed double glazing if you are doing a new home or choose to replace your windows.

The best alternative (Our company :-)) is Magnetite, a very cost effective way of achieving one of the best performance windows available in Australia, without the hassles of replacement.

Being in operation in Canberra for 12 years we have great experience and we have won Australian Business Awards for “Best Value”, “Product Excellence” and “Service Excellence” over the years.

Our independent results that indicate how well Magnetite works are found here http://werscpd.net.barberry.arvixe.com/table.aspx?Manufacturer=MAGNETITEACT

We have solutions for all types of Windows, Doors, Sliding Doors, Skylights etc

Here is a great video explaining how Magnetite works http://www.magnetite.com.au/how-magnetite-works.aspx

We offer free no obligation quotes so give us a call to organise an assessment of your windows
6255-7220.

Happy Double Glazing.

Regards,
Michael

What you say about aluminium frames is correct, but does not really apply in canberra. Double glazed aluminium windows are great here.

Everyone needs to be aware that while upvc windows perform well, that they are not designed to have security screens or doors in most cases.
Now there are ways to make it work, but it involves special packing material and makes the finished product nt look the best.

From what I have seen, magnetite is a good option for thermal and sound reasons, but ugly.

Go to “related content” and read the previous threads.
If your windows are still in good condition and they do not leak it would be better (and far cheaper) to look at one of the plastic sheetings that are available as you will get the same result.
Replacing windows is pretty brutal and you can expect sill tiles (that may not be available anymore) to be smashed. Are you aware that the reveals and architraves need to be replaced and painted as well?

I am looking to retrofit double glazing – has anyone got any recommendations. Please don’t repeat any advice about DIY jobs involving Perspex or plastic sheeting as I am not going down that route. I have asked for several quotes from companies, but would really appreciate word of mouth recommendations (or warnings about ripoff companies and shoddy work). Thank you!

Magnetite ACT8:48 am 12 Jun 14

Hi all,

I am Michael from Magnetite Windows in Mitchell. We specialise in converting exisiting windows into double glazed.

There are a few companies in Canberra that can provide double glazing but like all things in this world you do have to be careful that you are getting a product that is going to perform how you plan.

My recommendation, as suggested by a few already, is to do some comparison on the WERS (Window energy rating scheme) website. That way you can see from a third party what kind of performance you will get with each option. Go to http://www.wers.net/werscontent/certified-products-residential and look up the company of your choice. It gives % improvements for both summer and winter scenarios.

You will note on there that Aluminium framed windows (Single or double glazerd) reduces the overall performance of the window considerably so I would really consider going with either timber or PVC framed double glazing if you are doing a new home or choose to replace your windows.

The best alternative (Our company :-)) is Magnetite, a very cost effective way of achieving one of the best performance windows available in Australia, without the hassles of replacement.

Being in operation in Canberra for 12 years we have great experience and we have won Australian Business Awards for “Best Value”, “Product Excellence” and “Service Excellence” over the years.

Our independent results that indicate how well Magnetite works are found here http://werscpd.net.barberry.arvixe.com/table.aspx?Manufacturer=MAGNETITEACT

We have solutions for all types of Windows, Doors, Sliding Doors, Skylights etc

Here is a great video explaining how Magnetite works http://www.magnetite.com.au/how-magnetite-works.aspx

We offer free no obligation quotes so give us a call to organise an assessment of your windows
6255-7220.

Happy Double Glazing.

Regards,
Michael

Maya123 said :

JimCharles said :

Enezeusa said :

Thank you all for your comments.

Two questions:

Is it possible to get a free insulation assessment for my house?

Is there anyone in Canberra you would recommend to do the jobs? (assessment and double glazing)

I don’t know if it’s free for assessment, but there’s a firm in Woden who are now importing UPVC units from Ireland. Don’t know the cost, i guess with importing and this current need to charge Canberra prices for the staff wages might make it stack up a lot.
I can’t understand why nobody’s set up a manufacturer here, it’s not technically hard. I bought mine in England from a little company, they basically order the materials and put them together in a large garage, knocked out the old windows, slotted them into the existing holes.. .we didn’t even need to re-plaster or paint more than an inch. Took a day.

I had fun at Googong walking round the excellent expensive display homes asking why some of them had no double glazing whatsoever. Windy day, gas fires on, but you could feel the draft and the coldness round the windows. It’s not just about the heating bills, it just makes the place feel as if it’s got quality, feels more solid and comfortable.
You don’t need the whole house doing, but the difference in just getting some done is amazing.

The argument that Canberra doesn’t need it is ridiculous, they use it in America in similar climates and sun exposures, even just to feel you’ve built yourself a quality home.

The sad thing is that saying double glazing makes people “feel you’ve built yourself a quality home” might be more effective to get some people to include double glazing than saying that it cuts down heating bills, etc. It appears to me that the look and impression (big house, with entertainment room, theatre, several bathrooms, etc) is more important to many people than spending the same money on a more energy efficient house, because that, for the same money, might be smaller, and in their mind less showy.
“Windy day, gas fires on” In an energy efficient house, chances are on that same day it might not need to have that gas fire on.

It might be. It’s not just heating, it’s cooling.
I went to a refurbed home LEED assessment in Atlanta once, similar to Canberra with cold winters and hot summers, but much more humidity in their summer so breathing was hard and it’s much sweatier.
To prove the efficiency of insulation and workmanship, they leave all the internal doors open, tape a huge powerful vacuum over the front door, then switch it on. If any internal doors move, it fails because there’s a gap somewhere in the house because it’s drawing air from outside. Pass and you get a decent tax break. This house passed, they used to have their air con blowing all summer before the refurb, afterwards hardly needed it at all. Saved a fortune in electricity over summer, much more than needing more gas in winter.

These guys are based out of Sydney, but they do install in Canberra. They manufacture the windows in Sydney based on a German design.

http://www.kinzelindustries.com.au/

Enezeusa said :

Is there anyone in Canberra you would recommend to do the jobs? (assessment and double glazing)

http://werscpd.net.barberry.arvixe.com/browse.aspx?state=ACT

JimCharles said :

Enezeusa said :

Thank you all for your comments.

Two questions:

Is it possible to get a free insulation assessment for my house?

Is there anyone in Canberra you would recommend to do the jobs? (assessment and double glazing)

I don’t know if it’s free for assessment, but there’s a firm in Woden who are now importing UPVC units from Ireland. Don’t know the cost, i guess with importing and this current need to charge Canberra prices for the staff wages might make it stack up a lot.
I can’t understand why nobody’s set up a manufacturer here, it’s not technically hard. I bought mine in England from a little company, they basically order the materials and put them together in a large garage, knocked out the old windows, slotted them into the existing holes.. .we didn’t even need to re-plaster or paint more than an inch. Took a day.

I had fun at Googong walking round the excellent expensive display homes asking why some of them had no double glazing whatsoever. Windy day, gas fires on, but you could feel the draft and the coldness round the windows. It’s not just about the heating bills, it just makes the place feel as if it’s got quality, feels more solid and comfortable.
You don’t need the whole house doing, but the difference in just getting some done is amazing.

The argument that Canberra doesn’t need it is ridiculous, they use it in America in similar climates and sun exposures, even just to feel you’ve built yourself a quality home.

The sad thing is that saying double glazing makes people “feel you’ve built yourself a quality home” might be more effective to get some people to include double glazing than saying that it cuts down heating bills, etc. It appears to me that the look and impression (big house, with entertainment room, theatre, several bathrooms, etc) is more important to many people than spending the same money on a more energy efficient house, because that, for the same money, might be smaller, and in their mind less showy.
“Windy day, gas fires on” In an energy efficient house, chances are on that same day it might not need to have that gas fire on.

Enezeusa said :

Thank you all for your comments.

Two questions:

Is it possible to get a free insulation assessment for my house?

Is there anyone in Canberra you would recommend to do the jobs? (assessment and double glazing)

I don’t know if it’s free for assessment, but there’s a firm in Woden who are now importing UPVC units from Ireland. Don’t know the cost, i guess with importing and this current need to charge Canberra prices for the staff wages might make it stack up a lot.
I can’t understand why nobody’s set up a manufacturer here, it’s not technically hard. I bought mine in England from a little company, they basically order the materials and put them together in a large garage, knocked out the old windows, slotted them into the existing holes.. .we didn’t even need to re-plaster or paint more than an inch. Took a day.

I had fun at Googong walking round the excellent expensive display homes asking why some of them had no double glazing whatsoever. Windy day, gas fires on, but you could feel the draft and the coldness round the windows. It’s not just about the heating bills, it just makes the place feel as if it’s got quality, feels more solid and comfortable.
You don’t need the whole house doing, but the difference in just getting some done is amazing.

The argument that Canberra doesn’t need it is ridiculous, they use it in America in similar climates and sun exposures, even just to feel you’ve built yourself a quality home.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Maya123 said :

switch said :

OpenYourMind said :

I’ve said it in previous posts on this issue. If money is an issue, and your windows lend themselves to it, it’s relatively easy to DIY double glazing.

Yeah, just stick bubble-wrap to the window.

In my previous house I stuck plastic shrink wrap to the wooden frames. I had a good gap between the glass and plastic; at least 10mm. The plastic was not as good as ‘proper’ double glazing, but it only cost me $100 to do half the house. The other half of the house’s windows would have needed a winter frame built, because a previous owner had improved (not) the windows by replacing them with second-hand aluminium windows which had virtually no distance from the glass to the edge of the frame, thereby making it useless to try to double glaze with shrink wrap plastic without building a frame. Not being as simple as sticking on plastic shrink wrap, I never got around to doing this. Plus the heat went straight though the aluminium frames and shrink wrap might have been a waste of time anyway with the aluminium windows.
My present house has double glazed windows with thermal break frames, with a good gap between the glass, low-e glass and argon filled. I suspect the thermal breaks could be better though. I also chose windows with good rubber seals. Many (well known brands) only appeared to have ’tissue paper’ for seals. How did I afford this? Simply by building a smaller house than most modern houses. But most people seem to prefer a large McMansion (larger houses than in our parents/grandparents era) than to build a smaller house and then be able to afford things like double glazing; even though modern households are smaller than in the past.

No need for argon gas units in canberra. Waste of money.

Why do you think this is a waste of money? It doesn’t add a lot extra to the cost.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd5:24 pm 13 May 14

Maya123 said :

switch said :

OpenYourMind said :

I’ve said it in previous posts on this issue. If money is an issue, and your windows lend themselves to it, it’s relatively easy to DIY double glazing.

Yeah, just stick bubble-wrap to the window.

In my previous house I stuck plastic shrink wrap to the wooden frames. I had a good gap between the glass and plastic; at least 10mm. The plastic was not as good as ‘proper’ double glazing, but it only cost me $100 to do half the house. The other half of the house’s windows would have needed a winter frame built, because a previous owner had improved (not) the windows by replacing them with second-hand aluminium windows which had virtually no distance from the glass to the edge of the frame, thereby making it useless to try to double glaze with shrink wrap plastic without building a frame. Not being as simple as sticking on plastic shrink wrap, I never got around to doing this. Plus the heat went straight though the aluminium frames and shrink wrap might have been a waste of time anyway with the aluminium windows.
My present house has double glazed windows with thermal break frames, with a good gap between the glass, low-e glass and argon filled. I suspect the thermal breaks could be better though. I also chose windows with good rubber seals. Many (well known brands) only appeared to have ’tissue paper’ for seals. How did I afford this? Simply by building a smaller house than most modern houses. But most people seem to prefer a large McMansion (larger houses than in our parents/grandparents era) than to build a smaller house and then be able to afford things like double glazing; even though modern households are smaller than in the past.

No need for argon gas units in canberra. Waste of money.

Thank you all for your comments.

Two questions:

Is it possible to get a free insulation assessment for my house?

Is there anyone in Canberra you would recommend to do the jobs? (assessment and double glazing)

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd11:32 am 13 May 14

Pork Hunt said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Postalgeek said :

Maya123 said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

No point double glazing unless every window has at least one pane of 6.38. A double glazed unit consisting of only float is a complete waste of money.

I don’t understand what you are saying. What do you mean by float and 6.38?

I assume 6.38 is thickness, i.e 6.38 mm and float glass is bottom-rung stuff you’ll find in a window pane (that being an Australian window pane), as opposed to toughened/tempered/laminated glass which you’ll see used in cars and glass doors.

Sorry sorry.

6.38 = laminated glass. That is, two pieces of glass glued together with a interlayer. The interlayer makes a huge difference to thermal leakage.

Float glass = normal plate glass. Zero thermal advantage, even in a double glazed unit.

If you have a glazing background it may go some way to explaining why you can be such a pane 🙂

Source?

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd11:31 am 13 May 14

arescarti42 said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Float glass = normal plate glass. Zero thermal advantage, even in a double glazed unit.

Proof?

Even if you’re using normal plate glass, the insulation provided by the air layer should reduce conductive losses considerably and be very effective.

There is a online u value calculator that has the numbers.

And as another said, no point double glazing unless you have proper draft protection and insulation installed.

switch said :

OpenYourMind said :

I’ve said it in previous posts on this issue. If money is an issue, and your windows lend themselves to it, it’s relatively easy to DIY double glazing.

Yeah, just stick bubble-wrap to the window.

In my previous house I stuck plastic shrink wrap to the wooden frames. I had a good gap between the glass and plastic; at least 10mm. The plastic was not as good as ‘proper’ double glazing, but it only cost me $100 to do half the house. The other half of the house’s windows would have needed a winter frame built, because a previous owner had improved (not) the windows by replacing them with second-hand aluminium windows which had virtually no distance from the glass to the edge of the frame, thereby making it useless to try to double glaze with shrink wrap plastic without building a frame. Not being as simple as sticking on plastic shrink wrap, I never got around to doing this. Plus the heat went straight though the aluminium frames and shrink wrap might have been a waste of time anyway with the aluminium windows.
My present house has double glazed windows with thermal break frames, with a good gap between the glass, low-e glass and argon filled. I suspect the thermal breaks could be better though. I also chose windows with good rubber seals. Many (well known brands) only appeared to have ’tissue paper’ for seals. How did I afford this? Simply by building a smaller house than most modern houses. But most people seem to prefer a large McMansion (larger houses than in our parents/grandparents era) than to build a smaller house and then be able to afford things like double glazing; even though modern households are smaller than in the past.

justsomeaussie10:37 am 13 May 14

Maya123 said :

Go for a house built for quality, not quantity as in the suburbs full of huge McMansions.

Damn all those people building the houses they want. They should be forced to build grey 3 bedroom cubes.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Postalgeek said :

Maya123 said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

No point double glazing unless every window has at least one pane of 6.38. A double glazed unit consisting of only float is a complete waste of money.

I don’t understand what you are saying. What do you mean by float and 6.38?

I assume 6.38 is thickness, i.e 6.38 mm and float glass is bottom-rung stuff you’ll find in a window pane (that being an Australian window pane), as opposed to toughened/tempered/laminated glass which you’ll see used in cars and glass doors.

Sorry sorry.

6.38 = laminated glass. That is, two pieces of glass glued together with a interlayer. The interlayer makes a huge difference to thermal leakage.

Float glass = normal plate glass. Zero thermal advantage, even in a double glazed unit.

If you have a glazing background it may go some way to explaining why you can be such a pane 🙂

OpenYourMind said :

I’ve said it in previous posts on this issue. If money is an issue, and your windows lend themselves to it, it’s relatively easy to DIY double glazing.

Yeah, just stick bubble-wrap to the window.

OpenYourMind6:32 am 13 May 14

I’ve said it in previous posts on this issue. If money is an issue, and your windows lend themselves to it, it’s relatively easy to DIY double glazing. Measure your window accurately in mm. Then just buy some 12mm square timber dowel, cut it to fit tightly in your window frame against the glass. Then call ACT Plastics and get a sheet of acrylic/perspex cut to the size of your window frame (less 3mm for expansion). Then use some method of holding the perspex in eg. small clips.

Not only will you get cheap double glazing, it may perform better than double glass anyway as perspex is a worse conductor of heat.

There are some disadvantages. Perspex expands contracts more than glass, it could deteriorate over a long period of time.

But a huge advantage is your windows are very difficult to break from inside. Our toddler has smacked toy trucks into the perspex and not damaged the glass behind.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Float glass = normal plate glass. Zero thermal advantage, even in a double glazed unit.

Proof?

Even if you’re using normal plate glass, the insulation provided by the air layer should reduce conductive losses considerably and be very effective.

Maya123 said :

Perhaps more people could afford double glazing if they dropped the entertainment room, the extra bathrooms, etc. Go for a house built for quality, not quantity as in the suburbs full of huge McMansions.

More people could afford double glazing if more people brought it. At the moment in Australia it is a niche product and priced as such. Elsewhere it is the norm and costs significantly less than what is being charged here. Vicious circle I guess.

Proper double glazed windows are but part of the job. They need to be assisted by plugging all the leaks and good wall, underfloor and ceiling insulation. Not cheap in short term, but pays off in medium term.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd7:58 pm 12 May 14

Postalgeek said :

Maya123 said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

No point double glazing unless every window has at least one pane of 6.38. A double glazed unit consisting of only float is a complete waste of money.

I don’t understand what you are saying. What do you mean by float and 6.38?

I assume 6.38 is thickness, i.e 6.38 mm and float glass is bottom-rung stuff you’ll find in a window pane (that being an Australian window pane), as opposed to toughened/tempered/laminated glass which you’ll see used in cars and glass doors.

Sorry sorry.

6.38 = laminated glass. That is, two pieces of glass glued together with a interlayer. The interlayer makes a huge difference to thermal leakage.

Float glass = normal plate glass. Zero thermal advantage, even in a double glazed unit.

Maya123 said :

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

No point double glazing unless every window has at least one pane of 6.38. A double glazed unit consisting of only float is a complete waste of money.

I don’t understand what you are saying. What do you mean by float and 6.38?

I assume 6.38 is thickness, i.e 6.38 mm and float glass is bottom-rung stuff you’ll find in a window pane (that being an Australian window pane), as opposed to toughened/tempered/laminated glass which you’ll see used in cars and glass doors.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

No point double glazing unless every window has at least one pane of 6.38. A double glazed unit consisting of only float is a complete waste of money.

I don’t understand what you are saying. What do you mean by float and 6.38?

Cost me less than £2000 to have my whole house doubled glazed in the UK around five years ago (including the fitting)…

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd6:39 pm 12 May 14

No point double glazing unless every window has at least one pane of 6.38. A double glazed unit consisting of only float is a complete waste of money.

Perhaps more people could afford double glazing if they dropped the entertainment room, the extra bathrooms, etc. Go for a house built for quality, not quantity as in the suburbs full of huge McMansions.

Double glazing costs a lot. Adding another 5-10% to the build cost of a new home pushes up the price that much more.

Personally I think the money is better spent on more insulation, more efficient heating/cooling and better quality construction.

arescarti42 said :

dungfungus said :

.
I can’t understand why it isn’t mandatory for new homes to have double glazing.

dungfungus said :

.
All up cost is about $1,500 a large window / sliding door and $900 for a medium one.

You answered your own question. I’m not sure how much some cr$#%y aluminium single pane window costs, but I imagine the answer is a lot less.

The point I was making (maybe a bit deep for some readers) was that while a new house has to be “solar orientated” by regulation, they throw the baby out with the bathwater by not including double glazing as a standard.

dungfungus said :

.
I can’t understand why it isn’t mandatory for new homes to have double glazing.

dungfungus said :

.
All up cost is about $1,500 a large window / sliding door and $900 for a medium one.

You answered your own question. I’m not sure how much some cr$#%y aluminium single pane window costs, but I imagine the answer is a lot less.

For quality at a competitive price the European Decueuninck UPVC frames from Windows for Life in Melbourne are tops. They have thermal breaks in the reinforced frames and an additive in manufacture to make them endure the extremes of temperature in Australia.
They are built like strongroom doors and are extremely secure in locking. The frames are delivered with Australia Mountain Ash reveals already fitted and are glazed in situ after fitting.
The double glazing can be obtained from Australian Glass Group in Sydney.
Unfortunately, the local agent in Canberra is not as good as the products so if you can deal direct with the suppliers do it that way. You need an expert installer (and the same person to take out old windows) and the people for that are TSW Constructions, 0422452922.
All up cost is about $1,500 a large window / sliding door and $900 for a medium one.
I can’t understand why it isn’t mandatory for new homes to have double glazing.

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